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Has anyone had a blowout? If so, did you stop in a controlled manner, or did you stop,drop and roll?
 

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Has anyone had a blowout? If so, did you stop in a controlled manner, or did you stop,drop and roll?
Never had a blow out but did have a engine lock up, in any emergency situation what will happen will largely be dependent on whether the rider remains calm or panics, the answer to your question is yes, some will stop in a controlled manner, some will fall down, go boom or worse.
 

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sometimes it's a wipeout. sometimes not.
 

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:shock: Well first...if you have decent tires it is not likely you'll ever have a blowout. The engineering on today's tires are far superior to that of 40/50 years ago. I had a blowout once in, I believe 67 or 68. Old tire that had no tread and less than that. Back tire just blew out while doing 65mph on a very hot day. If I remember...I clamped my legs to the tank, let off the throttle and simply let the bike ride it out while slowly easing to the shoulder. It made a lot of noise, a lot of wriggling and tore the sh*t out of the back fender. Tire literally fell apart. But, as I mentioned before, you'll probably never have to worry about it. Buy quality tires. Check the production date of the tire (some lay in warehouses for years and "dry out"). And don't run your tire past the tread. I probably, and currently am, running my tires down further than I should. I replace mine while there is still a "felt" amount of tread in the center. But I also ride 8 miles of gravel crappy roads a day just to get to the highway to commute to work. :-D
 

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sometimes it's a wipeout. sometimes not.
Sometimes you need new shorts, Sometime you don't even notice.

Check your tires, before each ride. There is not excuse for having a blowout on a bike. If a tire even looks iffy, DON'T ride, ORDER a tire.

Picking up some debris and getting a flat, is a different matter. Hopefully you never have one go down, in a high speed turn. Not fun if your wearing shorts and a T-Shirt.
Basically same as a car, slow down, DO NOT use brakes or downshift to slow down. Carefully aim at the side of the road, NO abrupt turns. Stay as straight a possible, while angling to the side. When you do get stopped, don't forget the kickstand. Don't be embarrassed by the shaking hands or dirty shorts.
 

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Sometimes you need new shorts, Sometime you don't even notice.

Check your tires, before each ride. There is not excuse for having a blowout on a bike. If a tire even looks iffy, DON'T ride, ORDER a tire.

Picking up some debris and getting a flat, is a different matter. Hopefully you never have one go down, in a high speed turn. Not fun if your wearing shorts and a T-Shirt.
Basically same as a car, slow down, DO NOT use brakes or downshift to slow down. Carefully aim at the side of the road, NO abrupt turns. Stay as straight a possible, while angling to the side. When you do get stopped, don't forget the kickstand. Don't be embarrassed by the shaking hands or dirty shorts.
Indeed you just nailed it DO NOT be embarrassed, and never trust anyone who says they just shrugged the whole thing off when it happened to them, calm does not mean fearless, it means working through fear with level thinking and composure.
 

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I had a front go at freeway speeds a long time ago in San Diego. Would not call it a blowout as it was more a slow release of air within seconds. The freeways are already squirrely out there because of the rain grooves so at first I thought it was some especially nasty "groovin" but the front got very mushy in a hurry and I was able to get it off the freeway at the bikes natural slowing speed..no brakes no drastic steering. Front flat..dirty shorts.........

Needed a tow........ never bought a bike with spokes again. Tubeless can be patched and/or filled with a can if its not a sidewall issue which would be very rare. Which at least will get you somewhere else

Usually its a nail that gets thrown and air pressure is released quickly. Screws usually go unnoticed unless you check air pressure everyday. TPMS would be great on a bike.
 

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I had a front go at freeway speeds a long time ago in San Diego. Would not call it a blowout as it was more a slow release of air within seconds. The freeways are already squirrely out there because of the rain grooves so at first I thought it was some especially nasty "groovin" but the front got very mushy in a hurry and I was able to get it off the freeway at the bikes natural slowing speed..no brakes no drastic steering. Front flat..dirty shorts.........

Needed a tow........ never bought a bike with spokes again. Tubeless can be patched and/or filled with a can if its not a sidewall issue which would be very rare. Which at least will get you somewhere else

Usually its a nail that gets thrown and air pressure is released quickly. Screws usually go unnoticed unless you check air pressure everyday. TPMS would be great on a bike.
I am also a member of the NO SPOKES ALLOWED club
 

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TPMS is great! I have it on my Concours, my Canyon and my wife's Charger...nice feature. On the Concours, it's one of the optional screens you can choose to display as you ride and usually where I keep mine set. I pretty well know how far I've been, estimated mpg @ current conditions or estimated fuel range for remaining fuel.
 

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Blew a rear on my '75 Norton Commando. Just eased over to the side of the freeway. Got a little goosey but no real problem other than pushing the bike a few blocks. My wife, then girlfriend, did nor like it AT ALL! She has never ridden since.
 

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This spring I was riding up to Springfield, MO on 65, they are redoing the flyovers and as I crossed the bridge and merged to the NEW Flyover, my bike began to feel funny, the back was loose and I thought to myself~mmm, this is funny and this is a new road, then it hit me that I was pretty sure I had a flat. The tires on the bike would have made it one more season. I wasn't going more than 35 as I merged on to the flyover, thank goodness, and I just got up over the top when I pulled into the shoulder. YUP~rear tire FLAT!! We called a friend to come pick up my bike and ordered a new rear and had it put on. Just kept calm, cool and had no major issues.
 

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Oh my... then every third g-d post on here would be about the TPMS... I used to frequent a car forum that was like that
LOL True..But I will be the first to admit I don;t check the air pressure in my tires everyday, TPMS served to allow me to repair/replace car tires before the "time out" on the side of the road. On a bike it would be and very useful.

looked into the external ones for my bike but the screens are too big...
 

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I had a rear (tube tire) go flat on the KLR once -got a little squirrelly but nothing to exciting - it did go down fairly quickly but not a blow out.

A guy I used to work with had the guts (all metal parts) of a valve stem leave the valve doing about 70mph while crossing the American Legion Bridge on a busy weekend - anyone from the DC area knows what that means - oh and it was the front tire - so deflation was quite fast - managed to hold the BMW RS up and get it to the shoulder......with some effort - I am pretty sure he neede a new set of Aerostitch drawers after he got stopped.

I think if you don't panic and try to brake or steer to quickly you can ride it out in a lot of cases.
 

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I've posted this here before. I had a flat on an old Bridgestone Spitfire when I first got my 1100. I was following a buddy through orlando on I-4 on a Sunday morning. We were tooling along eastbound right at about 90 mph and coming up on the Semoran Blvd exit. I felt the back end wiggle and knew I had a serious problem. It wasn't a blowout but a fast flat. Long story short, I got the bike to the median side of the 5 lane hwy. without going down and spent 30 minutes sitting on the guardrail getting my wits back about me and spooning the crap outta my shorts.

What happened was that the old tire gave way through a crack in the sidewall. My own f*cking stupidity in trying to push the life of a crappy old tire. To this day, I'm still haunted by that event. Am I glad it happened? Yes and no. Yes because I now have the confidence that I can handle alot where my bike is concerned. No because I am haunted by that event every single damned time that I run over a crack in the pavement or something makes the back end of the bike wiggle just a little bit.
 

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My flat tire related stories;
Luckily the only flat tires I`ve had were while STOPped, I noticed it when I started off...
I keep an eye on pressure MOST of time BEFORE I leave home...
Last one was While I was away from home, I had picked up a screw and felt it getting low before I had stopped and parked fer the day, it leaked down the rest of the way...I felt it as soon as I started moving...
Time before that was shortly after my TCLOCS and I was leaving the yard and felt the front flat, pulled back into the barn and took the truck to town...
Ain`t had no Blow out as yet...
Slung a chain through the case on my `71cb750, it STOPPED!!!
Skidded to a stop ~ just as I hit fifth it come off... (85MPH common fifth gear change)
Yeah, I had dirty shorts, I was NOT embarASSed either...
Dennis
T - 10
 

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"Do Blowouts = wipeout " No, not really . When ever you feel the bike getting loose under you for any reason, just let off the throttle, and coast down to a safer speed to pull over . Don't use time to think what it could be, just get slowed down without the brakes. Over the years I've pulled over a coupe times thinking a tire blew out, but it was just the way the road made the bike track. So I learned just to get off the throttle when something doesn't feel right, then check it out when I'm stopped. The front one is pretty obvious when it goes, and the it's a bear to control, the rear is just a loose feeling. I rode home ( 5miles) one day with a front tire gone, had to do it in first gear only, it was either that, or walk, didn't have cell phones back then, and I was on the side of the highway, and only 17yrs. old.
 
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