Another slave cylinder question, i know i know! - Honda Shadow Forums : Shadow Motorcycle Forum
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post #1 of 15 (permalink) Old 06-08-2019, 11:31 PM Thread Starter
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Model: VT 700
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Another slave cylinder question, i know i know!

Ok before I dived into this project I watched just about every you tube video, and forum I could find on bleeding slave cylinder. So backstory, bike sat for 10 years got it running etc etc. Ok the master cylinder was beyond shot, so replaced it will all new cylinder and lever. Pulled the slave cylinder out, and yeah it was disgusting. Pretty much crystallized, and everything was covered with gunk. Soaked all the pieces in chem dip, and installed all new seals. Put it all back together, and filled master cylinder with fluid. I used a pneumatic bleeder, and got it to the point where the lever was pretty stiff. It felt the same as any other hydraulic clutch I've used. Except when i pulled the clutch in rear tire doesn't move. So went back to the drawing board, started with bleeding the master cylinder. Went through a few bleeds and tried the clutch again. Nada. But I did notice if i pushed on the tire enough it would start to spin with some resistance, and it eventually starts to loosed up more, but no where near how it would be in neutral. If I let go of the clutch, and try again its the same thing over again. So I moved onto the slave cylinder and tried bleeding from there for a while. Same result and now my arms tired. So I called it a night, and figured Id ask here for some advice. Also when I bleed the fluid, its nice and clear.


Last edited by jmsanch; 06-08-2019 at 11:36 PM.
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post #2 of 15 (permalink) Old 06-08-2019, 11:59 PM
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Start bleeding low and work it high. Bleed it right at the slave cylinder and work your way up to the until you get to the last banjo bolt up by the lever. This worked for me on the vtr1000.

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post #3 of 15 (permalink) Old 06-09-2019, 12:15 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by kesanders View Post
Start bleeding low and work it high. Bleed it right at the slave cylinder and work your way up to the until you get to the last banjo bolt up by the lever. This worked for me on the vtr1000.
So what youre saying is, start at the bottom banjo bolt, then move to bleeder, then finally the master cylinder banjo bolt? I also heard plates could be stuck so there's that
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post #4 of 15 (permalink) Old 06-09-2019, 12:21 AM
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That's exactly what I would do. On some bikes, Hondas mainly they seem not to push too easy with the clutch pulled in. In neutral they are much easier. (That's my experience). Get it to where the clutch has a good feel and start it up and see how it reacts in gear. I hope this helps.
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post #5 of 15 (permalink) Old 06-09-2019, 02:30 AM
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My VT700 slave drove me nuts trying to get it to successfully bleed. I also wore my arm out pumping the clutch lever. Finally got it by disconnecting the banjo at the handle and using compressed air to force fluid through the line and out the slave bleeder. Then reattached the banjo, filled the upper reservoir and used a vacuum bleeder to finish bleeding.

If it jams, force it. If it breaks it needed replacing anyway.
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post #6 of 15 (permalink) Old 06-09-2019, 02:39 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by ShadowGeezer View Post
My VT700 slave drove me nuts trying to get it to successfully bleed. I also wore my arm out pumping the clutch lever. Finally got it by disconnecting the banjo at the handle and using compressed air to force fluid through the line and out the slave bleeder. Then reattached the banjo, filled the upper reservoir and used a vacuum bleeder to finish bleeding.
How did you force the air through the hose with air compressor? Connect a tube to air gun?
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post #7 of 15 (permalink) Old 06-09-2019, 02:50 PM
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Yup. If the bleeder is open, doesn't take much pressure. My brake fluid was "pretty muddy" when I fLushed it, and evidently I had some type of air lock going on where the clutch pull just wasn't pushing enough fluid to overcome it. In theory, if the bleeder is open and there isn't an air lock going on, the fluid should ooze on its own with gravity. Once I got it going I borrowed a vacuum bleeder and bled it again just to be sure.

If it jams, force it. If it breaks it needed replacing anyway.
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post #8 of 15 (permalink) Old 06-09-2019, 03:20 PM
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PS. I used an el cheapo Harbor Freight vacuum bleeder to finish the job.

If it jams, force it. If it breaks it needed replacing anyway.
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post #9 of 15 (permalink) Old 06-09-2019, 07:09 PM
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Experienced a similar situation. Ultimately the lesson we learned was to bleed it just as stated above. If there is any spot in the line that could possibly hold air, and air has gotten to it, you can bet it's there until you're able to force it out or change the angle and allow it to move freely. Good luck!

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post #10 of 15 (permalink) Old 06-11-2019, 09:20 AM Thread Starter
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Another thing thats kinda bugging me is this. I noticed the fluid level is sloooowly going down. I made a mark today on the site glass, just to make sure I'm not losing it. I can't find where a leak would be coming from. The clutch still feels nice and firm. This is a brand new clutch lever and master cylinder. I replaced all of the seals and coated them with brake fluid before I installed it. I also used new crush washers for all fitings. When I grab the clutch lever, i can see the hose bounce, and i don't see fluid leaking anywhere. Could it be just air bubbles coming up and thats why fluid is slowly dropping? I have yet to ride this bike since im waiting on new c clips for the fork seals. All i can do now is obsess over things as the bike sits on the stand

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