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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have read through as many threads as I could find about the charging system. I performed the ElectroSport test and found that the stator has laid down. The regulator/rectifier tests out ok but from my readings, it is best to replace it now. I would prefer to purchase and replace the parts once, rather than saving a few bucks now. I am getting ready to order everything I need and was wondering if anyone had any other recommendations?

The bike is a 94 VT1100C

Stator: ElectroSport Stator P/N ESG080
R/R: Roadstercycle Mosfet P/N FH012AA
Left Crankcase Cover Gasket: Honda P/N 11395-MM8-880
Shifter Seal: Honda P/N 91204-425-003
Starter Cover Gasket: Honda P/N 11365-MM8-P00

I plan on getting the charging indicator from Roadstercycle as well. Am I missing anything? Is there something here that I don't need? Just wanted to make sure before ordering all these parts. Thanks in advance!

Doug
 

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I just put that R/R on my 95 yesterday. I would suggest putting a digital volmeter on so you can monitor it as you ride, I'm getting one off Amazon for $20 or so.
Out of curiosity, how did you diagnose your stator? I went by the Clymer manual and I came to the conclusion that it was alright. I'm still getting a low charge with the new regulator though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I used the Electrosport Fault Finding Diagram. Click that link and follow it to the letter. My stator failed the final test of producing three equal readings of 50V AC or higher. They were three different readings and only one was over 50.

As for the indicator, the one that is packaged with the kit should be sufficient. It tells you what range the voltage is in at all times, just not with a number.
 

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I used the Electrosport Fault Finding Diagram. Click that link and follow it to the letter. My stator failed the final test of producing three equal readings of 50V AC or higher. They were three different readings and only one was over 50.

As for the indicator, the one that is packaged with the kit should be sufficient. It tells you what range the voltage is in at all times, just not with a number.
I see. I read the procedure for testing the stator. Wow! That is some confusing wording! From what I can decipher, you are testing the three yellow wires? Hook one up to the +, one to the -, and then connect your voltmeter to read voltage at 5000 rpm between the remaining yellow wire and what else? Ground? Then repeat for the other two wires?
Sorry to be asking so many questions, I just need to get the same thing fixed on my own bike!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
There are four separate tests that have to be done. The tests to be performed are in the boxes. You then take your findings and follow the arrows accordingly. For the final test, the one that mine failed, you disconnect the stator from the rectifier and you will see three yellow wires. Think of the wires as A B C. Your first reading will be from A-B, the second from B-C, and the third from C-A You need to set your multimeter to VAC and take the readings at about 5000 RPM. You should get equal readings, all over 50V. If not, the stator is shot.
 

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As long as your changing the stator and regulator, you may as well get rid of the reason the problem your stator and regulator went bad...the wiring.
It seems Honda went with the cheapest and thinnest wiring they could get by with (on the VT1100s anyway) the wiring between the regulator and the battery is way to thin (light gauge) and will barely carry enough juice to the battery. And if you add any accessories, you just add to the problem.
Your going to need thicker (10 gauge) wire with you new stator/regulator replacement, especially with the new Mosfet style regulator, which will send alot more power to the battery and the stock wiring will not beable to handle it without running hot and possibly causing even more problems.
I suggest running new 10 gauge wires from the regulator to the battery to make sure your battery charges properly.
And make sure all the wires are soldered together using heat shrink to prevent them from making contact with anything. cut out all those plastic connectors and throw them as far as you can.
And like mentioned already, install some type of voltage meter/gauge to keep an eye on your charging system while you ride, especially if you have any added accessories on the bike.
 

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I fail to see why the wire installed by honda in insufficient to carry the load from the RR. By the chart below it is well within the specified range. 10AWG is overkill by a factor of 5 at least. The battery charging amperage is 1.6 amps we are not carrying a lot of load here. The biggest issue is keeping the connectors clean and corrosion free to eliminate resistance in the circuit. BTW the single biggest cause of RR failure and subsequently Stator failure is a dead battery not the wiring.
Batteries are good for about 46 months at best. Less if mistreated.

AWG / amps for chassis wiring / Maximum amps for power transmission
10 / 55 / 15
11 / 47 / 12
12 / 41 / 9.3
13 / 35/ 7.4
14 / 32 / 5.9
15 / 28 / 4.7
16 / 22 / 3.7
17 / 19 / 2.9
18 / 16 / 2.3
19 / 14 / 1.8
20 / 11 / 1.5
21 / 9 / 1.2
22 / 7 / 0.9
 

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There are four separate tests that have to be done. The tests to be performed are in the boxes. You then take your findings and follow the arrows accordingly. For the final test, the one that mine failed, you disconnect the stator from the rectifier and you will see three yellow wires. Think of the wires as A B C. Your first reading will be from A-B, the second from B-C, and the third from C-A You need to set your multimeter to VAC and take the readings at about 5000 RPM. You should get equal readings, all over 50V. If not, the stator is shot.
I understand exactly. Now why didn't they explain it as clearly as you just did?
Somewhat related, how do you estimate 5000 rpm w/o a tach? Is that kinda close to a shift point?
 

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Agree, my wires didn't melt, the connector did. When the connector is new and clean it is just adequate. Not so after corrosion and moisture sets in.

BTW - Posi-Lock connectors have attached my stator wires for over three years now. They handle the current and resist corrosion. More convenient than solder as they can be opened for testing.
 

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Originally Posted by cl65ame

The biggest issue is keeping the connectors clean and corrosion free to eliminate resistance in the circuit.
Often the corrosion is from owners hosing down their bikes and water getting into the open ends of the p-connectors. Sometimes its from rain water getting through the side covers little by little through out the years, or driving under a waterfall, but when the connectors are corroded on a bike only a few years old, it makes you suspect that the PO might have drenched the bike big time. Even with that though, sealing the ends of the p-connector with silicone would have saved terminals. Have you ever wondered why it is that the p-connector on some old bikes are still in pristine condition, and by extension, no stator-R/R related problem. I bet that didn't happen all by itself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
As long as your changing the stator and regulator, you may as well get rid of the reason the problem your stator and regulator went bad...the wiring.
It seems Honda went with the cheapest and thinnest wiring they could get by with (on the VT1100s anyway) the wiring between the regulator and the battery is way to thin (light gauge) and will barely carry enough juice to the battery. And if you add any accessories, you just add to the problem.
Your going to need thicker (10 gauge) wire with you new stator/regulator replacement, especially with the new Mosfet style regulator, which will send alot more power to the battery and the stock wiring will not beable to handle it without running hot and possibly causing even more problems.
I suggest running new 10 gauge wires from the regulator to the battery to make sure your battery charges properly.
And make sure all the wires are soldered together using heat shrink to prevent them from making contact with anything. cut out all those plastic connectors and throw them as far as you can.
And like mentioned already, install some type of voltage meter/gauge to keep an eye on your charging system while you ride, especially if you have any added accessories on the bike.
I like the idea of rewiring the whole thing and had planned to do so. I trust my wiring skills over the 17 year old connections. The indicator that is offered by Jack should be sufficient for monitoring purposes. Thanks for the reply.

I understand exactly. Now why didn't they explain it as clearly as you just did?
Somewhat related, how do you estimate 5000 rpm w/o a tach? Is that kinda close to a shift point?
Thats kinda one of those things that comes with working on motors. I estimated the RPM range and locked the throttle lock. Once the motor was at a steady RPM, I took the three readings. You could always hook up a tach temporarily. I read somewhere that if you hook up a four cylinder tach you can multiply the reading by two to get a correct reading. You may want to research that a bit more as that is from memory.




For what it's worth, I called the local Honda shop and they said that the starter cover gasket mentioned above is not needed. I haven't verified by looking at the bike so if anyone can confirm or deny this, that would be great. I have all the parts headed this way and would hate to be delayed by waiting for a silly gasket.

Thanks in advance.
Doug
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
For any other 1100 owners out there that may be faced with the same question I had, the starter cover gasket IS NEEDED. Once this job is done, I will be posting a full list of parts and part numbers needed to perform the job. Maybe it will help someone else get back on the road quicker than I have been able to.

Doug
 

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Originally Posted by rieckena

Somewhat related, how do you estimate 5000 rpm w/o a tach? Is that kinda close to a shift point?
You don't have to rev the engine up to 5000 rpm with or without a tach. Besides disturbing the neighbors what's that gonna prove beyond a 20-year-old stator isn't outputting optimal voltage. That's what the specs in the manual are based upon. There are old stators that defy their age though and do just that. You're looking for EQUAL voltage across the pairs of yellow wires being tested. Voltage (AC) should increase with rpm. Beyond that, plain ridiculous.

The stator has three wires each a mile long wrapped in an alternating order around a number of metal spools arranged around the circumference of a circle (diagram below). One end of each wire is connected to the other two wires at a common point within the stator. The other end of the wire is what you see sticking out from the stator housing waving at you. When you connect your voltmeter between A and B, you are testing the health of the stator wiring between Point A and Point B, and so forth. If there is an open (break) in the stator wiring, you won't have any AC voltage. If there is an short (nick) in the stator wiring, voltage in that section of wire will be less than in the other two sections. *When you test the wires, after disconnecting the p-connector, you should be back-probbing the terminals. Otherwise, you may or may not get a false negative due to the wires being frayed at the crimp which can't be easily seen. (Diagram from Internet, not mines.)

 
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