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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
I read a recent (2020) article that interviewed the Motul Oil guru. Can't find it now. His Answers were all logical and as expected, favoring the ester oils as generally being best of course. However, he did specifically say that if your bike had Dino oil all along, its probably best to stick with that due to seals. He clearly said that synthetic would clear the micro weaknesses out of the seals and potentially cause leaks. At nearly 60,000 miles on this bike, I am leaning towards just sticking with some kind of Dino. Might experiment with a jug of Maxima semi synth I bought. It's ester group V on the synth side.

P.S I drained the old oil last week put in cheap Castrol GO! for storage. My other thread describes a leak that developed soon after a few light short runs. If its one of the issues mentioned there, so much for prevention. I am still hoping its just the drain plug washer that I didn't replace. Hope springs eternal!
 

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If you didn't put the washer on, wait till spring. Put a cup under it to catch drips. Put the washer on before you ride it however. You'd be surprised how much you can lose when riding it like that. I use Mobil V twin synthetic in my '98 1100, Works great and shifts smooth as silk.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
If you didn't put the washer on, wait till spring. Put a cup under it to catch drips. Put the washer on before you ride it however. You'd be surprised how much you can lose when riding it like that. I use Mobil V twin synthetic in my '98 1100, Works great and shifts smooth as silk.
Ok thanks that gives me permission to be lazy cause it’s starting to snow if it’s just a washer. What mileage do you have on it and when did the bike make the switch to synthetic? Oh ya and what grade of Mobil V twin?
 

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Ok thanks that gives me permission to be lazy cause it’s starting to snow if it’s just a washer. What mileage do you have on it and when did the bike make the switch to synthetic? Oh ya and what grade of Mobil V twin?
I use Mobil1 synthetic 20w-50. It is cheap insurance. Semi-synthetic is fossil based oil mixed with synthetic oil. So I don't waste my money on that because I can make that in the garage. Marketing ploy. It's like telling you Thomas's muffins have to split with a fork. Doesn't make sense. I bought a '98 vt1100 ace a few months ago with 9000 mi. I used synthetic in the last two Hondas I owned and they ran great. From what I have read synthetic will not cause you to start losing oil.
 

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A high mileage bike w/o knowing its FULL history of maintenance/care, I suggest staying with dino oil and I sure as heck wouldn't use 20w-50. Your oil is your bikes blood and think of it like its your own blood. Why would you use it in a watercooled bike anyway? Use Honda OEM spec oil chart. They designed this bike. Look at how thin oil is getting in vehicles nowadays with HP out the arse. Kinda dispels the use of heavier oils unless the motor needs it like big air cooled v twins per manufacturer's spec. Now if I lived in the AZ or other warm climates like it then maybe 20w-50.

I use synthetic exclusively on all my last 3 rides. The ZR7 5300 mi., VT1100C 2800 mi., and 13,000 on the Valk which are 300,000+ mi. motors. Basically none of them weren't really broken in except the ZR7. All of them were newer or had been ridden enough to keep the seals in good condition and stored properly.
 

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Semi-synthetic is fossil based oil mixed with synthetic oil. So I don't waste my money on that because I can make that in the garage. Marketing ploy. It's like telling you Thomas's muffins have to split with a fork. Doesn't make sense.
There is also a group of oils known as ‘Group 3’, and are often labelled as Synthetic, but are just regular oils put through a high-temperature process called ‘Cracking’. Their performance is on par with ’true’ Synthetic oils, though.
 

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A high mileage bike w/o knowing its FULL history of maintenance/care, I suggest staying with dino oil and I sure as heck wouldn't use 20w-50. Your oil is your bikes blood and think of it like its your own blood. Why would you use it in a watercooled bike anyway? Use Honda OEM spec oil chart. They designed this bike. Look at how thin oil is getting in vehicles nowadays with HP out the arse. Kinda dispels the use of heavier oils unless the motor needs it like big air cooled v twins per manufacturer's spec. Now if I lived in the AZ or other warm climates like it then maybe 20w-50.

I use synthetic exclusively on all my last 3 rides. The ZR7 5300 mi., VT1100C 2800 mi., and 13,000 on the Valk which are 300,000+ mi. motors. Basically none of them weren't really broken in except the ZR7. All of them were newer or had been ridden enough to keep the seals in good condition and stored properly.
I live in Florida. I drive this thing all year long. When it is over 100 in August I need a higher weight oil. Besides, I just told him what I used. I didn't tell him to use it.
 

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I live in Florida. I drive this thing all year long. When it is over 100 in August I need a higher weight oil. Besides, I just told him what I used. I didn't tell him to use it.
I will add this. This is cut and paste from another web page. Info only. I left the authors name on it for copyright purposes.
Does synthetic oil cause leaks?
The facts — Does synthetic oil cause leaks?
Synthetic does not cause oil leaks?
No, switching to synthetic oil will not cause leaks unless your engine was already leaking oil.
Back when synthetic oil was introduced to the public, owners complained that their engines leaked oil. They blamed the switch to synthetic oil and from that point on, it became a well-known “fact” that switching from conventional to synthetic motor oil caused your engine to leak. But here’s what was really going on.
Synthetic oil was designed for racing
Racing oils don’t contain detergents, dispersants, seal conditioning additives, or anti-corrosion additives. Why? Well, the answer is two-fold. First, they don’t need those additives because the oil in race cars is changed after every race. Second, because those additives take up space. A quart of oil is actually about 75% oil and 25% additives. If you don’t need the additives, and you really need the lubrication, why not get rid of the additives?
The problem came into play when owners started using those early synthetic racing oils in their daily drivers. The lack of seal conditioners and the fact that the oil flowed better at cold startup caused hardened seals to leak oil. That’s where the story got started.

Today’s synthetic oils contain all the necessary additives to prevent leaks.
If your engine wasn’t leaking oil before you switch to synthetic, it won’t leak after the switch. However, if your seals and gaskets were already leaking, switching to synthetic may cause them to leak even more, but only during a cold startup.
©, 2021 Rick Muscoplat
 

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I live in Florida. I drive this thing all year long. When it is over 100 in August I need a higher weight oil. Besides, I just told him what I used. I didn't tell him to use it.
I am sure your 20W50 is OK in Florida. Although that 20 is a bit tough on cold starts, you may need the 50 (although 40 is good over 100F). The OP is in Canada so I advised to stay with 10W40 as it has better "cold" starting abilities and can handle typical high temp.
 

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I am sure your 20W50 is OK in Florida. Although that 20 is a bit tough on cold starts, you may need the 50 (although 40 is good over 100F). The OP is in Canada so I advised to stay with 10W40 as it has better "cold" starting abilities and can handle typical high temp.
I am going to ask you to read this What Exactly Do The Multi-Visc Designations Mean? | Bel-Ray (belray.com) and I am going to paste a chart
Rectangle Font Parallel Slope Number

I remember reading why there wasn't a 10W-50 or a bigger range of numbers once. Something about the chemistry did not work. Read what you want from different sources and make your own decision on what you need.
 

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...
I remember reading why there wasn't a 10W-50 or a bigger range of numbers once. Something about the chemistry did not work....
The article is agreeing with my posts: From the article: "This means that when your engine is cold the lower the W number the easier the oil will flow." and that is why I stated "20 is a bit tough on cold starts." Notice in your chart, ALL the oils function at ambient temperatures above 100F because the operating temp of the engine is above 100F. The more critical number is when cold as indicated on the left side of the chart.
With mutligrade oils such as 10W40 the oil is a 10 with viscosity index improvers (VII) that have the oil perform within the spec of a 40 when at operating temperature. The problem with trying to get a 10W50 is you are using so much VII, you increase shearing so the oil does not stay in spec long. Plus costly, Plus almost no one needs it. Most modern engines designers are looking at lower viscosity oils with many (such as Honda autos) going with 0W20 because less VII and greater temperature range:

Rectangle Font Parallel Slope Number
 

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I think the biggest problem concerning choosing an oil is all of the urban legends and general misunderstandings.

I am no oil expert and learned a lot about oil after I got my bike five years ago. Why would a manufacturer go to all the trouble of designing and testing a engine that is going to be used in all of North America and state recommend viscosity oils but disregard “better weight oil”. They know what they are doing.

I am still not sure about 0W20 oil but if I purchase a newer vehicle and that’s what it calls for then that is what I will put in it.

Eric


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IMHO, The 0W20 is more for fuel mileage ratings than better protection. It takes less HP to pump the lighter weight oil. And anyone who has manually primed an oil pump on a rebuild knows just how hard it is to pump a straight 20 or 30w break-in oil. That said, I've been running 0W30 full synthetic in my car for the last 140k miles. I'm pretty sure if you get the shop manuals for newer and older vehicles, the crank and rod bearing clearances are going to be the same? (guessing here)

In their favor, the lighter oils being easier to pump means they circulate faster on startup which is when a lot if not most engine wear happens. I seem to remember thinking the oil light was going out quicker on start-ups after switching from 10W40 to 0W30 in the car. That was a long time ago.

And there's a 0W16 out now...(not MA or MA2 rated)
 

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IMHO, The 0W20 is more for fuel mileage ratings than better protection.
The 0 is going to protect the engine better on startup with better flow capabilities. In an engine designed to operate with a 20 you have less drag so again better protection. The 0W20 needs much less VII so less shear. The problem is that as engines improve and oils improve, they must be synchronized so you cannnot use the "best " oil in an engine not designed for it unless you dont require reliability.
 
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