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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I figured my bike has 13,000 miles on it and I don't think the valves were adjusted by the previous owner. So, I have the service manual and figured I would ajdust the valves and sync the carbs.

So I removed the carbs, and the cylinder heads. I adjusted the intake to 0.005" and exhaust to 0.007". The flywheel notch was on FT for the front, and RT for the rear, when adjusting the cylinder.

For the rear I had to back the screw out alot to get the required clearance. I made sure the rear was on RT. I put everything back together and now they are ticking. I went back and checked them today, ripped the bike apart again and, made sure they were real snug with the 0.005" for the intake and 0.007" for the exhaust (those are the minimum clearances).

I did not have any ticking prior to this. Is there something I missed? Any ideas what to do?

Thanks guys!
 

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e-roc said:
So I figured my bike has 13,000 miles on it and I don't think the valves were adjusted by the previous owner. So, I have the service manual and figured I would ajdust the valves and sync the carbs.

So I removed the carbs, and the cylinder heads. I adjusted the intake to 0.005" and exhaust to 0.007". The flywheel notch was on FT for the front, and RT for the rear, when adjusting the cylinder.

For the rear I had to back the screw out alot to get the required clearance. I made sure the rear was on RT. I put everything back together and now they are ticking. I went back and checked them today, ripped the bike apart again and, made sure they were real snug with the 0.005" for the intake and 0.007" for the exhaust (those are the minimum clearances).

I did not have any ticking prior to this. Is there something I missed? Any ideas what to do?

Thanks guys!
A couple o f things...check the boots around the carb to make sure everything is connected properly.

Does the tick change with rpms?

I would recommend checking the clearances again. It sounds like you have one that is too loose...if the noise isn't coming from an intake air leak.

Joe
 

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Joe and e-roc, never done top-end servicing on my VT1100, but its got 30k and I'm thinking it might be a good idea, and get me some experience. How challenging is it? do i need anything other than a standard tool set? Is it necessary?

I figure those valves haven't been adjusted in years.

e-roc, update us if you figure out the problem with that ticking!

-Jonny
 

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JonnyP said:
Joe and e-roc, never done top-end servicing on my VT1100, but its got 30k and I'm thinking it might be a good idea, and get me some experience. How challenging is it? do i need anything other than a standard tool set? Is it necessary?

I figure those valves haven't been adjusted in years.

e-roc, update us if you figure out the problem with that ticking!

-Jonny
You don't have to worry about it on your 1100. They had hydraulic lifters. No adjustment needed. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
i will double check all the carb and intake boots to make sure they are seated correctly. I will check if the tick changes with rpms. I will check the boots and start it up tonight.

i am positive i did it on the compresion stroke. i followed the service manual's instructions to put the flywheel mark on the FT for the front cylinder then rotated it to the RT for the rear cylinder. Unless something is messed up with the flywheel!

thanks for your help!
 

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e-roc said:
i will double check all the carb and intake boots to make sure they are seated correctly. I will check if the tick changes with rpms. I will check the boots and start it up tonight.

i am positive i did it on the compresion stroke. i followed the service manual's instructions to put the flywheel mark on the FT for the front cylinder then rotated it to the RT for the rear cylinder. Unless something is messed up with the flywheel!

thanks for your help!
just because you are on the FT OR RT mark doesnt mean you are on the
compression stroke. try rotating 360 deg. and check the lash.
 

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Since the tappets wear with time, the gap increases, rather than decreasing. If you had to back the tappet off a lot of get the right clearance, I think you had the flywheel 360 degrees off. If anything, you should have had to turn the tappet in to take up space!

When I set the valve lash, I set the flywheel to where it's supposed to be, and then wiggle the rockers by hand to make sure there is some free play. If there is, then I know that I have it on the compression stroke. If it feels like it is under pressure at all, I turn the crank another 360. Tappets always wear toward a wider gap, never a closer one. (At least not when checking it cold, like you're supposed to!) This assures that the rockers will wiggle when you're on the right stroke.

--Justin
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
yeah i figured if i had to back off the on the clearance, something was up. Yeah, I adjusted this when the bike was cold. I went back out and started it up with the intake on, and still ticking. The carbs are all seated correctly and the hoses are all attached firmly.

On the rear cylinder, I put the mark to RT, and backed off on the clearance alot. I guess I should have not done that. So if I rotate the flywheel another 360 degrees, wont that put me right back at RT and it have the same gap? Or am I missing something here with the strokes? Or does it take 4 rotations of the flywheel for a full set of cycles, because its a 4 cycle motor? So once I find the location on RT where the rocker wiggles...that means i am on the compression?

Sorry for the noob-ness, I appreciate all of your help!
 

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tubes_rock said:
Tappets always wear toward a wider gap, never a closer one. (At least not when checking it cold, like you're supposed to!)
I don't think he really has to worry about it at only 13,000 miles, but
the gap doesn't always get wider.

It depends on which wears more... If the valve seat is wearing more,
the gap will get tighter (more likely on higher mileage engines).
When the seat or valve itself wears, it comes up higher in the guide
and takes up the gap.
 

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>>For the rear I had to back the screw out alot to get the required clearance.

Define alot. If you mean several turns, then it does sound like the crank was off 360 deg, at least for the rear. If you mean 1/4 to 1/2 a turn or so, then it could be that the valve was tight. When I adjusted mine, I never had to turn the adjusters more than 1/4 turn to get them within spec.

How does the bike run? Does it make good power? If so, and the noise is just a light ticking, I would not worry about it. A little ticking is better than no noise at all, which could mean they're too tight. Still, you may want to check them "one more time" just to be SURE the pistons were at TDC.

This comes up alot in this forum. Everybody thinks that if the valvetrain is quiet, all is well. That is not necessarily the case. I agree with Litnin, it is possible for the clearances to decrease with wear. If that is happening, they will be real quiet until it's too late.

Good luck!
 

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Right, Litnin. I know that in theory the valve seats can wear faster, I just have never run across it on anything I've ever worked on. Of course, when I started working on things, unleaded fuel and hardened cylinder heads were all I got my hands on (except for the 1949 John deere that you could practically adjust the valve lash with a matchbook cover and call it good enough!) so i never saw an engine that had the valve seats wear faster than the valve stems and tappets. But you are most certainly correct.

I guess it's hard to make a complete blanket statement about adjusting valves, but of all the bikes I've ever worked on, the gap always increased over the run period. Other folks' mileage (and experience) may vary.

But it's true, no tick is far worse. When there's no tick, it means that the valves are not completely closing. The only way that the valves have for cooling is to contact the cylinder head and dump their heat into it. If the valves don't close completely, (in addition to having lousy performance) they will burn up. A well tuned engine will have a slight (but not pronounced) tick to it. That' the sign of proper valve clearance.

--Justin
 

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e-roc said:
yeah i figured if i had to back off the on the clearance, something was up. Yeah, I adjusted this when the bike was cold. I went back out and started it up with the intake on, and still ticking. The carbs are all seated correctly and the hoses are all attached firmly.

On the rear cylinder, I put the mark to RT, and backed off on the clearance alot. I guess I should have not done that. So if I rotate the flywheel another 360 degrees, wont that put me right back at RT and it have the same gap? Or am I missing something here with the strokes? Or does it take 4 rotations of the flywheel for a full set of cycles, because its a 4 cycle motor? So once I find the location on RT where the rocker wiggles...that means i am on the compression?

Sorry for the noob-ness, I appreciate all of your help!
For every 360 degrees of crank rotation, the cam only turns 180 degrees, so one crank rotation brings the piston to TDC of the compression stroke, and another crank rotation brings the piston to TDC of the exhaust stroke. So it's very easy to get it one turn off. Show of hands....How many of us have put the distributer back in the small block 180 degrees off? My hand is up. :)
 

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When I adjust valves I have found that just watching the valves themselves allows you to find TDC. When they are both closed you know you found it. Do this for each cylinder and you are set. Also like what was said before, some ticking is good, silence is bad. And finally, depending on what kind of riding you do you might want to set the intake valve for the minimum clearance and the exhaust for the maximum. This will allow for the exhaust to be closed just slightly longer and be able to shed more heat thus increasing its longevity.
 

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I'm thinking Droy may have your solution, TDC COMPRESSION, closes both valves fully. There are other places where the valves are closed, but not both at the same time. There's only one place where both valves are fully closed and the cam will provide it's maximum clearance to both valves. I'm not intimately aquainted with these v-twins, so my advice would be bring each cylinder up to TDC on the COMPRESSION STROKE, as Droy has suggested.

Also, engine temperature makes a difference. The 'Oldtime Mechanics' taught me that quiet valves (the mechanically adjusted type) are living dangerously. You don't want them with a huge gap either.

John
 
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