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I have a few questions last saturday night I had a corvette coming the other way hit a spot in the road do a complete loop and end up in my lane coming strait at me. I hit the breaks hard ended up laying the bike down and sliding out of the way past the car on the shoulder. Not sure if that was the rite thing to do but there wasnt much room for anything else as close as he was to me. Other than slide marks and a slightly dimpled up mark on my helmet wich is now trash and being sore Im fine. My bike appears fine other than slide marks on my mirror nob a broken peg that was ground half off first and grind marks on my exaust in a few places. my forks and frame where not touched my tank and side panels also were not touched. But is there anything else I need to watch for that might be messed up but not to visible. Oh also the lay down was thankfully only at 50 MPH
 

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smilts said:
But is there anything else I need to watch for that might be messed up but not to visible. Oh also the lay down was thankfully only at 50 MPH
You might want to take a second look in side your under-drawers, I suspect they could be messed up pretty badly. :lol:

Glad you are ok.
 

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I agree, you are alive. Good thing you were able to separate from the bike. I got hit in December by a car ( SUV) and my separation from the bike is what kept me from a lot more pain and maybe a few Broken bones. I had just taken my third safety course and reacted instinctively because of it. Good to hear you are fine and hope you don’t loose the will to ride.

Cheers

Paul
 

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If a person has enough time to think to lay the bike down, do they not have enough time to do a swerve maneuver?
I am not trying to be a smart ass here, thankfully I have never done a get-off at any speed.
I know when I am alone on the highway I try to practice swerving by zig- zagging back and forth. :?:
 

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For some who have been riding for years and taken repeated advanced safety courses, it becomes instinct. In my course, we had to practice laying a bike down in a circle that was only 15 feet across at 40kph and we had to be at least 4 feet away from the bike to pass. Who know what anybody would do in any situation. In mine, the bike was going down and I just did what I had practiced.
 

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I urge you to bring your bike up to speed, let out a breath, think good thoughts, and progressively squeeze that front brake lever harder than you ever have. But don't just yank it in. Squeeze at a pace but keep on squeezing. Too many people snatch the brake lever in and lock the front wheel then panic. By squeezing a little slower, but as hard as you can, you can slow that bike to a stop far, far quicker than you think you can.

And as mentioned, swerving is a great first-line-of-defense skill to master.
 

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Dragoon said:
For some who have been riding for years and taken repeated advanced safety courses, it becomes instinct. In my course, we had to practice laying a bike down in a circle that was only 15 feet across at 40kph and we had to be at least 4 feet away from the bike to pass. Who know what anybody would do in any situation. In mine, the bike was going down and I just did what I had practiced.
How do they practice laying the bike down ?

is it dirt bikes ?
 

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sdbrit68 said:
Dragoon said:
For some who have been riding for years and taken repeated advanced safety courses, it becomes instinct. In my course, we had to practice laying a bike down in a circle that was only 15 feet across at 40kph and we had to be at least 4 feet away from the bike to pass. Who know what anybody would do in any situation. In mine, the bike was going down and I just did what I had practiced.
How do they practice laying the bike down ?

is it dirt bikes ?
Yeah, no kidding....I've always ALWAYS been taught that you never separate yourself from your bike. I can't see taking a safety class just so I can scratch up some paint.
 

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Yup, they are dirt bikes donated by Yamaha at the time. I guess the vein for doing so was that statistically, the bike once on the ground is a 500lb+ projectile that can do more damage to you then you might realize. I didn’t create the curriculum but it was the Canada safety counsel course and I took it three time in the 80’s, then again in the 90’s and I took another local course last November ( which I admit they did not have you go through this separation. Another thing they do is get you up to 40kph and then at some point unknown to you in advance ( they don’t let you watch the other students) they throw an object in your path that you have no choice but to go over. The Canada safety counsel course is considered world class and represented some of the scariest experiences I ever had on a bike. I am sure I am a better ( not perfect) rider because of it.

What I wonder is when you are sliding down the road at 50mph with a bike laying on your leg ( presumably) what is the percentage in staying close to this now deadly object?
 

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Laying a bike down as far as I know is old school avoidance. It's from back in the days of poor brakes. But if you do lay your bike down I would suspect it would travel at a higher speed than you. Probably alot less friction in metal and plastic than people. So, if you intentionally lay it down or otherwise low slide wouldn't the bike be ahead of you? If my theory holds then on a high side it could catch up to you, that of course wouldn't be good.
 

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If your handlebars took a shot then replace the risers!!!!
I had one break (riser) on a used bike I had bought used and broke my back.
It took 8 weeks before I could ride again.
There was no warning, just BANG, I was on the pavement in the middle of a curve. I've been riding (and racing) along time and can get out of almost any problem.
Its just cheep security.

Be Safe,

Denny
 

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its interesting that other countries take riding safety and learning a lot more important than we do
 

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Dragoon said:
Yup, they are dirt bikes donated by I took it three time in the 80’s, then again in the 90’s and I took another local course last November ( which I admit they did not have you go through this separation.?
I wonder if they changed to to reflect current thought that laying down the bike is not the way to go or for liability issues?
 

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halfcent said:
If a person has enough time to think to lay the bike down, do they not have enough time to do a swerve maneuver?
I am not trying to be a smart ass here, thankfully I have never done a get-off at any speed.
I know when I am alone on the highway I try to practice swerving by zig- zagging back and forth. :?:
Not always the case. He didn't mention that he decided to lay the bike down, just that he did lay the bike down.

I was in a situation where I was already at about a 30 degree lean to the right and a car cut over and in front of me. He was less than 1 bike length in front of me and hit the breaks hard. Swerving to miss him would have involved crossing the full length of his car (well, about 3/4 of it) to the left (change direction of a lean while braking and into traffic), swerve harder to the right (guard rail only about 2.5 - 3 foot away as I was very close to the line and on an overpass with very narrow shoulders) or straighten up and brake. Since he was moving slower than I was when he moved over, I had to brake very hard. Swerving to the left was out because I didnt have the distance to clear his car, right would have put me into the rail, and possibly over if I bounced (the under pass was about 20 ft. down) or attempt to brake hard enough to miss him. I attempted to brake and straighten up at the same time. My rear brake was applied as far as I thought I could without having my rear slide out from behind me and I was progressivly tightening my front brakes down. I locked my front (for only a split second, then I was bouncing) and slid out from under my bike as it low sided. I missed his car, but I went down.

My faults were that I was in a bad posisiton, but I needed to take that off ramp. He never signaled, never saw me, and almost hit me while braking and moving slower than I was already. This happened at 40 mph and I was lucky to replace a helmet, mirror, shock, and a little skin. The only way I was going to miss hitting that car in the rear and keep from being thrown headfirst over the bars was to lay the bike down in my opinion. I am a much more experienced rider now, then I had only been riding for about 3 months. I think I fared better because I did. I dont want to sound like I did it on purpose, it was pure accident but in that situation I beleive that it was better to lay it down instead of attempting to swerve.

I am not saying your sentiment was wrong, I just disagree with it because there may be situations that it doesn't apply to. In general I must agree but without more detail, I cant say whether the original posters situation was one of them.

If you have any suggestions besides slowing down while riding in traffic and dont take turns as agressivly while in traffic (my lessons learned), please feel free to make them. I am always up for learning how to be a safer driver/rider.

Alan

PS. I dont mean any insult by this post, just that we disagree.
 

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If you have any suggestions besides slowing down while riding in traffic and dont take turns as agressivly while in traffic (my lessons learned), please feel free to make them. I am always up for learning how to be a safer driver/rider.
Alan,

We are all trying to better ourselves in both our knowledge and riding skills as that is why we are all here. I also am quite sure that the accident you describe came in millisecond increments.(meaning very little time to assess the danger and the proper evasive manuver)

This all happened early in your learning experience but I wonder how you might change your reactions if presented with the very same set of circumstances now that you have more skills.

Also this very manuver is practiced over and over in MSF training (albiet at slower speeds) but the mechanics are the same. While leaned over and a sudden stop is needed the bike MUST stand up first before the hard brake is applied. This action is what prevents the low side.

Now I am not saying that many of us would not have done the same thing you did but I bet that many of the very skilled riders would have been able to avoid both the accident and the low side.

My goal is to one of the ones standing with their bike upright. This is why I examine scenerios like this and try to learn something....
 
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