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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all, I'm working on putting my engine back together and I'm wondering how I can find the correct spot for timing on the crankshaft. Manual says the mark is right behind the cap on the cover but I cant get my cap off for the life of me. Are there not any timing marks on the inside? Any thoughts on how to get my timing cap off the cover? I've tried hammering, screw driver, pliers, nothing is working.
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I tried to get mine off too, NO GO, and didn't want to ruin it.
Maybe get another one and rip it out?
It IS supposed to just unscrew !
Since you can't change the ignition timing it isn't a major thing to check when running again.
If it is the cam chain timing, get the cylinder up to TDC and set the gear according to the manual..
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I tried to get mine off too, NO GO, and didn't want to ruin it.
Maybe get another one and rip it out?
It IS supposed to just unscrew !
Since you can't change the ignition timing it isn't a major thing to check when running again.
If it is the cam chain timing, get the cylinder up to TDC and set the gear according to the manual..
Yeah I'm putting the cam shafts back in. I will try doing TDC just seems like it would be easy to be off a tooth that way
 

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A heat gun sounds like a good approach to use expansion of the outer case to free things up.

It is probably aluminum oxide build up on the threads, that stuff is super hard and takes up space.
Penetrating oil won't touch it, but household ammonia will dissolve it, if you can get it in the crack and let it sit for a while.
The drawback to this approach is that is will tend to darken the surrounding aluminum and the awful ammonia smell, which will upset cats, who will then attempt to bury your bike and/or scent mark it.
I have used the method on other stuck aluminum parts and it worked, but I have not tried it on this specific problem myself.

I have also heard that ethylene glycol brake fluid or antifreeze can breakdown the oxide, but I have not tried it, but it might be worth a shot as it is nicer smelling than ammonia.

If you get it out, clean it and grease the hell out of it, before reinstalling.

Later VT750 bikes have a similar plug with a large Allen wrench hole rather than a slot, I don't know if they are threaded the same, but it might be something to check out.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I tried heating it up and no luck. I ended up just beating the **** out of it with a hammer and chisel. It turned out, it's still functional but not pretty lol.

In y'alls opinion, does it look like I have the rear cylinder a tooth off?
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here's the front for comparison
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Roll the crank back to the correct position and see what the cam position looks like then.
The crank is always right, the cam position is relative to it.
A whole tooth is quite a chunk to be out, so at the cam it should be obvious if it is so.
The cam timing tends to get a little retarded over time as the cam chain wears and that might be a slight contributing factor.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Roll the crank back to the correct position and see what the cam position looks like then.
The crank is always right, the cam position is relative to it.
A whole tooth is quite a chunk to be out, so at the cam it should be obvious if it is so.
The cam timing tends to get a little retarded over time as the cam chain wears and that might be a slight contributing factor.
Ok I did that. Not a professional but I think it's off just one tooth. But I dont know.
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Discussion Starter #10
Well I moved it a tooth and it was even more off in the other direction so I put it back since it seemed way closer. Must be play from somewhere. I ordered a gasket kit, but for some reason it didnt come with the gaskets for the split heads. The gasket that goes between the valve springs/ cam side and the rocker arm half. Seems like I will have to use some sort of RTV? It's almost like there was no gasket there to begin with.
 

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Glad you eliminated the possibility of a cam timing error.
These earlier 750 engines are not really my thing, but I can't see there being any sealant or gasket in there as the two halves form the bearings for the camshaft to run in, has to be metal and on metal.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Glad you eliminated the possibility of a cam timing error.
These earlier 750 engines are not really my thing, but I can't see there being any sealant or gasket in there as the two halves form the bearings for the camshaft to run in, has to be metal and on metal.
I did some more digging in the book and it says to use a liquid gasket.
 

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I did some more digging in the book and it says to use a liquid gasket.
Be careful not to use too much then, just a thin layer as most of it will squeeze out and you don't need it getting into places it shouldn't.
I've seen freshly built engines quickly die from people using silicone RTV like toothpaste.
 
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