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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This question has come up from time to time and
obviously, people have differing opinions.
Some people will buy used helmets, others won't.
Some will pay $500 for a helmet, other will pay $29.95 for one.

I personally won't use a helmet that has been dropped.
To me, it's just THAT important.

I'm not here to convince anyone that they should or should not
keep wearing a dropped helmet or wonder how hard you have to hit
it before it's rendered useless... BUT for those of us among us
that have often wondered about just how hard a helmet take
be hit or what kind of smack it can take before being rendered unless,
I found this product.

I was searching CruiserCustomizing's website, looking for a few goodies
and chrome pieces when I came across this. It's simply a shock sensor
that tells you if your helmet should be replaced or not, based on
the shock it has taken.

While I don't think I would rely on this thing 100%, it's definately a good
"guide" or "gauge" that might help some people answer their question.
No, I'm not selling them nor am I affiliated with CruiserCustomizing in anyway. Just saw this and thought it might be of interest to some of the members.

Helmet Shock Sensor

 

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Here at work I use shock sensors on Plasmas displays that I ship out. Red on those indicates a force of 50g's.

Not sure if this product is the same, (it should be it's a fairly universial standard), but 50g's is a lot of force. It would take much more than a simple 5 foot drop to make 50g's of impact.

Out of curisioty I think I'll take a few home and put them on an old helmet that I no longer wear and see what happens with diffrent "drops".

hmmmmmm, might be interesting to see what it takes to go "red".

8)

PS. I have no problems wearing one after a drop.
 

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If a helmet is considered ruined after a 30 inch (like from your seat to the ground) drop ... just how good would it be to protect you in a real event?

I would have no problem wearing a helmet that has fallen in that scenario...

If I owned a helmet manufacturing plant, I'd have a different opinion of course :lol:
 

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cliffd64 said:
If a helmet is considered ruined after a 30 inch (like from your seat to the ground) drop ... just how good would it be to protect you in a real event? :lol:
That's a good point. My helmet fell from the seat to the ground the other day while warming up and my first thought was it shouldn't be ruined.....still.
 

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My theory, totally unscientific:
If I drop the helmet from shoulder height (or seat height, or handlebar height, etc) and there's no head inside it to compress the foam, I'll judge by the external appearance. In other words if the shell isn't visibly compromised other than some surface scratches, I still use it.
If it goes down in a fall with a head inside it, hard enough to mark the external surface of the shell, then I'll assume the foam got compressed and it's adios. Ain't happened yet, so I can't promise I won't cheap out, but that's my story for now.
FWIW I'm a $40 helmet kind of guy, and I'm danged if I'll replace even a cheap helmet just because some bozo :oops: couldn't hang on to a lemon-pledge slicked lid...
-G
 

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shouldn't the shock sensor be placed on the head :shock: rather than the outside of a helmet? you know, that's where it counts. :lol: It'd make a new fashion statement - and I wonder how many G's you get off someone smacking you in the back of the head for that :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

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cliffd64 said:
If a helmet is considered ruined after a 30 inch (like from your seat to the ground) drop ... just how good would it be to protect you in a real event?

I would have no problem wearing a helmet that has fallen in that scenario...

If I owned a helmet manufacturing plant, I'd have a different opinion of course :lol:
Not that the helmet "failed" in the 30 inch drop.
But all helmets have ONE good use in them.
Once they have been subjected to stress which compromises the inner liner or the outer shell they are toast.

A fall from 30 inches should not result in the stress levels to call the helmet "used."
But it is your melon we're talking about.

I would never compromise one whit where my head is concerned.

litnin, good idea!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
rickbb said:
Here at work I use shock sensors on Plasmas displays that I ship out. Red on those indicates a force of 50g's.

Not sure if this product is the same, (it should be it's a fairly universial standard), but 50g's is a lot of force. It would take much more than a simple 5 foot drop to make 50g's of impact.

Out of curisioty I think I'll take a few home and put them on an old helmet that I no longer wear and see what happens with diffrent "drops".

hmmmmmm, might be interesting to see what it takes to go "red".

8)

PS. I have no problems wearing one after a drop.
Cool! Yes, please let us know what happens.
If possible, try to test it with a hit with the sensor mounted away from the impact point
and mounted directly at the point of impact. The point of impact should
theoretically have a spike that 'might' blow one of those sensors.


cliffd64 said:
If a helmet is considered ruined after a 30 inch (like from your seat to the ground) drop ... just how good would it be to protect you in a real event?

I would have no problem wearing a helmet that has fallen in that scenario...

If I owned a helmet manufacturing plant, I'd have a different opinion of course :lol:
Uh... Not sure I follow your logic there.

Your automobile has crumple zones in it for high speed impact events.
The idea is that during a high speed impact, the crumple effect will absorb
and displace energy to keep it from coming back to you.
If you wreck your car running 35 mph and it mashes up the front end,
are you going to say "if it crumples up at 35 mph, how am I going to know
it's going to be effective at 70mph."

A helmet, while a different approach, works on the same basic prinicple of
crumple zones in a car.
The helmet is designed to splay and displace energy across the shell.
Then, the cushion (foam,etc.) is designed to absorb the rest.

Once it's taken a helmet has taken a 30 inch drop, it's integrity MAY be
changed.... and MAY not be apparant.
 

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Once it's taken a helmet has taken a 30 inch drop, it's integrity MAY be
changed.... and MAY not be apparant.
And possibly more important than the length of the fall is what the helmet hits at the end -- a concrete slab is certainly more "disagreeable" than a couch cushion, for example. And besides that, there's an infinite number of impact points on the helmet and I'm certain that the harmful results are not distributed equally amongst them. These are among the reasons why there is no definitive answer as to how much damage a "generic" drop might cause.

I like the idea of a sensor. I've seen several that might work well on helmets -- and ones with different (force?) ratings. But I'm certain that the helmet manufacturers would be very disinclined to make them "factory installed" items -- lest a helmet somehow gets delivered to a consumer with the sensor in the red! (Oh, you thought shippers, stockers and salesmen never dropped a box? :D )

FWIW, I buy $500+ helmets because it's a better fit to the value I place on my head. And I get a new one every 5 years. (I do keep the old ones around; the kids like to play with them, especially around Halloween.)
 
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