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As mentioned in first thread, this is first street bike for me. Any advice for riding in big city? Bought a Phantom and live in Houston, TX.
 

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Got my first bike this year. An Aero 750. I ride from Friendswood up to the Astrodome area. Cullen Blvd. inside 610 to be exact.

I spent a lot of time riding more suburban/rural roads in order to get used to traffic around me. Hwys. 288/45 aren't too bad. Though I will try to avoid 45 due to construction and overcrowding.

I find surface streets to be the most troubling inside the beltway. People really have a problem paying attention to what they are doing, where they are going. Cellphones, lost, quick lane changes, etc. You really have to keep your head on a swivel. Houston used to be full of courteous drivers. Not so much anymore.

All that being said, I still tend to take surface roads to and from work. Once I am outside the beltway I can choose from several rural routes and have a nice ride. Avoiding the hwy rush hour traffic.
 

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Make sure you tie down your cowboy hat real tight like, and don't go a scrapin' your spurs on the purdy chrome parts.....;)
 

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We use them thar spurs as trainin wheels. Heels down as we lean into a turn. Makes a real purty spark without scratchin up all our shiney parts.
 

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Biggest thing is getting used to your scoot as quickly as possible, said it before and will say it again... Lots of parking lot practice.. Get used to the weight and balance, braking and maneuverability of your bike..

The Rest? .. Just expect cages to pull out in front of you, so be on alert when they can possibly pull out in front of you, take the defensive position in your lane, watch out for blind spots (don't ride in them), watch for car brake and indicator use in traffic, That kind of thing..

After a while, pretty-much all aspects of safe traffic negotiation on a bike becomes second nature, it's less stressful than driving a car.. Because, on a bike, you have better brakes and can usually stop more quickly (with practice), you'll have more maneuverability (with practice) and in an emergency sititation, you can thread that bike through the eye of a needle ( a bike-sized needle - and with practice)..

Practice, relax, ride and keep your wits about you.. Work your way up the ladder when it comes to speed (don't jump into freeway traffic until you are comfortable at around town speeds etc.) .. Take your time, You'll do fine ;)
 

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I'm also a new rider. I trained on bicycles daily for 22 years as well as being a police mountain bike instructor. If I can offer one bit of advise, it's the same advise I offer anyone on a bicycle and taught as one of the most important things you cn watch for as a police mountain biker.

Watch the front wheels of cars at intersections, from parking spaces and even in traffic. They MUST turn their wheels as they do anything. They may not signal, they may not look at or see you, they may change their mind, but they WILL turn the front wheels of the car in the direction they are going to go.

As a triathlete/police cyclist this saved me many times from ending up in the hospital.
 

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Biggest thing is getting used to your scoot as quickly as possible, said it before and will say it again... Lots of parking lot practice.. Get used to the weight and balance, braking and maneuverability of your bike..
;)
I used a version of your advise, I went to the Church parking lot for my practice, still try to go every few weeks. I need all the help I can get!:wink:
 
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