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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

I have a couple follow up to my initial chain adjustment question from yesterday.

After watching a few YouTube videos and reading the forum here, I am all set to adjust my chain today. Just a few follow up questions before I get it done.

1- Looking at the arrows on my bolt I noticed the arrows don't match on the left and right side bolts. I understand that the bolts on both sides have to turn the same amount when adjusting, but with the arrows not matching at the moment, do I still go equal on both sides or I should first make one match the other and then turn them bith equally? Images attached.

2- manual doesn't say if I have to turn the bolt clock or counter when tightening. The video I watched on YouTube for shadow says counter to tighten but then I read clockwise different places online. Is this something universal or it depends on how the chain was initially set up?
 

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1. This is how I do it. I spin the adjust bolts ccw so the horseshoe [call it] is as close to the swingarm as it can go on both sides. That says the axle is closer to the front wheel. I want a semi loose axle nut so the wheel floats and is not putting pressure on the bolt threads in other words, having the axle bolt a little loose.

Then I use a bright color nail polish, paint one flat on the adjust bolt. I now count turns equally, and run my hand under the rung of the chain, push it up and feel how many more equal turns I need. We are down to each flat is now a huge movement that takes up the slack fast, once you take the initial slack out, bringing the horseshoe adjusters towards you.

If done right, you have the painted flat equal in clock stops, meaning if one is at 2 o'clock, so should the other one. Now you look at the vertical lines at the side of the swingarm. So, when you look at the horizontal indents on the top of the horseshoe, they should line up with the vertical cast bumps of the swingarm adjust lineup-lines of both swing and horseshoe lineup marks.

2. Because the axle bolt is loose, I now step on the lower rung of the chain. This pulls on the adjusters via chain, sends both up to the stops of any slack at the adjust parts. Now I tighten the axle nut with the foot tension on the lower rung. But I more snug it up than fully tighten it.

I have to remove my foot off the chain, now check my up and down movement. If it dials in, then it's axle [tighten] first, second, it's an ever so slight on the adjust bolts, where I snug those up against the swingarm. The clock wise is to stand to the rear of the bike, look at the adjust bolts, now you know, turning right or cw, is tight. Turning left, or ccw, is now the slogan to remember, 'right tee tight tee, lefty loose see.... can you see it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
1. This is how I do it. I spin the adjust bolts ccw so the horseshoe [call it] is as close to the swingarm as it can go on both sides. That says the axle is closer to the front wheel. I want a semi loose axle nut so the wheel floats and is not putting pressure on the bolt threads in other words, having the axle bolt a little loose.

Then I use a bright color nail polish, paint one flat on the adjust bolt. I now count turns equally, and run my hand under the rung of the chain, push it up and feel how many more equal turns I need. We are down to each flat is now a huge movement that takes up the slack fast, once you take the initial slack out, bringing the horseshoe adjusters towards you.

If done right, you have the painted flat equal in clock stops, meaning if one is at 2 o'clock, so should the other one. Now you look at the vertical lines at the side of the swingarm. So, when you look at the horizontal indents on the top of the horseshoe, they should line up with the vertical cast bumps of the swingarm adjust lineup-lines of both swing and horseshoe lineup marks.

2. Because the axle bolt is loose, I now step on the lower rung of the chain. This pulls on the adjusters via chain, sends both up to the stops of any slack at the adjust parts. Now I tighten the axle nut with the foot tension on the lower rung. But I more snug it up than fully tighten it.

I have to remove my foot off the chain, now check my up and down movement. If it dials in, then it's axle [tighten] first, second, it's an ever so slight on the adjust bolts, where I snug those up against the swingarm. The clock wise is to stand to the rear of the bike, look at the adjust bolts, now you know, turning right or cw, is tight. Turning left, or ccw, is now the slogan to remember, 'right tee tight tee, lefty loose see.... can you see it?
Thank you @Bentone ! Appreciate the detailed reply and tips.
 

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Just don't get it too tight, makes for fast chain wear. Some also say the factory alignment marks can be off and you should use a chain alignment tool. MotionPro has an inexpensive one that clamps to your sprocket and a guide rod that lays alongside your chain. fairly easy to tell if the chain is parallel to the sprocket.

 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Just don't get it too tight, makes for fast chain wear. Some also say the factory alignment marks can be off and you should use a chain alignment tool. MotionPro has an inexpensive one that clamps to your sprocket and a guide rod that lays alongside your chain. fairly easy to tell if the chain is parallel to the sprocket.

Thank you!
 
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