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Would like your opinions on breaking in a new Phantom. I'm on mile 39 thus far and drive it nice and easy. Minimal engine breaking as I come to a stop sign or light, ease on the brakes, taking corners easy with the new tires.

After how many miles can you drive at highway speeds/constant RPMs?

Thanks for any help!
 

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There are many opionions about this. I just finished the break-in period at 300 miles. Follow the suggestions in the owner's manual. Do not make full-throttle starts or a full-throttle acceleration.
My opinion:
You can ride it on the highway but try to vary the speed a little.
The first time I rode it for ten miles to heat up the engine, then put it away for the day to cool off. The second time 20 miles. The third time 30 miles, etc. After I had 200 miles on it I took a 100 mile trip.
 

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For me its been pretty much the same as everyone else has posted. I admit to not laying off the engine braking as much as I probably should but I've driven manuals of one sort or another my entire life so its hard to suspend that practice!Mine is about to roll 300 miles.
 

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DK's link makes a lot of sense to me, however it's likely I'll never own a new vehicle in my life, so it doesn't apply.
 

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I might baby it just a smidge on a new ride, but after 100 miles it's going to be ridden mostly the way I ride, I'm no hot rodder but like to let the engine move a little, as mentioned out on a freeway/interstate or good two lane road I will run the engine anywhere between 50/80 mph for short periods and then throttle back for awhile then repeat, this will be done all through the break in period, have never had any problems, I call it keeping the carbs clean..........
 

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39miles, your passed the most important part of ring seating, they either seated good , or glazed over the hone job. I'd just ride it now.
 

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Don't want to start a war, but take a look at this and make your own decisions.

Break In Secrets--How To Break In New Motorcycle and Car Engines For More Power

DK
Interesting. I used to work at the Volkswagon assembly plant here in SW Pa. On the engine startup line, what they did did was fire the engine, give it a few quick revs and then hold it wide open for approx. 15 minutes. The motors were in a jig setup before going in the car. The mechanic in that area told me that VW's philosophy was that if a motor was defective, this is where it would show. This also helped with seating rings, he said. This was back in the late 70's.
 

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OK, this has been my procedure for breaking in motors whether they have been my street cars, bikes, or race cars...
I have been doing this for not only my own engines but all the motors that I have built for customers over the last 30-40 years.

Once you have started the engine and got it to a stable operating temperature (with it being driven) and this is to be done within the first 20 miles of a new engine starting, take the bike/vehicle onto a road that you can legally get to about 60mph (or for some of you, down any side street...
LOL... Just j/k).

Ride/drive along at about 35 mph in top gear and then just open the throttle to full and accelerate up to 60mph (no need to go any faster) and then close the throttle to allow the motor to slow you back down to 35mph. Then ride along for about a mile at approx 40mph in top to stabilize the operating temperature. Then repeat this procedure about 5 to 7 times and that’s about 90% taken care of bedding your rings.

After doing this procedure, just ride the bike normally as you would everyday but not pu$$y footing it, but also don’t rev it high either for about the first 800-1200 miles... Never ever ride for periods at any constant speed especially highway speed during the first 1000miles as this can glaze your bores and will greatly reduce your ring sealing. If you have to ride freeway/highways, keep varying you speed and try and allow the motor to slow you down.

Now I’ll briefly explain why I do it this way. When you open the throttle wide open at 35mph it will load the rings hard up against the cylinder walls bedding the rings to the cylinder walls and as this will only be a few seconds before you reach 60mph there isn’t a high heat build up on either the piston rings or bore.

And then by closing the throttle at 60mph you will create a negative pressure in the combustion chamber which will help pull the oil up onto the cylinder walls and rings, and it will perform several functions, lubricate, clean and cool. Now before you start to say what about the bottom end etc, remember a couple of things, by doing this in top gear you don’t actually rev the engine and also its for a very short time to cause any problems on any lower end components plus the tolerance these days is held a lot closer than it used to be 10, 20 or more years ago, and therefore is not usually a problem with modern day engines (or newly built older one that has been clearanced correctly).

As bedding the rings is probably the most critical part of the run in procedure, because if you glaze the bores, well there's only one way to fix that and that's to hone them again. Think about it, bearings, rod side clearance etc all have clearances but the rings are pressured against the bore and need to have been seated correctly to a none glazed wall finish.

As I said this is how I’ve always done it and just did this same break in procedure to my 2010 Honda Shadow Spirit VT750C2.
Now I’m not into any debate about this procedure, I do it this way, not telling you too, but in 40 years I have never had any problems by bedding in any engine this way and will continue this way with any new engine I have...
 

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Never had a problem driving like you always do. When replacing a camshaft in a flat top tappet motor the instructions tell you not to let it idle. Keep the speed around 2500 for the first few min to break in tappets and lobes. How many buy a new car and only drive 10 miles the first day, 20 the second? Doubt it, Mom hops in and drives the kids around like normal and the car is very likely to do well over 100,000 miles with no problems.
 

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Ride it like you stole it . And that 600 mile valve check dont waste your money . ( told by the dealer I deasl with ) wait itll around 8000 . I just did mine myself a 9500 and it is fine .
 

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I only have 4,000 KM .... 2,500 miles.... on mine so I still consider that I am still breaking it in.
I definitely do not agree with oil change times except the first one and on that one converted to part synthetic oil.
Had second oil change when I stored it last fall.
One thing with driving back roads I am always varying the speed.... down shifting etc. when going through all the towns then back up to high way speed. Have yet to maintain one speed for any major length of time.
 
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