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Yes you can. Jump it just like you would jump a car, but for safety's sake (the safety of your electronics that is) don't jump it with a running car, a car alternator puts out more power than your bike does. Jumping from a vehicle that isn't running is perfectly safe. Some say the car can be running, some say no, but I wouldn't take any chances with my bike.
 

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I would never jump a dead battery, why you may ask?

The Bikes alternator is not designed to charge a battery from dead. An overload like this is a good way to burn up your Alternator.

The Alternator is designed to top-off and maintain your Battery.

This is the same for Automobiles and Trucks too.

Always charge the battery fully first.
 

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My recommendation: Get a charger, in fact I just bought one yesterday for $20. If you plan on storing it in the future get one for a little more cash ($30), it will shut off when the battery is charged.

I got tired of digging up jumper cables and asking a friend to use his car, plus as some people have told me, its not the best idea to jump from a car.
 

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Beachbiker said:
Can you "jump" a dead battery on a 2005 Aero 750? If so, how?
Beachbiker,

To jumpstart your bike you must

1) locate the battery

2) Once you find the battery, you must locate the terminals. They will be two metal protrusions on the top of your battery and will have the heaviest cables on your bike going to them. Usually one will be BLACK and is usually NEGATIVE and one will usually be RED. The RED one is usually POSITIVE and has a plastic/rubber shield covering it. You must expose the metal parts under this shield.

VERY IMPORTANT: Make absolutely certain that you do not contact any part of the POSITIVE (RED) battery terminal with any metal objects other than the POSITIVE jumper cable while the NEGATIVE (BLACK) terminal is connected. If it necessary to use a wrench on the POSITIVE terminal, for your own safety, remove the BLACK terminal from the battery first.

3) Once you've located and exposed both the POSITIVE and NEGATIVE terminal, you must have a Power Pack (they are just a battery with cables already on it) or another battery and a set of jumper cables to supply current to your bike. This other battery can still be in a vehicle or can be just a battery by itself. Carefully hook the cables from the POSITIVE terminal on the Power Pack or battery to the POSITIVE terminal on the bike battery. Make certain that it isn't contacting anything other than the POSITIVE terminal. If it touches anything other than this terminal an explosion could result. Next, hook the NEGATIVE terminals in the same manner.

4) It will help if you just leave the cables connected for a few minutes, this will charge your bikes battery. With the cables still connected, start your bike in the normal way.

5) After the bike starts, remove the cables, disconnecting the NEGATIVE first from one battery then the other. Make sure that is does not contact the POSITIVE cable, if it does, an explosion could result. Next disconnect the POSITIVE cable.


I would strongly recommend safety glasses when working around batteries. If you smell any odors that aren't normal, such as gasoline, rotten eggs (battery acid fumes), paint thinners, starting fluid, ect., DO NOT attempt to jumpstart. Connecting and disconnecting jumper cables produces a very hot spark and can cause these vapors to explode.
 
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