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Anyone remember what you paid to replace your front tire on a Shadow ? Labor only I may Amazon order it depending on local prices. Thanks.
 

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Depends if you take the wheel off the bike or they take it off, most places will give you a break on labor if you buy the tire from them. About $20 wheel off, not sure wheel on.
I buy my tires from the dealer and take wheels off = no charge. Tires are about $20.00 higher than getting them on line so it's a wash and it keeps the dealer in business.
 

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About $80.00 worth of tools and I do it myself. Shop prices are going to vary by location. The best thing to do is call around and talk to the ones in your area.
 

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I paid $125 for tire & wheel bearing (labor, supplied my own bearing) and the tire was about $50 over online pricing. Without tools & space to do it myself, well worth the extra $$$.
 

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If you have a number of shops in your area by all means shop around. There can be large differences in labor costs between the factory dealerships and the local non-factory guys.
 

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NA = Not Applicable :D

I do my own work...
I do work on a donation, I`ve received everything from a Thank You and I`ve received $100 for two tires...
I`m Not in business, I`m just helping those in need :D:D

LLLL Bring it over
 

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Having slightly more money than sense, I have always had my tires changed in sets and by taking my scoot into a local shop - $225 labor for both..

Aaaaaand That's the reason I'm currently shopping for my own tire changing gear.. :lol:

As mentioned, It is much cheaper to just take in the wheel.. But.. I figure, that if I can take off the wheel, I can change a tire..

Cost for a wheel balancer and tire change platform/bead breaker, spoons, and etc.. About $150-$200.00.. So that will more than pay for itself on the first tire change.

Been wanting to work on my own bikes more, and with the planned addition of an adventure bike, which will be sporting 50/50 tires as it will be spending as much time off road as on, I figure that I'll be going through a lot of tires..

Plus.. For me.. It's going to be more a convenience in doing these things myself.. Beats making an appointment, taking my bike into the shop - getting a ride home - waiting around for a phone call - going back down to the shop - getting robbed to pick my bike up..

When I can leisurely change a tire in an hour or so.

If you gotsta get somebody else to do the job.. Call around.. They may only be able to give you an approximate price for off the bike costs, but those costs will give you an idea of how reasonable they are likely to be if you take your bike in - tires attached. ;)
 

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Ya know, I wonder?

IF I take my bike to a shop for a front tire change; Are they taking a good look at all the things that I do??
I check for bearing wear, brake pad condition, check tire wear, (for apparent problems) Steering components, fork seals, brake fluid level, brake lines etc...

Just curious?
 

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^^ There's That too! ... ;) ..Mornin' Dennis!
 

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Yeah the shops get Big $ for their labor, but do they apply their knowledge and training when the "have to" wrestle with tires???
OR do they allow lesser paid personnel handle these??
>>>
Good Morning Mark & HSN, the sun is shining here today!! Hurray!!! :D:D
Prayer lifted to those in that Blizzard and bad weather...
 

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I use a guy called Cycle Steve here in Evansville, In. Great guy and I wouldn't trust anyone else. He will do it for $20 with wheel off the bike or $50 with wheel on the bike. If you buy the tires from him (his tires are almost same as online prices) he will do it for free. On or off the bike. Call around and ask them. If they want your business (this time of year they are slow) they will negotiate with you.

Mornin Mike.
 

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Prices around here make no sense. Best I found withing reasonabe distance was $75/wheel so I started changing my own.

Aaaaaand That's the reason I'm currently shopping for my own tire changing gear.. :lol:

As mentioned, It is much cheaper to just take in the wheel.. But.. I figure, that if I can take off the wheel, I can change a tire..

Cost for a wheel balancer and tire change platform/bead breaker, spoons, and etc.. About $150-$200.00.. So that will more than pay for itself on the first tire change.
Having spent the money and done the work multiple times, I can tell you that "investing" a couple of hundred bucks in the gear is NOT worthwhile unless you're riding a thousands of miles each month or changing tires for friends. Better to build what you need from scrap lumber -- even if you have to build it anew for each tire change.

The tough parts of the change? First comes breaking the bead. I built a bead breaker from scrap lumber. If I were doing it again, I'd just make a "T" from two pieces then mount it onto a stud in a wall of the garage. Maybe even just mount a block to the stud to "catch" the far end. (The downward leg of the T breaks the bead.)

Tire irons (aka spoons)? I'd go with zip ties per this video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U9MpgD-xIjg
Gonna try that next time I change a tire. Should even make safely getting the tube installed easier.

Balancing? I'm using Dynabeads but if I weren't I'd just get a couple of saw horses and a piece of chalk. Use the axle to hang the tire between the saw horses, put on some clamps to keep the axle from "walking" then spin the tire. Use the chalk to mark the top (or bottom if you prefer) and repeat multiple times. The marks will tell you where to add weight -- the lightest part of the tire will stop at the top. Use masking tape to hold the weight(s) in place until you've got the marks coming out unpredictably.
 

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Having spent the money and done the work multiple times, I can tell you that "investing" a couple of hundred bucks in the gear is NOT worthwhile unless you're riding a thousands of miles each month....
Yup! :D ..And year-round too..

I'm investing more than minimum in equipment ... Though, Got to admire your ingenuity ;)

..I go through tires pretty quick, as I ride Highway and interstate speeds over some bad roads, so my tires are squared-off, cupped and shredded in short order..

I can afford to get somebody to do this for me.. Feels like an awful waste of money though, and I would just rather prefer to do these things myself..

No reason why I can't. so.. :) Y'know.. :)

Mornin Dennis and Mark.
Mornin' Michael! Mornin' Everyone!
 

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I got mine done for 25 bucks at a local shop, I took the wheel off of the bike and bought my own tube, tire, and rim strip. Mounted and balanced! I called my local stealership and if I brought them the whole bike and front and rear tires it was gonna be $180 for just the front ($220 for the rear) if I bought the tires from them they would knock $60 off of the total. (About $650 for the front and back from the Honda place :/)
 

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I can afford to get somebody to do this for me.. Feels like an awful waste of money though, and I would just rather prefer to do these things myself..
Yup. But unless you're going for pneumatic or hydraulic equipment the effort required to change tires isn't any different with purchased equipment than with homebuilt -- and probably a lot more than actually required. That's BEFORE getting into the issues with storing the stuff. I've got a tire changer with motorcycle tire adapter, tire irons, Mojolever, Nomar Xtrahand and Yellow Thing and, honestly, all the money spent is wasted if zip ties work as well as shown in the video.

Back in the day, I changed hundreds of car tires with a J.C. Whitney bead breaker and a pair of tire irons. Didn't even have a compressor. The idea that I've now got the money to make it easier on myself just did not fly. I change my bike tires more as a matter of convenience than money -- though I have a hard time paying $75/wheel after jumping through all the hoops to get the wheels into the hands of a second-rate mechanic who is learning on the job. (First-rate mechanics don't change tires if they can pass that grunt work onto a grunt.)
 
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