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Discussion Starter #1
I started the rebuilding process to straighten out the tranny problems with my Shadow. After about 4 hours of work, the motor is off and resting comfortably on a work table. Next week the engine comes apart. I will be taking pictures and will be posting them if anyone wants to check out the process. It will involve taking the engine apart and splitting the cases to get to the gears.
If anyone else has done this gig, let me know. I'm a pretty good wrench twister, and the guy helping is great mechanic, but neither of us has ever torn a Japanese motor down.

Wish us luck :)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Well, the day of disassembly arrived on Saturday. After about 5 hours and MANY references to the Clymer book, most of the Shadow's engine internals are now resting comfortably in about 25 freezer bags, each marked with where the parts, nuts, bolts, fasteners came from.
Once the case was split (a delicate task considering what you're dealing with) we got the tranny out and started looking for problems. (why it wouldn't stay in 3rd or 4th) Nothing obvious presented itself. The wear on one shift fork is out of spec, but nothing glaring. The shift drum shows no wear and we used a dial indicator to check the grooves. About 3 thousanths of play compared to the pins on the forks.
If anybody has any insights I would appreciate it. At this point all I can really do is replace the shift forks and put it all back together.

Mark
 

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MarktheMoose said:
Well, the day of disassembly arrived on Saturday. After about 5 hours and MANY references to the Clymer book, most of the Shadow's engine internals are now resting comfortably in about 25 freezer bags, each marked with where the parts, nuts, bolts, fasteners came from.
Once the case was split (a delicate task considering what you're dealing with) we got the tranny out and started looking for problems. (why it wouldn't stay in 3rd or 4th) Nothing obvious presented itself. The wear on one shift fork is out of spec, but nothing glaring. The shift drum shows no wear and we used a dial indicator to check the grooves. About 3 thousanths of play compared to the pins on the forks.
If anybody has any insights I would appreciate it. At this point all I can really do is replace the shift forks and put it all back together.

Mark
Jumping out of gear is rarely the shift drum!
And its not really the shift forks that cause it, they do get damaged by the gears jumping out.
Look at the engagement dogs (dowel's) that are on the side of the gears. If the ends of the dowel's are not flat (have rounded corners) then that is the problem. Now if you find any that is rounded off, then be sure to check its mating gear and make sure that the dowel's slotes have sharp defined edges.
The gears that are probably bad will be the ones that has the worse shift fork conditions.
Remember, the engagement dogs DO NOT have to be broken!, only rounded off.
MarkC
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the advise. One of the gears was showing some damage to the dogs.
I'll be sure to do a more thorough inspection asap

Mark
 

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I had the same problem on my 85 VT1100. I rebuilt the tranny last year. You can't get new gears. At first I made the mistake of buying used gears off EBay. They were just as bad as my orginal gears. After puttting it all back together I was some pissed the problem was still there.

Send the tranny to FastbyGas in Buffalo. They'll undercut the gears and the tranny will be good as new. For $300 its well worth the money.

The biggest problem I had was doing the valve adjustment with the hydralic lifters. I hope you marked which hole they came from - I didn't and spent hours doing a valve adjustment.

If you search under my user name you'll find lots of postings about my tranny rebuilds. I still have a few engine gaskets if you need them for the cost of postage.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The saga continues, new gear is not available. So on to plan B.

Last Saturday, we set up a drill press as a milling machine and got to work on the beat up third gear. Noticed the casting of the gear itself left a ramped edge on the dogs. This could be why this problem seems common in the old Shadows. Application of horsepower to the gear would tend to force the engaging dogs to ride up. Eventually the edges get knocked off and you lose the gear as soon as you apply power.
After a couple hours of careful work, we have machined the damaged dogs and squared them up nicely. Checked with a micrometer and all are within a couple thousanths. Going to put it back together as soon as I get a replacement washer that was MISSING. Looks like somebody was in this motor before and didn't wonder why there were spare parts. The pictures of the gear afterwards came out blurry, gonna have to reshoot.

Mark
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Here are a few shots of the process.






That's not me in the picture, it's my ace mechanic/machinist
 

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vt 1100 jumping out of 3rd gear

I have vt1100 jumping out of 3rd gear, now the problem is resolved.
I have Haynes manual and the 1st problem was how to split the engine.
Hynes did not saying that there is a screw holding wire for pulse sensors, and when I unscrew bolt and oil pump, with all other bolts, I could split the engine.
The 3rd gear dogs and middle gear shift were worn.I solved this problem with laser welding and grinding the right amount. Now the transmission is working o.k.:eek:
Sorry, but Haynes manual have some failures also with FT and RT timing settings.
To all bike fans
 
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