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Hi all been lurking for awhile so decided I would join up and post. I was wondering for all those that bought their bikes brand new did you take it back after the break in period to get the valves adjusted or did you do it your self? I've rebuilt or fixed just about anything from antique tractors to my mustang and powerstroke diesels but for some reason I'm not keen on the idea of tearing into my bike maybe cause its my only new vehicle but just wondering how many have had them adjusted or just rode it the way it is

Thanks Aric
 

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Which bike do you have Aric?
 

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I might be wrong on this, but I thought the Spirit 750 had hydraulic lifters. I can check this weekend to make sure. I will let you know.

Joe
 

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Spirit_1100 said:
I might be wrong on this, but I thought the Spirit 750 had hydraulic lifters. I can check this weekend to make sure. I will let you know.

Joe
No, they're not hydraulic. MOM calls for an initial 600 mile check/adjustment but just about everyone I've talked to said this is unnecessary. The consensus seems to be that these modern motors are built to where they don't go out of spec as early (or as often) as the older ones. I have 3,800 miles on my '06 Spirit and plan on taking it into the shop for a valve check around 10K miles. Might get a few extra toys while I'm there. :wink:

All said, my next bike will be fuel injected, have hydraulic valves, belt drive & disk brakes on front & back. Bigger, too. And more expensive. Hate that part...
 

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obxmay said:
Spirit_1100 said:
I might be wrong on this, but I thought the Spirit 750 had hydraulic lifters. I can check this weekend to make sure. I will let you know.

Joe
No, they're not hydraulic. MOM calls for an initial 600 mile check/adjustment but just about everyone I've talked to said this is unnecessary. The consensus seems to be that these modern motors are built to where they don't go out of spec as early (or as often) as the older ones. I have 3,800 miles on my '06 Spirit and plan on taking it into the shop for a valve check around 10K miles. Might get a few extra toys while I'm there. :wink:

All said, my next bike will be fuel injected, have hydraulic valves, belt drive & disk brakes on front & back. Bigger, too. And more expensive. Hate that part...
CRAP...that means I should check Leslie's lifters. It is going to have to get a little warmer for me to do that. Damn weather in STL is damn cold for the next few days...and so is the garage. :D
 

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blueshadow05 said:
Thanks all yes the owners manual calls for adjustment at 600 miles but I wondered if it was nescesarry or not so thanks I'll let it go a little longer
You can go longer if the bike isn't making a lot of noise at idle or higher RPMs or running poorly.
 

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I'm taking this motorcycle mechanic class, and the professor who has riden all his life, used to be a tech guy, editor of a motorcycle tech magazine, and has taught the class for about 20 yrs now tells us that first 600 mile inspection is pretty important. However, if you feel that you want to go a little longer, what you should be listening/ watching for is your engine becoming more quite as well as better performance. These both might seem like good things, but it means that your valves need to be adjusted asap. The no noise from the valves, ex is slight constant ticks coming from the top of the engine when they are normal, means that the clearance has been lost so you are eroading the valves. The lack of noise is because the rocker arm or cam lobe, depending on what you have is able to acctuate the valve earlier allowing it to not have as much force. This less force hitting the valve makes it quite. The better performance comes b/c like I said above, the valve is opening earlier allowing for more overlap time of the intake and exhaust meaning that you are getting more fuel and air in, more exhaust out, allowing performance to increase. But this is due to increased wear on the valves themselves.

Nutshell: If clicking stops and/or performance increases get your valves adjusted.
 

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zerogs247 said:
I'm taking this motorcycle mechanic class, and the professor who has riden all his life, used to be a tech guy, editor of a motorcycle tech magazine, and has taught the class for about 20 yrs now tells us that first 600 mile inspection is pretty important. However, if you feel that you want to go a little longer, what you should be listening/ watching for is your engine becoming more quite as well as better performance. These both might seem like good things, but it means that your valves need to be adjusted asap. The no noise from the valves, ex is slight constant ticks coming from the top of the engine when they are normal, means that the clearance has been lost so you are eroading the valves. The lack of noise is because the rocker arm or cam lobe, depending on what you have is able to acctuate the valve earlier allowing it to not have as much force. This less force hitting the valve makes it quite. The better performance comes b/c like I said above, the valve is opening earlier allowing for more overlap time of the intake and exhaust meaning that you are getting more fuel and air in, more exhaust out, allowing performance to increase. But this is due to increased wear on the valves themselves.

Nutshell: If clicking stops and/or performance increases get your valves adjusted.
ExACTly!!! No disrespect, Spirit_1100, but this comes up occasionally on this forum, and invariably people will respond with "if the valves are quiet, they are OK". If the valves are wearing into the seats, clearance will decrease, as will the noise. It is entirely possible (not probable, but possible) to develop a burnt valve because it will no longer close completely, and the hot exhaust gasses can literally burn a notch into the valve or seat. $$$$$.

Keep your valves adjusted. That reminds me, I need to check mine. :D
 

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You're right on. Measure the clearance at TDC on the compression stroke. If you are going to be adjusting the clearance for normal street riding I would adjust as follows:

Minimum clearance allowed for intake valve.
Maximum clearance allowed for exhaust.

The maximum clearance on the exhaust allows the valve to be closed slightly longer allowing the valve to shed more of its heat each time it is closed thus extending it's life. However, since it is closed longer you will not be sheding as much exhaust so performance will go down very slightly, but for normal street riding, shouldn't even be noticeable.
 
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