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http://www.keveney.com/Engines.html

Shamelessly plagiarized from another forum. If a four-stoke engine has a power stroke every second time the piston hits TDC, and a two-stroke has a power stroke every TDC, what do you call a locomotive steam engine that has a power stroke at both ends of the piston movement?
 

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MikeB said:
http://www.keveney.com/Engines.html

Shamelessly plagiarized from another forum. If a four-stoke engine has a power stroke every second time the piston hits TDC, and a two-stroke has a power stroke every TDC, what do you call a locomotive steam engine that has a power stroke at both ends of the piston movement?
That's easy... a half stroke. :wink:

I want to see someone build a custom chopper with a gnome engine. Now that would be interesting... from a distance. :lol:
 

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MikeB said:
http://www.keveney.com/Engines.html

Shamelessly plagiarized from another forum. If a four-stoke engine has a power stroke every second time the piston hits TDC, and a two-stroke has a power stroke every TDC, what do you call a locomotive steam engine that has a power stroke at both ends of the piston movement?
They were simply called, you guessed it, "single stroke steam engines".

Cool site too. Helps people who don't really understand how engines
work to see a visual of what is going on.
 

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MikeB said:
http://www.keveney.com/Engines.html

Shamelessly plagiarized from another forum. If a four-stoke engine has a power stroke every second time the piston hits TDC, and a two-stroke has a power stroke every TDC, what do you call a locomotive steam engine that has a power stroke at both ends of the piston movement?
MikeB,

This isn't an official definition, but I'm thinkng that steam engines are very similar to hydraulic cylinders. Using that as a guide, a hydraulic cylinder that is pressured in one direction only is called a 'single action' cylinder. One that operates with pressure in both directions is called a 'double action' cylinder. Also, this same terminology applies to air operated cylinders as well. Air and steam share many characteristics in this circumstance.

I don't see a reason why it couldn't also be applied to steam cylinders, but maybe some old railroad buff may be able to provide something more authoritive.


John
 

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Olivereaman gets the Prize

Olivereaman
You are correct Double Acting is the correct name for steam locomotive
cylinders. They used to make marine diesel engines too. They were very big with over a 1000 HP per cylinder.
TRed2
 
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