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I was thinking if your coolant had been properly filled and ‘burped’, the reservoir shouldn’t really play into things if it was overheating a few minutes after starting. But they’re right. You keep skipping around different issues and aren’t really answering questions about advice given.

You need to go back to the basics. So the bike isn’t revving properly. Does it sound sluggish to rev? Slow to drop back to idle? After all of this running with a heat issue, have you checked to see if there is any coolant in the oil from a warped head?
 

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1983 vt750c
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Usually just removing the mufflers will cause miner drivabiliy problems. remove/messing with the air box will cause MAJOR drivability issues and a rabbit hole you don't want to go down if you can avoid.
Just removing the airbox snorkel if it has one, will get you sputtering, reduced power, slow to rev, etc.
I can confirm with the quoted statement removing the stock air box and tunnel will cause many many problems with the carbs. When I removed mine I battled with carb issues for a year until I 3d printed a solution. If you already removed the stock air box and can't re install or don't want to re install then id recommend attaching the tunnel and figuring out a way to connect a filter i had to design a pipe to connect to the stock tunnel that then connects to a pod filter. If you want i can print one for you and send it over wont cost much. I have a thread with photos on general discussion if you want to check it out.
 

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Discussion Starter #43
I don't know if my replies are not showing, or people are not reading them thoroughly. I did mention that I had crossed wired the tachometer, which I corrected after I was suggested to check the wiring. And I also changed the reservoir canister based on the suggestion. So the issue of over heating is fixed.

But now it's after firing. But I don't think that the back firing can be related to the air box as the air box was removed prior to the over heating issue. The carbs were rebuilt, and pilot screw adjusted prior to the over heating issue. And it was running fine except the over heating which could have been due to crossed wiring or the previous reservoir canister.

I am attaching some photos of the air system that I am currently using. I am using the stock tunnel and the stock element holder and its foam, which kind of is restricting the air flow. And this was all done prior to the over heating and after firing issues.
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You just have a lot of posts, and they’re intermixed. Okay, so overheat is out of the way. For this next part, I would remove the air box completely. Troubleshoot and ’tune’ for the open carbs, then adjust after the air intake is reinstalled.

For instance, I asked ‘how’ the bike wasn’t revving properly, and you replied about your tach, the reservoir and your air intake... everything except an answer to my question! 😉
 

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Discussion Starter #45
You just have a lot of posts, and they’re intermixed. Okay, so overheat is out of the way. For this next part, I would remove the air box completely. Troubleshoot and ’tune’ for the open carbs, then adjust after the air intake is reinstalled.

For instance, I asked ‘how’ the bike wasn’t revving properly, and you replied about your tach, the reservoir and your air intake... everything except an answer to my question! 😉
I did reply to that, but I guess since I was working on the bike at the same time, I might not have clicked on the 'post' button.

Now, just to paint a better picture. There's a bit of bite smoke out of the exhaust initially when the motor fires up. And I am also assuming (if I may) that the over heat might have caused the rubber connector that's between carbs and the engine to expand and create a vacuum leak.
 

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Discussion Starter #46 (Edited)
Updates on the after fire.
I fired up the bike on open carbs, let it warm up. At first when I would cover the left side carb mouth with my hand (not fully covering it) the bike revved up, but when I did the same thing to the right side, the rmp dropped.
I put back the air box and took it for a round, it didn't after fire much. Now after the bike is warm, When I try to cover the right side carb mouth, it reves up. But when I do the same to the left side carb, there's a suction and I get fuel on my hand. And left side exhaust is not as hot as the right side.
And I have to keep the throttle idle screw way turned up to maintain the rpm on 1000
 

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Did you sync the carbs?
You want both throttles opening at the same time.
 
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Discussion Starter #48
Did you sync the carbs?
You want both throttles opening at the same time.
No, I did not sync the carbs. I didn't separate the two carbs when I opened them to clean them.
But I found the problem. There's a vacuum leak in one of the intake boots.
I had some PL construction glue at hand that I used, and it fixed the problem for the time. I will open it up tomorrow after work and see if I can seal it with something. Any suggestions?
 

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Don’t you just love problems that move around? White smoke at startup can be one of two things, condensation burning out of the exhaust, or you’re leaking a little coolant into the cylinder which then burns off. Which boot was leaking? Left side exhaust being cooler could be that coolant leak, or a much richer mixture. It’s a pain, but you need to find and solve the issue of each carb/cylinder first. Then make sure they’re synced.
 

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Discussion Starter #50 (Edited)
Don’t you just love problems that move around? White smoke at startup can be one of two things, condensation burning out of the exhaust, or you’re leaking a little coolant into the cylinder which then burns off. Which boot was leaking? Left side exhaust being cooler could be that coolant leak, or a much richer mixture. It’s a pain, but you need to find and solve the issue of each carb/cylinder first. Then make sure they’re synced.
As I have said it, I am becoming a better mechanic with this bike than a rider. I am hoping it's not a coolant leak. It's the left boot that has the leak. And when I covered up where it seemed to be leaking from, I had both sides running equally warm, and that fixed the after firing issue to a certain level. So I am assuming, and hoping that it's just that boot leak that's causing all the current issues.
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There should be no coolant at the carb boots. Unless the cylinder is full of coolant, or running down from above. That may be someones sealer on there.
 

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Discussion Starter #52 (Edited)
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This is where the core of my problem lies. Well, at least it's not a coolant leak, eh!✌
Could JB weld fix this?🤷🏽‍♂️
 

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You could try jb, if you going to keep the bike for a while I would consider another head.
 

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Discussion Starter #54
You could try jb, if you going to keep the bike for a while I would consider another head.
I don't want to spend much on this bike, as I got this just to get back in practice of riding. But ever since I've got it, I am more practicing mechanics on it. I made a secondary lip for it, and JB weld the hell out of it. Let's see if it holds.
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View attachment 289108 This is where the core of my problem lies. Well, at least it's not a coolant leak, eh!✌
Could JB weld fix this?🤷🏽‍♂️
You either need a cylinder head or a really experienced TIG welder that’s stubborn enough to let you leave the head on and try the weld.

I would NOT JB weld that, you take a bad bump or something doesn’t cure right and you’re sucking chunks of metal into the cylinder and it’s only going to be ugly after that. Really ideally the head should be removed even for a weld repair on that part, this isn’t a “make it work” scenario this is a “fix it right or not at all” scenario.
 

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Discussion Starter #59
You either need a cylinder head or a really experienced TIG welder that’s stubborn enough to let you leave the head on and try the weld.

I would NOT JB weld that, you take a bad bump or something doesn’t cure right and you’re sucking chunks of metal into the cylinder and it’s only going to be ugly after that. Really ideally the head should be removed even for a weld repair on that part, this isn’t a “make it work” scenario this is a “fix it right or not at all” scenario.
I understand what you say, but welding or getting a new head for it is way out of my budget. What I noticed is that the part was broken before, and the previous owner glued it back with some sort sealant. At least I made a secondary lip for it, and it's stuck pretty tight.
Let's see how long it lasts.
 

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I understand what you say, but welding or getting a new head for it is way out of my budget. What I noticed is that the part was broken before, and the previous owner glued it back with some sort sealant. At least I made a secondary lip for it, and it's stuck pretty tight.
Let's see how long it lasts.
I wish you the best, I’ve made some pretty ill-advised JB weld repairs in my day, just know that they’re always going to be temporary fixes. When your funds allow it, I would highly suggest you put replacing that head casting as the top of your list. The head casting itself isn’t too expensive to find used at all, the gaskets you’ll need to replace during the job will probably cost more.

 
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