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i saw a video on youtube of a guy, after he had taken carb cleaner to the innards and jets, putting the carbs into a pot of boiling water. it looked like it cleaned it, but my thinking was "a carb and water..rust?". has anyone ever heard of this or done it? are there any downsides to doing it?


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john

1987 honda shadow vt 700
 

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Heard about cleaning carbs that way. Carbs are usually made from aluminum so rust is nothing to be worried about. After you remove the carb from the water just let it air dry for a few days.
 

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My carbs were completely gunked up, I just did the chem dip for 30 mins (no more than that for aluminum from what I hear) and then I fresh water rinsed them and then blew air into all cavities. Last step I did was sprayed them all over with a carb cleaner and dried them up really well, made sure no water was present. I live in vegas so they air dried very fast. Then I put them back together with a rebuild kit. Carbs were as good as new when finished. You can search my posts / threads for my carb pics of the rebuild. turned out great.
 

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I have read about guys that clean old model airplane engines using a crock pot full of antifreeze. Soak 'em overnight on low heat and all the gunk and hard varnish rinses right off. Not good for rubber parts, and definitely not good for cooking dinner afterward, so find one at a garage sale.
 

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Well, any carb I've ever seen is made out of aluminum, so rust is not an issue.but ...
..... Carbs are usually made from aluminum so rust is nothing to be worried about. .....
Alloy corrodes heavenly under influence of water. Rust is corrosion so don't be fouled by aluminium don't rust. Its not brown but white rust.

Water is whats causing all the carb issues with those ethanol blended fuels these days. Enthanol is hygroscopic, it attracts water which causes corrosion even in the deep insides of the carb.

This is how it looks like, carburettor from my '74 Capri V6


Better to dip the "fully stripped" carburettor in a bath of paint thinner for 24 hours.
 

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I am a great believer in chemical cleaning, in the 60's I used to use cellulose thinners to clean my carbs. it used to make them look brand new but I think they changed the formula so it doesn't seem so magic anymore..

There is a chemical for cleaning anything if only you know what it is.

John.
 

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I had heard of boiling in lemon juice, or a water/lemon juice mixture. Supposed to work pretty well, but I haven't tried it.
 

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Alloy corrodes heavenly under influence of water. Rust is corrosion so don't be fouled by aluminium don't rust. Its not brown but white rust.

Water is whats causing all the carb issues with those ethanol blended fuels these days. Enthanol is hygroscopic, it attracts water which causes corrosion even in the deep insides of the carb.

This is how it looks like, carburettor from my '74 Capri V6


Better to dip the "fully stripped" carburettor in a bath of paint thinner for 24 hours.
Correct that alloy does corroded, however that picture looks like the corrosion is due to dissimilar metal contact then from water issues. Just my two cents.
 

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ethanol blended fuel only hurts these carbs when they sit for periods of time. if you run the bikes a lot you're fine. if you plan on setting the bike up for a period of time simply drain the bowls.
 

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Simply soaking your carb. in boiling water, or carb. cleaner like Berryman B12, remove 'all' those little rubber and plastic parts, and after soaking use compressed air to clean out 'all' the 'little' channels and passage ways, that's where blockage and accumulated krud will be. I deal with the ethanol demons on a daily basis and when it dries it turns into a cream colored concrete like substance and it just doesn't go away with just soaking alone. Just a thought.
 

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Alloy corrodes heavenly under influence of water. Rust is corrosion so don't be fouled by aluminium don't rust. Its not brown but white rust.

Water is whats causing all the carb issues with those ethanol blended fuels these days. Enthanol is hygroscopic, it attracts water which causes corrosion even in the deep insides of the carb.

This is how it looks like, carburettor from my '74 Capri V6


Better to dip the "fully stripped" carburettor in a bath of paint thinner for 24 hours.
Aluminum will not rust, it will oxidize fairly quickly and it leaves a thin protective coating of AI203 that prevents further oxidation to the aluminum beneath that coating.
 
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