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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all. I am kind of signing off here. I sold my last Shadow, an 05 VT750DC about four years ago.

In 2018 I took my wife's Honda Reflex scooter out for a spin. I was sitting at a traffic light about a mile from home. I was behind 3 stopped cars when I glanced in the mirror and a guy in an F150 was coming up pretty fast, was looking down in his lap and not out the windshield. He was braking but he wasn't going to stop in time. I barely had time to stand up before he smashed into the back of me and drove the scooter into the stopped car in front of me. My scooter became a crush zone. Luckily as I stood up, the impact just jerked the handlebars out of my hands and I ended up on the top box and the hood of the truck. I was a little bruised but nothing serious. Since I an now in my 70's, we don't heal like we used to and there are so many people who aren't paying attention to their driving, we decided that it might be time to hang up the two wheelers. We didn't replace the Reflex and I sold my 05 Silverwing.

Fast forward to this Spring and being mostly stuck at home with this coronavirus. My wife can sit with a book for hours but I need something to do with my hands. I told her that I wanted to find a project. I found a candidate on Craigslist. I called on an 85 Honda Elite 150 but was too late. Then I called on a 77 GL1000. It was sitting for 15 years and the owner said that it had an ignition problem when he parked it. It had 45k miles on it. He had drained the tank before he parked it. It had no battery so we couldn't try the electrics, the clutch handle was broken off and neither front or rear brakes worked. The throttle was stuck. I tried the kick starter and the engine wasn't locked up. It was in really nice shape and I gave him $500 for it.

I got it home and sprayed it down with degreaser, power washed it and then dried it with a leaf blower. I wanted a project but where do you start when you have to check everything? Fast forward to learning where things are actually located on a Wing which was totally new to me. I bought a battery and discovered that the engine would crank and all the lights and the horn worked but there was no spark. I ordered a dynatek ignition module and once it arrived I static timed the engine. I replaced tires, timing belts, all cables, rebuilt both front calipers, rear caliper and replaced the front master cylinder.I have taken anything that is removable off and cleaned, polished or painted it. I am in the process of rebuilding carbs. I am waiting on 4 o-rings and then I can reassemble the carbs. So far I have about $600 in parts.

I have had it running and out for a few rides and it really goes. It has a rough idle and a hesitation off-idle which is why I am now in the process of rebuilding the carb rack. This has turned into a nice daily driver bike. I know that we decided to let the 2 wheelers go but once it is in your blood..... So long to everyone here.
July 4th.jpg
carbs.jpg
 

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Nice GW. Great find.


Sitting on my VTX making Vroom Vroom noises.
 

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1999 Shadow 750 ACE VT750CD3 Modified
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2,695 Posts
Welcome back!
Looks great, that bike really is quite a snapshot in time.
A friend of mine had a near duplicate of it in the early 1980's and that triggers some memories for me.
 

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84 VT500C retro bobber
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1,472 Posts
Beautiful bike! I love the wings when they were super bikes, before they turned into huge highway sofas with attached closets.
 

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2001 Valkyrie I/S
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5,859 Posts
Nice find, welcome to the forum.
 

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That is a really nice looking bike! Congratulations on your great find!
and if you meant that you are leaving, don't. We do not care what you ride,
plus you should know, we really, really, really like pictures!
 

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That's a great story, sounds like a lot of fun.
You're doing a great job with that 'wing', it's looking beautiful !
You know, you may have just saved that baby from a bad fate.......
 

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Discussion Starter #9
That's a great story, sounds like a lot of fun.
You're doing a great job with that 'wing', it's looking beautiful !
You know, you may have just saved that baby from a bad fate.......
Actually, the bike saved me. My wife was happy I found it since coronavirus was forcing us to spend so much more time at home. I was running out of things to do and it was really getting to me. Now I look forward to getting up each morning and going to the garage. The original plan was to get it running and to sell it but it has grown on me and now......

This bike was a lot of firsts for me. It was the biggest displacement 1000 cc. Most horsepower 82. Heaviest. 600 lbs. Fastest, even faster than my CB750. It was the first bike that I didn't have the strength to put on the center stand. As it turns out, both front and rear brakes were dragging. Once I rebuilt the front and rear calipers and the bike rolled easily, I was able to put it on the center stand.

After two months work I got it running and rode it a few times. It was a hard starter and had a rough idle and stumbled off-idle. After sitting for all those years rebuilding the carbs was probably unavoidable. I have tried synchronizing the carbs multiple times but the idle was all over the place. Two idle/air adjustments do nothing so I finally ordered 4 carb rebuild kits. I have rebuilt a lot of carbs on both cars and bikes but this rack intimidated me. These are the only carbs with six jets that I have ever worked on. There are two jets with o-rings that push into bores at the bottom of the float bowl and 4 jets that screw in. Keeping track of all the different jet sizes kept me second guessing myself. "Did I put the #60 in the right location?" I pulled the float bowl off the first carb 3 times. As luck would have it, the rebuild kits had everything to rebuild the carbs. What they didn't have was one thick flat washer/o-ring that seals a fuel passage between the plenum and the carb. After 43 years, those were as hard as a rock and I didn't want to put the carbs back on the bike and discover that one of them leaked. I have those on order.

Rebuilding revealed that three screws on the float bowls were stripped. I have a spool of 24 gage brass wire that we use to hang smaller pictures etc. I inserted a length of that brass wire in the holes of the stripped screws. The wire made the holes small enough and pressed the screws into the remaining threads enough that I could tighten those three screws as tight as the rest of the screws.

I got my wife to help me change the tires. That was an episode that probably won't be repeated. She is happy to stay in her world and leave me to mine.
 

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Actually, the bike saved me. My wife was happy I found it since coronavirus was forcing us to spend so much more time at home. I was running out of things to do and it was really getting to me. Now I look forward to getting up each morning and going to the garage. The original plan was to get it running and to sell it but it has grown on me and now......

This bike was a lot of firsts for me. It was the biggest displacement 1000 cc. Most horsepower 82. Heaviest. 600 lbs. Fastest, even faster than my CB750. It was the first bike that I didn't have the strength to put on the center stand. As it turns out, both front and rear brakes were dragging. Once I rebuilt the front and rear calipers and the bike rolled easily, I was able to put it on the center stand.

After two months work I got it running and rode it a few times. It was a hard starter and had a rough idle and stumbled off-idle. After sitting for all those years rebuilding the carbs was probably unavoidable. I have tried synchronizing the carbs multiple times but the idle was all over the place. Two idle/air adjustments do nothing so I finally ordered 4 carb rebuild kits. I have rebuilt a lot of carbs on both cars and bikes but this rack intimidated me. These are the only carbs with six jets that I have ever worked on. There are two jets with o-rings that push into bores at the bottom of the float bowl and 4 jets that screw in. Keeping track of all the different jet sizes kept me second guessing myself. "Did I put the #60 in the right location?" I pulled the float bowl off the first carb 3 times. As luck would have it, the rebuild kits had everything to rebuild the carbs. What they didn't have was one thick flat washer/o-ring that seals a fuel passage between the plenum and the carb. After 43 years, those were as hard as a rock and I didn't want to put the carbs back on the bike and discover that one of them leaked. I have those on order.

Rebuilding revealed that three screws on the float bowls were stripped. I have a spool of 24 gage brass wire that we use to hang smaller pictures etc. I inserted a length of that brass wire in the holes of the stripped screws. The wire made the holes small enough and pressed the screws into the remaining threads enough that I could tighten those three screws as tight as the rest of the screws.

I got my wife to help me change the tires. That was an episode that probably won't be repeated. She is happy to stay in her world and leave me to mine.
Would hate to see another old timer leave, especially someone who can write up their projects as well as you do. I hope you stick around, but what ever you decide, good luck with the bike, and 'fair winds and following seas.'
 

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why sign off? Not everyone has a shadow here......I think most enjoy others talking about their bikes..esp when they are talking about fixing them up. Reminds me of the 1978 Honda Civic my dad found in 1990 in a farmers barn when we was out on a work call....Bought it for me....so much mouse turd....started with a screw driver....Was a great car for a 16 yr old,lol Love the goldwing
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for the invite to stick around. I got those washers for the fuel passages between the carbs and the plenum from a company called Randaak. Assembled the rack and connected all the linkages. I reinstalled the rack on the bike.

Moment of truth. Turned on the petcock, switched her on and cranked. It cranked for about 10 seconds and then one cylinder sputtered and then a couple and then it started. I built a homemade manometer from plastic tubing with transmission fluid in it. I connected it to the two cylinders on the right (1 and 3) and adjusted the linkage to balance the two of them. I moved the manometer to the left side and balanced those two cylinders (2 and 4) and then moved the manometer to check side to side ( 2 and 4) it idled but not real stable yet. If I revved it up it would hang at about 3000 and then drop really slowly back to idle. I took it for a test drive and something is still not right. At one traffic light it would idle fine and the next light it would stall and wouldn't stay running without jazzing the throttle. It also bogged sometimes under acceleration and at other times it ran just fine. What a dilema.

The fuel tank is under the seat and the carbs are fairly high so it has a mechanical fuel pump. I began to wonder if maybe it is a fuel pump problem. I checked the gas gauge and I was at half a tank. I filled the tank to the brim and started it back up. Hmmmm, It idled pretty well. I checked and there is no rebuild kit for the fuel pump so I ordered a new one. Back to waiting on parts again.

I thought I was headed for home plate when I may just be rounding 2nd base.

Pic of my assembled carb rack
carb rack.jpg


The air filter housing bolts onto the opening on top of the plenum.
 

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@RJDoles stick around! A shadow may have brought you here, but don’t leave over the awesomeness of getting a ‘Wing when it started the power cruiser!
knowledge and skill like yours is what makes a forum like this Great!
 

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1998 VT1100C
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That’s a great looking Goldwing, I love the naked look of those early wings. Almost picked up an ‘82 Goldwing Standard but it was leaking from multiple spots and I’m not in a place where I can take on such a project, so I passed and picked up a ‘98 Shadow Spirit.

I’m a little envious that you have the time and knowledge to dig into that nice little piece of history. I’m sure you’ll get ‘er going smooth.
 

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1995 VT1100C2
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Sounds like you have the carbs right. My weak spot has always been the contacts and the primitive auto advance.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
My new fuel pump arrived and I installed it. Went for a ride. The idle is a little erratic, it is slow coming back to idle and there is a light off-idle throttle hesitation. Probably replacing a 43 year old fuel pump was good insurance but it didn't fix my problem.

While I was waiting for my fuel pump to arrive I tried to set the ignition timing with a timing light. The flywheel throws out lots of oil. It makes it very difficult to see the timing marks on the flywheel while being pelted with oil. After a test drive the problem seemed tao be worse.

I don't know what I was seeing when I set the timing but I went back to static timing the engine using a 12 volt test light. I connect one side of the test light to ground and the other lead from the test lamp connects to the blue wire from the coil for cylinders 3 and 4. I crank the engine around until the timing mark F2 is aligned right in the center of the inspection port. I rotate the ignition pickup plate until the test light just switches on. I move the test light to the yellow wire from the coil for cylinders 1 and 2. I rotate the engine around to align the F1 timing mark is in the center of the inspection port. The timing for this one was right on but if it had not been correct, there is a subplate mounted on the ignition plate to adjust the timing for the second coil.

I started the engine and I now have a stable idle and this test ride was much better.

The bike idles and is driveable as is but there is still a hesitation off idle or even cruising at 50 mph and you start to add in a little throttle. I read an article by Randakk about rebuilding the carbs and I didn't set the float levels as precisely as he suggested. He insists that it is critical. He uses a depth gauge and checks and tweaks all 4 corners of the floats to be exactly 21 mm. I am probably going to have to go back and do that. If the throttle tip-in for all four carbs happened at the same time, this ride would be the cat's whiskers.
 

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Actually, the bike saved me. My wife was happy I found it since coronavirus was forcing us to spend so much more time at home. I was running out of things to do and it was really getting to me. Now I look forward to getting up each morning and going to the garage. The original plan was to get it running and to sell it but it has grown on me and now......

This bike was a lot of firsts for me. It was the biggest displacement 1000 cc. Most horsepower 82. Heaviest. 600 lbs. Fastest, even faster than my CB750. It was the first bike that I didn't have the strength to put on the center stand. As it turns out, both front and rear brakes were dragging. Once I rebuilt the front and rear calipers and the bike rolled easily, I was able to put it on the center stand.

After two months work I got it running and rode it a few times. It was a hard starter and had a rough idle and stumbled off-idle. After sitting for all those years rebuilding the carbs was probably unavoidable. I have tried synchronizing the carbs multiple times but the idle was all over the place. Two idle/air adjustments do nothing so I finally ordered 4 carb rebuild kits. I have rebuilt a lot of carbs on both cars and bikes but this rack intimidated me. These are the only carbs with six jets that I have ever worked on. There are two jets with o-rings that push into bores at the bottom of the float bowl and 4 jets that screw in. Keeping track of all the different jet sizes kept me second guessing myself. "Did I put the #60 in the right location?" I pulled the float bowl off the first carb 3 times. As luck would have it, the rebuild kits had everything to rebuild the carbs. What they didn't have was one thick flat washer/o-ring that seals a fuel passage between the plenum and the carb. After 43 years, those were as hard as a rock and I didn't want to put the carbs back on the bike and discover that one of them leaked. I have those on order.

Rebuilding revealed that three screws on the float bowls were stripped. I have a spool of 24 gage brass wire that we use to hang smaller pictures etc. I inserted a length of that brass wire in the holes of the stripped screws. The wire made the holes small enough and pressed the screws into the remaining threads enough that I could tighten those three screws as tight as the rest of the screws.

I got my wife to help me change the tires. That was an episode that probably won't be repeated. She is happy to stay in her world and leave me to mine.
Check out RANDAKKS CYCLE online. He is an early Goldwing guru.
 

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Great story, good deal on the bike and beautiful work restoring it. Would love one of these one day. Good luck with that fuel system, sounds like you're very much on it.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
After getting the bike back together there is still a carb problem. The engine comes back to idle slowly or sometimes hangs about 3000 rpm. Going from idle to just beginning to roll on throttle there is a stumble which is right when you are trying to slip the clutch to get underway so not a good situation. There is also a surging problem while driving. I wondered if it may be the 43 year old fuel pump so I ordered a replacement from Honda. It is probably good insurance even though it didn't solve my problem. I was kind of stymied.

After reading the Randakk article about how critical the float levels are I pulled the carbs off the bike again and popped the float bowls back off. My vernier caliper can measure inside, outside or depth so I set it to the 21 mm specified and check all 4 carburetor floats on all 4 corners. The floats weren't that far off but I may have had to tweak one side or the other to make that dimension. To sum up, they were not 21 mm on all four corners. After making adjustments, I put the float bowls back on and flipped the rack over.

I noticed that two of the choke plates were not opening completely. A comment in the Randakk article mentioning that at least 12 other people have probably had their hands on the carbs of a bike this old. I looked at how the choke linkages worked and realized that one needed a slightly adjustment. I got out a couple pair of pliers and tweeked the linkage just a little bit and now all four choke plates are held open completely by a spring and when I pull out the choke it loses them completely.

I put the carbs back on the bike and synchronized the carbs yet again. I got a nice idle and the throttle response is pretty good now. I went for a ride and it is a much more docile bike. From idle to tip-in is smooth which means I don't have to rev the engine while slipping the clutch to get under way. This bike can get up and go if you want but at light throttle it is finally pretty smooth. Who knew floats would be that critical.
 

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WOW for a barn find it look new? The chrome is good the engine look clean as all get out. I'm a bit jealous of it to be honest. I have an 85 that was sitting in a gargae for 20+ years and I still had to hand polish everything just to make it look OK. Great to hear that you are getting the bugs out of the system and she ia running for you. Nice to see the older bikes still rolling down the road.
 
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