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2009 Aero 750
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've conquered many of my fears of riding, but riding in the rain is still one of them. Living in the Pacific Northwest, riding in the rain will likely double my available riding time.

Who out there rides in the rain and what tips can you offer?

Thanks!
 
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I've ridden in the rain before. Was riding to Dallas from San Antonio and started raining in middle of the trip.

Only thing I didn't like was pants being wet but dries quickly as you ride once it stop raining.

Advice I have is be careful when it starts due to oil on the road. I would stay on left lane since water usually flow out to side of road taking oil from middle. Ride slow and take it easy on curves for 30 mins or so.
 

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Rainex FOR PLASTIC on the outside of your visor. A good antifog on the inside to help with visibility. I agree with Secretblend , stay left, near the crown of the road to help avoid the puddles on the low side of the road. Increase your following distance for braking. Assume that NONE of the cars can see you. Defense, defense, defense. I rode home from work one day with it raining so hard that cars were pulling over under the overpasses. When I got home, my boots had water up above my ankles! That was from what soaked in and ran down my pants legs. Really wet day. I would rather ride in snow than rain. Good luck and be really careful.
 

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A good rain suit. I rode all the way across Texas on my 1978 Yamaha 3-cylinder 750 at 114 mph in the pouring rain. I was 29 then and lucky as hell. Now, if it even looks like rain, my girl stays in the garage. My personal opinion is extended rain on your bike is not a good thing.
 

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If you're riding far enough, often enough, you will ride in the rain.

I had planned to make a trip today to a destination about two hours away. As I type this, there's a thunderstorm and the rest of the day doesn't look so great either. On top of that, it's not very warm.
I don't have to leave for a few more hours, so I'm playing the waiting game and watching the radar.

If it was a long-planned weekend or a long tour, I'd head out in the storm. Been there, done that.
But for a little one-off trip like today, maybe not. If it's not going to be an enjoyable ride, I may pass.

I use a Frogg Toggs rain suit with heat patches where the exhaust touches, and Rain-X on my face shield.
A cheap pair of waterproof gloves is in the kit, too. Once you've taken the steps too keep yourself (mostly) dry, your biggest concern is to dedicate yourself to riding safely.

The longest I've ridden in a hard rain? Ten hours straight coming back from a trip to the Smoky Mountains. It was miserable, and my boots were soaked through enough to make squishing noises as I walked.

You will eventually dry off :), eventually.
And, your bike is not a sugar cube. It won't melt in the rain.
 

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2003 VT1100C Spirit
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Rain? No big deal! Get some good rain gear and you'll be set.

One very important thing -- Braking! Use mostly your front brake while stoping or slowing down. If you use your rear brake on a wet road, your bike can whip around faster than you can say, "Road rash."

I've ridden all day in the rain across Michigan's upper peninsula and into Wisconsin, ridden through severe thunderstorms across Iowa (Watch out for lightening!), ridden in near freezing rain through South Texas and ridden in foggy rain across West Virginia.

The worst part of riding in all that rain was cleaning the bike afterwords!

Ride safe!

🌨
 

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I have ridden in the rain many, many times. Now a days I won’t leave the house to ride if it is raining but if it rains while I am out I just deal with it or suit up and deal with it. As has been said increase your following distance and try to plan your maneuvers more in advance if possible. Probably the two best pieces of advice I could give is do not do anything quick, emergencies excluded, and some time that it is lightly raining go for a ride to get some feeling for it.

Back in 2017 we met a group from this forum in Robbinsville, N.C. We rode Moonshiner 28, The Dragon, and the Cherahola Parkway. It was a great weekend until Sunday morning when we woke up to a steady rain. Since we had rode the bikes there trailering them home was not an option. So we packed up everything and waterproofed it as well as we could, suited up and struck out for home 185 miles to the south west. It rained for 150 of the 185 miles home. Had no problems out of the bikes, everything stayed dry and we barely got wet.

My rain outfit is Frog Tog bib overalls and a Frog Tog jacket with the hood cut off. I have a couple of long Velcro strips that I wrap around my right leg to keep the pants from getting to the exhaust pipes. I am usually wearing my half helmet and riding glasses (clear or dark safety glasses), I don’t usually have a problem with the rain hitting my face. A few years ago I added a windshield to my bike. This changed the wind and rain currents and that is why I went with the bib overalls rain pants. It helps with the rain that blows up from under the windshield.

Eric


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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Good advice, all! I've been looking at rainsuits, so I'll pop for one soon. I grew up in the Midwest (Des Moines and Kansas City) and moved to the PNW about 20 years ago. Rain here is pretty wimpy (at least here West of the mountains) compared to KC. (I've always missed thunderstorms). I like the idea of practicing in some light rain. My concern is doing long coastal rides or going up to the islands and having it rain on me.
 

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If you have good tires, and follow the safety tips mentioned here, it’s really a non-issue. But it can also depend on where you are. For instance, in Southern Ontario, Canada, the first TINY bit of rain loosens the clay dust that’s sunk down into the asphalt. The resulting surface reacts very similarly to glare ice, until the rest of the rain washes it away.

Awareness is key.
 

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My favorite riding in the rain video:

Kiyonari in Rainy Donington (Qualify) - YouTube

Edit: I also ride in the rain, last year on the way to Maggie Valley, did the last 220 miles through northern Georgia and N Carolina in the rain and 48 degrees. (was 95 when we left Florida,,,)

Pay for good wet weather riding gloves, with Goretex and Thinsulate lining. Mine were old and leaked. Got some brown Jersey gloves and put them in yellow rubber kitchen gloves at a Dollar General. Not as warm but better than wet hands and 48 degrees. Frog Toggs Rain suit also failed, but it was at least 6 years old, maybe 10 and had at least a couple thousand miles in the rain. My fault for not replacing it. I liked it overall. Boot covers failed, sort of. They were the kind that slipped over the boot tip and were open on most of the bottom, worked fine on floorboards, The open part kept getting stuck on the pegs at stops. Almost dropped it a couple times. Bought new gloves and rain suit at the 1st motorcycle dealer I saw.

And to go with what others have said, it's easy to hit the front brake too hard, If there's standing water or even just heavy rain trying to run off, you could hydroplane the front wheel. It's a matter of traction vs braking pressure. I guarantee that will drop you quicker than you can react. Been there, In my defense, it was 1 AM and on my way home from work, tired, wind and pouring rain, + a brand new tire with 17 miles on it, was not scuffed in yet and I'd just finally got that last little air bubble out of the front brakes, they were performing better than before.. I'd been riding home in the rain more often than not as it was Spring. Got kind of complacent about it., came out from under an overpass, wind tried to blow me off the road, running about 50, hit the brake and was down and sliding beside the bike before I even knew it, had time to think " what happened? we're sure sliding a long ways,,," Messed up my rain suit, mesh jacket sleeve, wore the back pocket off my jeans, got a bit of road rash on my arm and wrist where the jacket sleeve pushed up. Helmet face shield scraped up, 1st car that came by just drove around me laying in the road and didn't stop. 2nd one helped me get the bike up and I rode on home.
Ride like there's eggs under the brake pedal and brake lever and gently on the throttle, you'll be fine. It's still ok to lean into the turns at pretty much normal road speeds with a little caution.
 
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Good rain gear, good waterproof boots, good helmet, good windshield, rain is no problem.
 
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I`ve ridden in the rain, but only when I caught in the rain. If they predict rain or it`s already raining , I change my riding plans.
I ride for the enjoyment, and I didn`t enjoy riding in the rain.

Some smooth two lane blacktop in my area gets very slick when wet.

I think there are just a handful of things to avoid riding mishaps.
#1- Wear a helmet
#2- Don`t ride at night
#3- Don`t drink and ride
#4- Don`t ride in the rain
#5- Don`t Speed

But, I do ride in the cold. Which is something I never thought I`d do. I`ve already went on numerous rides that started off in the 30`s, ended up in the 50`s.
'

Tire Wheel Plant Sky Fuel tank
 

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I am in Vancouver so expect rain. Our rule is we don't leave in the rain but expect to return in the rain. Good gear is mandatory. I use Frogg Toggs pants, a Tourmaster hi-vis waterproof jacket, waterproof boots and I take 2 sets of gloves (one will get soaked). I don't ride much differently than usual but that means highly aware, and ride at the speed of any traffic and I am usually in the right-hand lane. I flash brake lights when slowing but a brake light modulator would be good for poor visibility.
 

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Yes, I have ridden in the rain. Rain happens. Tips to offer, don't ride on the rainbows on the road. That is the oil washing up on the pavement and it is slick like ice. Water proof boots or boots with a drain are good. I have had my boots fill up with water a few times. I had to pour the water out and ring my socks out. A good rain is well apreciated on a really hot day. It is especially nice when it stops so you are dry when you get home.
 

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Only IF its raining ...
I keep good tires on my Baby, and ride in the rain...
I dunno IF I`d take off right now being as I need to swap front tires;)

I Prolly would,
Dennis
 

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...
It was miserable, and my boots were soaked through enough to make squishing noises as I walked.
...
I hate that feeling and sound. Worse part is if they are waterproof boots (and yes, waterproof boots will end up with water in them after long enough riding in the rain), they take forever to dry out.
 

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Red Wing Lace up boots with my chaps over them helps keep inside my boots dry :D
I bought Frogg Toggs to go OVER the Leather ...

Leather under my Frogg Toggs helps,
Dennis

;)
 

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My situation was that I couldn't wait to ride my first bike. So I took it out in the rain that night. My street had a nice hairpin turn, and I learned what traction meant when I tossed it down the road. I banked the hairpin like it was dry [driving the car that is], and my fear of rain [watt fear] happened the very first time as a [minutes green] new rider.

At my age I still stick my A out. Couple of month ago figured I play in the rain. Short burst of rain going home, was windy on top of it. Bike was on a long straight uphill grade; took it up to 90mph, gust of wind move the bike almost to the next lane, and cooled it.

WOT I'm saying is you can go a lot faster in the ran than you think. Ride this side of hydroplaning and you'll be find. Being smooth helps. By that I mean, watch the truckers change lanes. Takes a long time to keep the truck straight and smooth at the transition. Basically that how you ride wet or dry.
 

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When my little sister first started riding i told her that if you don’t get wet once in a while you’re not riding enough. One thing to remember is stay off the paint It’s like ice slippery. Last year we took a trip on the blue ridge parkway. Rained every day on us. Crossed over newfound gap in the rain and dark. Had to stand up and look over windshield at times to see the road. Road up to mt mitchell in the rain and wind. The last 100 miles of the parkway was rain and fog. I could see the taillight of the bike in front of me and the yellow line. Just take your time and dont get in no hurry.


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