Honda Shadow Forums banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm 19 and just bought my first bike the guy I bought it from said it just needed carbs done. I followed a very detailed tutorial on youtube to rebuild the carb with a kit. I put it back in and now my bike isnt starting I have fuel I have spark and it starts on starting fluid but then does. Not sure what the problem is so any help is appreciated I'm trying to learn how to work on this stuff.
 

·
Registered
1983 Honda vt750 Shadow
Joined
·
16,207 Posts
The older bikes will crank but not fire if the kill switch is OFF.
Flip it back and forth a few times in case the contacts are dirty.
But if you have spark then it is OK.
Fuel valve on and fuel pump connected?
Try to get it going and shut it off and drain the float bowls at the drain screws and see if 1 or 2 ounces of fuel runs out.
 
  • Like
Reactions: KiwiRider

·
Registered
2001 Valkyrie I/S
Joined
·
6,168 Posts
If it starts with starting fluid then I doubt your getting enough fuel. One way to check is to open the drains on the carb bowls and see how much fuel comes out. It's not uncommon for even the most experienced to have to pull the carbs a second or third time.
 
  • Like
Reactions: KiwiRider

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The older bikes will crank but not fire if the kill switch is OFF.
Flip it back and forth a few times in case the contacts are dirty.
But if you have spark then it is OK.
Fuel valve on and fuel pump connected?
Try to get it going and shut it off and drain the float bowls at the drain screws and see if 1 or 2 ounces of fuel runs out.
how do I drain the float bowl
 

·
Registered
2001 Valkyrie I/S
Joined
·
6,168 Posts
On the bottom of the float bowl there should be a screw sticking out the side, that should be the drain. You can download a manual for your ride here.

That should help you.
 
  • Like
Reactions: KiwiRider

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
On the bottom of the float bowl there should be a screw sticking out the side, that should be the drain. You can download a manual for your ride here.

That should help you.
I drained the float bowls and I'd say it was about an ounce and a half that came out
 

·
Registered
'83 VT750C
Joined
·
1,044 Posts
While you can learn a lot of stuff through tutorials and videos, carburetor work is something of an art form. You will do better if you 'feel' it, and even experienced mechanics have often had a 'carb guy' they immediately took any carburetors to. Conversely, you can get a leg up on it by learning ALL you can about carburetor operation. Once you learn it inside and out, you'll find it a little easier to troubleshoot. There are quite a few different things that need to work in concert for air and fuel to mix properly.
 

·
Registered
2001 Valkyrie I/S
Joined
·
6,168 Posts
I drained the float bowls and I'd say it was about an ounce and a half that came out
That should be enough fuel so I would recheck your spark also need to make sure you have enough output from your battery as your starting it. If the voltage drops below 10v while turning the starter it wouldn't supply enough to get a good spark to ignite the fuel in the cylinders. Have you tried jumping with a spare car battery?
 
  • Like
Reactions: KiwiRider

·
Registered
1983 Honda vt750 Shadow
Joined
·
16,207 Posts
Sounds like a vacuum leak at the boots or any other source of vacuum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,839 Posts
Sorry I'm late to the thread. I know these bikes and just love how the carbs are mounted, especially the air-box that is part of the frame!

A tip that's saved me a considerable amount of effort with the boots between the air box and the carbs is to get a cheap hair dryer, NOT a paint-stripping gun or similar but just a hair dryer, and heat them up a bit before working with them. They can slide up into the air-box out of the way, but I've found it easier to remove them. I'm assuming yours is the Californian model with lots of extra annoying tubing around, so you will need to be taking things out from the left side of the bike.

When I started wrenching, I did as you did and got an old cheap bike and started tinkering. I still remember when I learned how a clutch worked (no youtube back then), and all sorts of fun quirks with carbs (got the float needle in wrong my first time too!). I have no paper qualifications, have done almost no courses or study (and the last one I did was in '91!), but I am now being paid to fix bikes for people.

It can be very rewarding to learn to do stuff yourself, especially at your age and especially with older vehicles. These skills become transferable later as well, to all sorts of things.

When you get her going right, have fun and treat her reasonable well. A little maintenance here and there, and you will be surprised how quickly the numbers climb on that clock, and how many years of fun you can get out of her!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Sorry I'm late to the thread. I know these bikes and just love how the carbs are mounted, especially the air-box that is part of the frame!

A tip that's saved me a considerable amount of effort with the boots between the air box and the carbs is to get a cheap hair dryer, NOT a paint-stripping gun or similar but just a hair dryer, and heat them up a bit before working with them. They can slide up into the air-box out of the way, but I've found it easier to remove them. I'm assuming yours is the Californian model with lots of extra annoying tubing around, so you will need to be taking things out from the left side of the bike.

When I started wrenching, I did as you did and got an old cheap bike and started tinkering. I still remember when I learned how a clutch worked (no youtube back then), and all sorts of fun quirks with carbs (got the float needle in wrong my first time too!). I have no paper qualifications, have done almost no courses or study (and the last one I did was in '91!), but I am now being paid to fix bikes for people.

It can be very rewarding to learn to do stuff yourself, especially at your age and especially with older vehicles. These skills become transferable later as well, to all sorts of things.

When you get her going right, have fun and treat her reasonable well. A little maintenance here and there, and you will be surprised how quickly the numbers climb on that clock, and how many years of fun you can get out of her!
I've got it running but at this point it back firing,after firing, blows smoke in first and jumps in rpms when it's leaned left or right in neutral or when putting it on the kick stand I'm just at a loss of what to do at this point
 

·
Registered
'83 VT750C
Joined
·
1,044 Posts
Well, it‘s one step forward. Now tackle everything else as it comes. From the ‘leaning’ thing, I’d say your float valves are sticking, and too much gas is getting through. Do you still have the tank off?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Well, it‘s one step forward. Now tackle everything else as it comes. From the ‘leaning’ thing, I’d say your float valves are sticking, and too much gas is getting through. Do you still have the tank off?
no i put it back on when i thought everything was good, it was fine for a day or so but when I started it the other day it was just sputtering
 

·
Registered
'83 VT750C
Joined
·
1,044 Posts
Yeah. I’m a pessimist, so I always make sure things are REALLY running well before I tighten that last bolt! Well, off with the tank again. You’ll be practiced at it, at least! 😉

Before that, you can try tapping the sides of your float bowls with a wrench handle or something. That can sometimes free them up...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Yea it's starting fine now just sputters a bit until it warms up fully trying to work on the rear brakes when I got it the adjuster was maxed out the pads look good Donna replace them anyway and see what happens
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,839 Posts
Yea it's starting fine now just sputters a bit until it warms up fully trying to work on the rear brakes when I got it the adjuster was maxed out the pads look good Donna replace them anyway and see what happens
Check the diameter of the drums as well, it could be them that are worn. According to the manual the "service limit" for the ID of the drum is 181mm or 7.13", and the pad thickness is a minimum of 2mm/0.08". Also check the alignment with the pedal.

My bike needs to come out of the garage right now, so I shall take the camera out and check something...

There's alignment marks on the brake lever and the 'pin' that it cranks, likewise on the pushrod and the 'pin' on the brake hub :
293932


As you can see here, my rear alignment is not to 'factory spec'. I honestly cannot recall if a) I wanted the pedal a bit lower and/or B I had an issue similar to yours. Either way, I still have at least an inch on my adjuster. Not certain how much brake pad is left though.
293933



Do you have a manual for the bike? I've uploaded mine on here somewhere, plus I think another one or two are around. If not, ask, and I can get that issue rectified forthwith :)

As to the sputtering, it perhaps depends on how cold it is there. Could be one of your chokes isn't quite engaging properly, so only one cylinder is doing any real work. Could be one isn't engaging and one only partial, which would be worse :) What sort of air temperatures are you seeing at present? If it's still quite frozen I wouldn't worry about it much, if it's decent warms days that's another issue.

Glad she's running, and you're getting out to enjoy her (at least I hope you're getting out some!).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I've got the brakes working I never even realized there was alignment marks I had put it on way off and it's average 65° around here
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top