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Discussion Starter #1
The bike turns 11 years since I bought her and she is just around the corner from 45,000 miles. Clutch has started to slip badly in 1st and 2nd so new EBC clutches go in next week to go with the EBC installed a year or two ago. Any tips, tricks or advice for removal or installation?
 

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1983 Honda vt750 Shadow
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My bike is a bit different but I remember many guys talking about the torque on the bolts for the springs only about 9 pounds. And some have broken one off being too strong with them.
 

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get a paper gasket for the crankcase - it just makes **** easier and cleaner
get new crush gaskets for the exhaust

get some 000 steel wool and clean up the backsides of pipes and belly of the crankcase, and while u at it remove the plastic cylinder jugs and use some chrome polish to make every inch look new, while its broken down
 

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Discussion Starter #5
If you can, let the friction plates soak in oil overnight.
Thanks Sidejam. I plan to soak them in the oil I drain out and reuse that for a couple hundred miles before changing the oil and filter.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
My bike is a bit different but I remember many guys talking about the torque on the bolts for the springs only about 9 pounds. And some have broken one off being too strong with them.
When I put the EBC springs in I used the torque wrench.
 

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Good choice on clutch by the way. I replaced my clutch with an EBC clutch and heavy duty springs. So far, very happy with it.
 

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Pro-Tip: Don't over-tighten the bolts that hold the clutch case to the block! You'll have a bad time!


But it all honesty be careful, and use an even stream of gasket maker when you are putting it back on. I did overtighten one of the bolts and had to have the engine case drilled and tapped!


Also don't over-tighten the bolts that hold the clutch springs down, I had to replace the back plate because of it, and that was a bad time too.


In summary, use a high quality torque wrench and it will save a few headaches!
 

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I bought the Barnett clutch kit that comes in today for my 11 phantom. Is the clutch plate holder tool really necessary to change out the plates? I thought there was another tool recommended too. I have a torque wrench and plan on using that.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Everything went well with removal. Not having spoke wheel I used a tie down strap between the mag spokes and the swing arm to keep the rear wheel from turning thus stopping the tranny from turning. Un staking the nut was tedious but not too bad.

Things went to sh#%*'@t putting the side case back on and installing the clutch cable. Didn't seem like there was enough tension on the clutch spring so, I took the side case back off and figured I needed to give the clutch rod another turn. Doing so snapped the retaining clip off the end of the spring. Waiting on a new spring to try it again since the manual is not very clear on how much tension there should be or if you need to "wind" the spring. The clutch cable was in the middle of the adjustment range so I sure it is not stretched.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I bought the Barnett clutch kit that comes in today for my 11 phantom. Is the clutch plate holder tool really necessary to change out the plates? I thought there was another tool recommended too. I have a torque wrench and plan on using that.
Not sure how the Phantom disassembles but some folks have someone sit on the bike and lock the rear wheel brake to stop the tire from turning and loosen the clutch nut. Others made a "tool" out metal plate or wood by drilling a hole large enough for the socket to fit and four holes to bolt the tool to the spring mounting post.
 
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