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1997 VT1100C Shadow Spirit
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’ve seen and heard plenty of folks online, and in person, mentioning that the 1100 Shadow’s rectifier and stator is prone to failure.
My question is whether I should just throw an aftermarket set in the bike over the winter, just to be safe? Are they THAT doomed to fail?
Next summer, I plant on putting on some mileage, as well as making at least one long voyage. The bike is a 97 and currently has about 7000 miles on it.
If it’s basically “only a matter of time,” then I just assume throw a fresh stator/rectifier set on it. What’s your experience with this?
 

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This what I`ve been told by independent bike mechanics. Could be just an old wives tale, but who knows.
Tire Wheel Plant Sky Fuel tank

Don`t use your bike to charge a weak battery.
Keep your battery fully charged when not riding.
Your bikes charging system is for keeping a charged battery charged, not charging a dead one.
 

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2001 Valkyrie I/S
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One thing you can do is to check the three yellow wire connector from the stator, they are known to fail and heat up from lack of good contact.
 
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Not a wives tail. Weak batter is going to balance the system. So it's more high rpm just to compete with the jobbers.
Always walk up to a 12.8 -12.4v battery for ideal jobber'ing. In fact, if the taillight was stuck on, it would kill a battery no matter how much PUSH it had.

I rely on the absolute. This cuts the wives tail right off her rear end. One would be ohm's law, the other would be the definition of E:
Magnetism - you cannot separate heat from the chemical reaction.

Get those two figured out then look at the white acid on the ground cable of the battery side.
Take the stator connectors apart and look for white chemRe there as well.
Antidote is the grease to counter the white crustizfuker going backwash on battery and connector.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but chemRe buildup at the prong connectors forms a resistance. Like shutting the door and the heat implodes back into itself for ground. So I think; it's the thinnest dip of epoxy around one wire with all those wraps, because AC has no ground in the stator, equally distributing the heat, but that one wire melting the epoxy 'touches the next wire' wrapped around it = Junk.
 

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'97 Spirit 1100 - Chandler, AZ
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Even at idle there's 16 Amps of current flowing through the yellow stator wires and nearly 20 Amps when revving it up.
With that kind of current, the slightest amount of electrical resistance causes a LOT of heat. Power (Watts) = Current (Amps squared) x Resistance (Ohms).
Just 0.1-Ohm's of resistance at 16 Amps generates 26 Watts of heat... ouch!

Any dirty, corroded, poorly crimped connector or pin can easily have that much resistance, so not too surprising to find melted wires and connectors in our aging wiring harnesses. In addition to the 3-pin connector on the yellow stator wires, also check the red connector that plugs onto the top of the starter relay. It routes power to the ignition switch and the rest of the bike. I found the red plug on my '97 Spirit partially melted and the pins corroded/dirty. Even after disassembly and cleaning, the connector still ran very hot.

Replaced it with a new one from e-Bay for $3.95. I used a good crimp tool then carefully soldered the wire (with minimal solder) to the connector at the crimp to further minimize resistance. The new connector and pins remain cool with the bike running... problem solved!

Kevin

Pink Gas Electrical wiring Magenta Electronic device
Motor vehicle Gas Magenta Electrical wiring Cable
Magenta Font Rectangle Gas Metal
 

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1995 VT1100C2
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Can someone explain the terms:
"jobbers"
"jobber'ing"
"chemRe"
"crustizfuker"

Unfortunately, I cannot find these terms in my Honda Common Service manual or model specific service manuals (although mine are somewhat older)

In any case it would be interesting to discuss the potential cause of R/R "3-wire failure" and wonder if it may be due to modified electrical components and/or batteries past their service life.
 

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Jobbers = light bulb, an ECU, a spark unit. Something between the wires performing a specific job.
Job beer ring = Here, hold my beer, let me change a good know coil.
chemRe = chemical Reaction causing resistance to flow to the next jobber.
crustizfuker = the no start at the battery, being the crustizz not wanting to flow current is the white chemRe.

3-wire failure = heat cannot be separated from the jobber. The chemRe is the killer of passing E to the next jobber. The crust of the matter is the magnetic environment we live in. Thus the failure of most jobbers is heat.
 

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2003 ACE 750CD, 1998 ACE Tourer
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Even at idle there's 16 Amps of current flowing through the yellow stator wires and nearly 20 Amps when revving it up.
With that kind of current, the slightest amount of electrical resistance causes a LOT of heat. Power (Watts) = Current (Amps squared) x Resistance (Ohms).
Just 0.1-Ohm's of resistance at 16 Amps generates 26 Watts of heat... ouch!

Any dirty, corroded, poorly crimped connector or pin can easily have that much resistance, so not too surprising to find melted wires and connectors in our aging wiring harnesses. In addition to the 3-pin connector on the yellow stator wires, also check the red connector that plugs onto the top of the starter relay. It routes power to the ignition switch and the rest of the bike. I found the red plug on my '97 Spirit partially melted and the pins corroded/dirty. Even after disassembly and cleaning, the connector still ran very hot.

Replaced it with a new one from e-Bay for $3.95. I used a good crimp tool then carefully soldered the wire (with minimal solder) to the connector at the crimp to further minimize resistance. The new connector and pins remain cool with the bike running... problem solved!

Kevin

View attachment 304266 View attachment 304267 View attachment 304268
Thanks for this valuable info. Its hard to enough to put things together in your mind when trying to find and fix a specific problem. Putting it all together to have a global understanding of our bike's systems over time to make sense takes responses like this. Thats really the only way to have a bike you can count on in the long run. You have to put in the hard work to learn and wrench with guidance from people who've been there.
 

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2002, Shadow Spirit 1100
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3,013 Posts
Jobbers = light bulb, an ECU, a spark unit. Something between the wires performing a specific job.
Job beer ring = Here, hold my beer, let me change a good know coil.
chemRe = chemical Reaction causing resistance to flow to the next jobber.
crustizfuker = the no start at the battery, being the crustizz not wanting to flow current is the white chemRe.

3-wire failure = heat cannot be separated from the jobber. The chemRe is the killer of passing E to the next jobber. The crust of the matter is the magnetic environment we live in. Thus the failure of most jobbers is heat.
I think you speak a foreign language of some sort, technical foreign, but that is good info. What bike do you have?
 

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1983 Honda vt750 Shadow
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Job·ber
/ˈjäbər/

Sky Electric blue Font Circle Logo

noun
  • 1. a wholesaler. North American
  • 2. a person who does casual or occasional work.
  • (in the UK) a principal or wholesaler who dealt only on the Stock Exchange with brokers, not directly with the public.
  • Bentone has his own language.
 

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I think you speak a foreign language of some sort, technical foreign, but that is good info. What bike do you have?
Swift is correct. WATT sounds good to me explaining the simple. My definition of magnetism was found in an old 1940's high school science book. You look up the definition of magnetism, hit F3 so the word search bar window pops up, type 'chemical reaction' in the search bar and nothing pops up.

That definition of mag out of that book was about all the short blip of abstract said it all. Threw in a new battery and forgot to grease the cable connections. Rode to a NAPA store, walked out, could not start the bike. Had lights, no crank. Pulled the battery, had the acid chemRe on the negative post lead, charged the battery, greased it, lasted a few more years.

I ride a first year ST1100 that sat since 1993. Another daily driver is in between tire changes, steering bearing service interval due is a ZX-14. On the ST, first thing was to look for the beginnings of the white powder at the stator, and at the main fuse connector [Kevin's photo], dipped those in vinegar, rinsed, greased, will check at first engine oil dump. Just passed my first 1000 miles on the trip, it reset itself, two more to go.

So WATT I say has to be used for it's on topic discussion. Lettuce count the ways. A component that does a job between wires sounds like a job's job, WATThell, lettuce use WOT ever the F'uk I want, no one listens any who.

Signed,
Bentone word not found in the dictionary and they're lost is the same word the job it was used for.
 

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2002, Shadow Spirit 1100
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Swift is correct. WATT sounds good to me explaining the simple. My definition of magnetism was found in an old 1940's high school science book. You look up the definition of magnetism, hit F3 so the word search bar window pops up, type 'chemical reaction' in the search bar and nothing pops up.

That definition of mag out of that book was about all the short blip of abstract said it all. Threw in a new battery and forgot to grease the cable connections. Rode to a NAPA store, walked out, could not start the bike. Had lights, no crank. Pulled the battery, had the acid chemRe on the negative post lead, charged the battery, greased it, lasted a few more years.

I ride a first year ST1100 that sat since 1993. Another daily driver is in between tire changes, steering bearing service interval due is a ZX-14. On the ST, first thing was to look for the beginnings of the white powder at the stator, and at the main fuse connector [Kevin's photo], dipped those in vinegar, rinsed, greased, will check at first engine oil dump. Just passed my first 1000 miles on the trip, it reset itself, two more to go.

So WATT I say has to be used for it's on topic discussion. Lettuce count the ways. A component that does a job between wires sounds like a job's job, WATThell, lettuce use WOT ever the F'uk I want, no one listens any who.

Signed,
Bentone word not found in the dictionary and they're lost is the same word the job it was used for.
You have some nice bikes. I have always used vaseline on the battery terminals and they never corrode.
 

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You have some nice bikes. I have always used vaseline on the battery terminals and they never corrode.
Thank you. The reason why I say thanks is a field challenger like yourself. Notice I just say grease, make no mention of WATT kind I use. Some site started to take me thru the coals I mention vaseline. Gee, what is vas made from I ask. Melting point factor? Well the fact that I used it, shat the fact up already.

Yeah, where were you when that was going on. Oh look, out in the field and never corroded using pee troll E YUM base, face it, someone starts in with another troll E yum, I've got your back.
 

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'83 VT750C; ‘21 SV650A
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So, the stators and rectifiers on the 1100 Shadows are NOT problematic? Instead, their reputation for failure is actually caused by bad connections?
There’s that, but most Rectifiers from the ‘90s and early ‘00s bikes (in general) are known for failure. It’s like they were trying to cheapen their manufacture or something. Also, people want MOSFETs the way they want LED lights.
 

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'97 Spirit 1100 - Chandler, AZ
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MOSFET's switch on/off much faster than traditional bipolar transistors used in our OEM R/R's.
Heat is generated during switching time from "on" to "off" and vice versa. During that transition (switching time) the transistor is effectively a resistor, generating a LOT of heat.
Compared to transistors, MOSFET's switch nearly instantaneously so a LOT less heat is generated. As a bonus, efficiency is increased too, thus the push to transition to MOSFET-based technology.

PS: Rode round-trip just over 700 miles this weekend and the burned Relay connector and pins replaced last weekend worked flawlessly.
Battery stayed well-charged and bike ran great in ride temperatures ranging from 62F degrees up in the mountains to 105F yesterday on ride home 🌵
 

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I have a 2004 1100 Spirit with 94,000 miles on it with all the original charging components. I did have to solder the "3 yellow wires". I ran heated gloves and jacket liner in the winter. I did do the mod to add a relay s to limit the current through the starter switch, but that really didn't affect the charging. Yes, the regulator is a low technology shut device, but it lasted.
 

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Two issues:
1. Connector problems as discussed. Simplest solution is to eliminate the connector and solder the wires together. If you're hell bent on keeping a connector there, there is an upgrade connector kit available from Honda (I saw a vid on YouTube, I think the parts come from a Goldwing). I believe Honda had a Technical Bulletin on this for Shadows, your local Honda dealer should be able to help you with this.
2. Output of the stock stator is not great. If you're 100% stock you will be fine. Replacing incandescent bulbs with LEDs reduces the electrical load. When I bought my first Shadow (on my 4th now) I did a lot of research and decided to upgrade the stator because I used heated gloves and a heated jacket liner in the winter.

and yes, I agree Bentone has his own language. Magnetism is not relevant to the problem of heat buildup caused by resistance, other than the fact that all electrical current creates magnetism, but like I said, not relevant. The problem with resistance in an electrical connector carrying a fair amount of current is it's a cascading, or downward spiral phenomena. Some resistance causes heat. The heat makes the electrical connection worse which makes the resistance go up. Higher resistance increases the heat, which causes more resistance etc. etc. until the connection fails, or a fuse blows, or an electrical fire starts.
 
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