RIDING TIPS FOR NEW AND EXPERIENCED RIDERS - Page 2 - Honda Shadow Forums : Shadow Motorcycle Forum
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post #11 of 154 (permalink) Old 04-09-2009, 09:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SactoEJ
Quote:
Originally Posted by orange750
I will definitely be taking the MSC but I imagine they would expect you to already have that technique (counter steering) down pat.
Nope - they don't expect you to know it. It helps if you have some experience, but it really starts at the basics and builds up. Make sure to talk to the instructor and ask for extra help if you need it - there's plenty of extra time during breaks and lunch to ensure you get everything you need from the class.
Thanks, that gives me a little relief. I'm scheduled to take the class May 8 - 10. They provide a Honda 250 for the course so that should help, too. I am definitely getting psyched up.
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post #12 of 154 (permalink) Old 04-28-2009, 10:36 PM
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I suggest that you find a nice, isolated parking lot on a weekend (such as a school) to pratice countersteering. If not, your instructors will help you. I loved the class having just completed it; I had fun and learned a lot. You will, too!



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post #13 of 154 (permalink) Old 05-06-2009, 08:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by orange750
I agree this is all very good advice and I plan to read it all several times over before I get back in the saddle after 30+ years. I am still trying to get my head around this "countersteer" stuff. "Push on the left handgrip to go left". I'm really trying to understand this and I'm sure I must before I get out on the road - in traffic, no less. I will definitely be taking the MSC but I imagine they would expect you to already have that technique down pat.
Its much simpler than it sounds- so when in doubt, go to youtube!

I scanned several of the videos and while I wouldn't do alot of the stuff this guy does about 1:45 into the video is a great demonstration of what the whole press left- go left; press right- go right idea is-

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EAHxa7M5cV8
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post #14 of 154 (permalink) Old 06-09-2009, 05:35 PM
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doubtful

"Be as LOUD and OBNOXIOUS as you can be!"

I'm sorry, but I have to disagree with this. Being loud and obnoxious changes the average driver's attitude toward bikers from apathy to hatred. People who are driving several tons of metal nearby are not people you want hating you.

Whether or not "loud pipes save lives" is debatable, anyway. When a driver has the AC on and is thumping whatever passes for music these days out of a bass cannon, they wouldn't hear a brass band if it were in the back seat. And the little old ladies are on another planet, and wouldn't notice a dinosaur in the middle of the road much less a bike.

And, after a couple hundred miles non-stop miles, loud pipes start to annoy you as much as the other drivers.

My pipes are fairly loud, but myself, I want to be able to hear what the engine is doing, and I get a second or two more reaction time if I hear it before it gets to the pipes. I've been riding for 25 years and what saves lives is this: drive for everybody on the road, and treat everybody in a car like a dangerous idiot. Assume they are going to pull out in front of you or change lanes suddenly. Assume they can't see you. Assume they are homicidal. Stay as far away from them as you can, and stay hyper-alert at all times.
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post #15 of 154 (permalink) Old 07-12-2009, 02:41 PM
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Wonderful information in all the above posts. Can't read them enough.
Situations that will happen to all motorcylists:
A vehicle coming in the opposite direction will turn left in front of you.
Debris on the road will require some real quick reaction time to avoid.
At night the stuff that is blown out of pickup truck beds will test your ability to survive. Just be very cautious 100% of the time you are on your bike.

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post #16 of 154 (permalink) Old 09-12-2009, 11:28 PM
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awesome stuff.

I just got signed up for a MSC here in a couple weeks.
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post #17 of 154 (permalink) Old 11-11-2009, 04:06 AM
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Taking a MSC myself in the next few weeks, this post definitely offers a lot of knowledge, both MSC learned and experience learned.

I have ridden dirt bikes and motorcycles(my dad and neighbor are both insane over anything with more or less than 4 wheels) and have learned a lot.

When my sister got her license I gave her what I believe to be the most important piece of information I know of driving ANYTHING, and that is do not trust anybody when driving. This applies to cars, trucks, motorcycles, anything. Always assume that the worst decision will be made and prepare for it.

One instance comes to mind when thinking of this, I was driving down a back road(I live in the country, all roads are back roads) and saw a car at a stop sign. There were four people in the car, the driver was currently checking the other direction. I noted the car was pointed in my direction so they were probably turning towards me, crossing my lane.

Not knowing whether the driver had looked in my direction before I topped the hill, I assumed the driver would not look and would pull out, so I slowed down and moved to the outside of the lane.

Most people, when pulling out and realizing they are cutting someone off or pulling out in front of someone naturally slam on the brakes, so I wanted to be able to swerve around them, but slowed enough that I could stop/go the other way. Sure enough, the driver pulled out, saw me, stopped in the middle of my lane and I was able to go around the car.

SO...do not trust anyone, they will never do the right thing. This is my mind set when driving. Even when riding in a car I do not listen to someone saying"clear my way" as this is assuredly the easiest way to get hit.

Again, thanks for the post, a lot of good information.
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post #18 of 154 (permalink) Old 12-19-2009, 10:22 AM
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Bridges:
In cool weather, even if temps. are above freezing, any moisture on the road
will be cooler than the normal road due to the cold air under the bridge. This
will be more slick than what any moisture normally is. I had an experience with BLACK ICE when the outside air temp. was above 40 degrees. I was in a my car, bike had dead battery, I slid right into the oncomming lane. If I would have been on my bike that early morning, who knows.



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post #19 of 154 (permalink) Old 12-23-2009, 12:13 PM
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This is GREAT stuff!!! Having just gotten into riding about 4 years ago (I'm 53 yo) after taking the basic rider's course, I must have "bypassed" that stage of my life that wants loud and fast! I drive my car and ride my bike like a p***y!! LOL And I'm ok with that because I definitely don't want to be in an accident.

For you experienced riders out there, I want you to know that I am listening to what you have to say. So please explain what happened to me the other day (other than the obvious) and what I should do the next time it happens.

I was at a stop light waiting to turn (a fairly tight) right onto a street. When the light turned green, I accelerated smoothly into first and while turning right going about 10 mph, my right foot rest contacted the street (causing me quite the [email protected]!!). My first reaction was to pull my foot up and lessen the bank of my turn which caused me to head towards the centerline where another car was approaching. Because I was going so slow, I was able to complete my turn just shy of the centerline.

Thinking back, I probably should have completed the turn as planned and simply allowed the footrest (and my foot) to hinge up as required while contacting the road until the turn was complete enough that the footrest stopped touching the road.

The funny thing is, I don't think I was banking that much and I'm not a speed demon!!

Any ideas folks? Thanks so much!!! : ) Happy Riding!

Greg

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post #20 of 154 (permalink) Old 03-02-2010, 10:50 AM
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Greg,

I am sure that you were going slow or the foot peg would not have dragged the pavement. It is always a surprise to drag a foot peg like that. I am just figuring that when it starting dragging you probably looked down a bit because of the surprise, and believe me, it IS a surprise. Ask me how I know.
Do your best to keep your eyes on your path of travel and regardless whether it drags or not you will be the better for it. From the way you describe it, you were probably doing a bit of counter-balancing. It all comes with practice. I am sure that you heard in your MSF class that you will go where you look. In tight turns if you look down you will surely put your foot down of even worse, go down with the bike.
For instance, if you are doing cone weaves and look down at one of the cones while you are going around one, you will surely hit it. I have found this to be true regardless of your experience. I have occasionally been demonstrating an exercise of cone weave and looked down at one if I was fairly close and it is almost impossible to miss it. You will go where you look.
This is especially useful to know when you are on curvy roads and find yourself looking at the guard rail. Bad thing to do. Keep your eyes on your intended path of travel. You will go where you look.

Ride Safely,

Ed


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