Radiator Weep from Mounting Studs - Page 2 - Honda Shadow Forums : Shadow Motorcycle Forum
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post #11 of 23 (permalink) Old 03-08-2019, 12:09 PM
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We are forgetting Flex Seal. It fixes everything !

Just joking, I doubt it will work either.

It is very hard to seal any leak from the outside. Coolant, oil , etc.
Especially under pressure.

Probably a new radiator is the best solution.


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post #12 of 23 (permalink) Old 03-08-2019, 01:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by swifty2014 View Post
We are forgetting Flex Seal. It fixes everything !

Just joking, I doubt it will work either.

It is very hard to seal any leak from the outside. Coolant, oil , etc.
Especially under pressure.

Probably a new radiator is the best solution.

My thoughts exactly. Even a pinhole leak, barely noticeable is enough to cause a loss of vacuum in the system, preventing the radiator from sucking in the coolant from the overflow bottle when the engine cools down.

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post #13 of 23 (permalink) Old 03-11-2019, 02:49 AM Thread Starter
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I'll definitely keep in mind a new/used rad. This guy had exactly the same leak and fixed it. I'll be working on mine this week and will keep you informed.

This goes against your advice but I'm stubborn and curious. And it's raining this week, perfect wrenching weather. Back on the lift she goes!

https://youtu.be/lDX52F1jl6I
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post #14 of 23 (permalink) Old 03-12-2019, 02:22 AM Thread Starter
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Update 1/2 - "The Patch"

Recap:
Since I just finished winter wrenching, everything is nice and clean and any presence of 'wet' is therefore easily traced. I noticed a drip hanging off the bottom of the radiator cover. (For the ACE Deluxe model, that is the black 'flap' partially covering the overflow bottle). Removed the cover, dried everything off, went for a ride around the block and checked again. This time there was a drip hanging off one of the studs. Everything above it was dry, everything around it was dry so it had to be the stud.


Findings:
This seems to be a known area for leaks to happen, at least for Shadows. To top it off, whoever installed it did a moron job as the rubber dampener that sits on the stud, was installed incorrectly, rendering the radiator to sit on the frame's bracket metal on metal. (Terrifying to think about the impact this radiator must have endured through my few months of riding it plus some previous owner use).


Action:
Aluminum is a **** to weld/solder/braze. It can be done but even the rad shop I called wasn't interested in doing it! I've seen people's videos with successful repairs, but from eyeballing their equipment, materials and technique it is quite apparent; this takes advanced skill I don't have. Trust me, I'm all in for learning ... and often the hard way unfortunately but this one I can predict. Either I mess up the stud beyond functional design, melt the radiator around the stud entirely or set my garage on fire. So!


Some have had success with JB Weld, others reported failure; however, it is the closest and cheapest option I can at the very least give a try. Overall chance? 50/50 for $10. I'll explain what I did exactly. If it works (update 2/2 coming in a few days) then you can follow these directions. If it doesn't work, then we at least know this method doesn't work. Deliberately saying 'method' as we also know that JB Weld has worked for others.

- Took a small rotary wire brush to the area around and the stud itself to remove paint and generally clean up the area.


- Took 400 grid sandpaper to the same area to roughen the surface. You should perhaps use something courser like 300 grid. This will roughen and increase the surface area.


- Cleaned the area with contact cleaner as it dries clean and very fast. This will remove any dirt, oils and other potential contaminants that will interfere with the adhesion. You can use rubbing alcohol for a similar effect. I personally will not use carb or brake cleaner as they leave a residue and take longer to evaporate completely. At this point we have a clean surface. Note that bare aluminum starts oxidizing immediately, more on that later.

- At this point I mixed the JB Weld. (This is the regular one that fully cures between 15 to 24 hours). Because it has a long working time, I set it aside for now while:


- I went back to the radiator. Since I'm not sure how fast the oxidation takes place, I re-worked it with (a new piece of) sandpaper, sprayed it with contact cleaner and used compressed air to blow away the cleaner and have it dry even quicker. Promptly after I applied the JB Weld.

- Made sure to adapt the JB Weld to the metal 'tightly' and to cover and seal all areas. The rubber dampener should still fit on the stud. Whatever your case, make sure nothing interferes with the glob after it has cured! I also feathered the patch into the metal as good as I could. It is a tricky material to manipulate and to make look good ... weak excuse.

Waiting for comments to come in now. "You should have done this! You did that wrong!" Ta ta!
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Last edited by AmsterDan; 03-12-2019 at 02:28 AM.
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post #15 of 23 (permalink) Old 03-12-2019, 06:10 AM
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I like the way you work, Dan! Prep is the key, and you certainly devoted the time to a damn good job of prepping.
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post #16 of 23 (permalink) Old 03-12-2019, 06:24 PM
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Looks like a nice job. But as I said before it is very hard to seal a leak from the outside.

But that looks solid to me.

I was thinking of this also. There are a lot of snake oil radiator sealers and I don't like the idea of running gunk down the tubes. They are pretty small. But if you could run some sealer into the bottom rad hose and let it run around the bottom tank and sits for a while and pour out the rest it may help from the inside and not clog anything. There was a product made by Wynns that was made from vegetable fibers and it wouldn't cause a clogging. I am sure there are some like that . Just a backup plan.

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post #17 of 23 (permalink) Old 03-13-2019, 02:06 AM Thread Starter
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@Chuck_Michigan Thanks! Prep can indeed be seen as the 'tedious and annoying' job, something to get over with asap. In the past I used to take on a similar approach which ends up being more work. As in a job poorly done and possibly needing to be redone anyway.

What helped me improve is to forget the final step of assembling or applying whatever it is I worked on. Instead, I've started taking pride, joy and the time to prep as it usually leads to a much higher rate of success in the end! Not telling you anything new haha. It's simply a transformation I've undergone.

@swifty2014 I'll keep that in mind. I didn't know of such a product. It sounds a bit tricky but your idea of localizing that product in the fashion described makes sense.

Which leaves me with update 2/2!

It's wet out but I took her for a spin around the block and I'm happy to report that the stud remained dry! Took a Q-tip to it, looking for blue radiator fluid. None so far.

In all fairness, the engine has not been revved nor was it at operating temperature fully. I topped off the radiator fluid at the cap and will follow up once I have a more conclusive short term update.
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post #18 of 23 (permalink) Old 03-13-2019, 06:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AmsterDan View Post
@Chuck_Michigan Thanks! Prep can indeed be seen as the 'tedious and annoying' job, something to get over with asap. In the past I used to take on a similar approach which ends up being more work. As in a job poorly done and possibly needing to be redone anyway.

What helped me improve is to forget the final step of assembling or applying whatever it is I worked on. Instead, I've started taking pride, joy and the time to prep as it usually leads to a much higher rate of success in the end! Not telling you anything new haha. It's simply a transformation I've undergone.

A man after my own heart. There's a saying in the Tool and Die trade (I'm one) that goes "There's never enough time to do a job right the first time, but there's always enough time to do it over." In 1985, my good friend at work gave me this poster, and it's been hanging in my garage for the last 34 years.
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post #19 of 23 (permalink) Old 03-13-2019, 09:41 PM Thread Starter
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Haha. It's proven to be true time and time again!

One hour commute total time today and we're keeping it dry!
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post #20 of 23 (permalink) Old 03-14-2019, 10:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jpr1968 View Post
You can't solder aluminum, it has to be welded.

Actually they make a aluminum solder for over 40 yrs. I seen it used in refrigerator repair. It also being demonstrated on Facebook earlier this week.





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