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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Was given a 2004 Honda Shadow VT750C and it has been sitting for the past couple years, had been started up every now and then and was consistently added fuel stabilizer to it. Wondering if there is anything else in getting it running again and tuned up. So far I have or am going to:

- New Battery

-> (Put new battery on tonight and got power but the main fuse was blown so had to replace, haven’t fired it up yet) <-

  • Drain Fuel/filter
  • Change Oil/filter
  • Air Filter
  • Spark Plugs

Looking for the best stuff to make it shine again with all the surface rust!

Heard about putting oil in the head to make sure things don’t seize up when firing up?


Was hoping on not having to take the carb off and just run some new fuel to wash it through.

Any input help for things to look out for or anything I’m missing and any good visual resources that can help me work through this bike

Also! It has about 60k on it, any ideas what that would run for price wise?

Thanks!
 

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'83 VT750C
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It’s up to you. Some just punch the start button with some starting fluid sprayed into it and let it rip... but I’m not one of those people. Saw a video with a ‘barn find’ ’67 Corvette where the guy did that, and ended up bending a rod because of a sticking valve.

You could try running some Seafoam or cleaner through the carbs, and soaking them, but if it’s been sitting for any length of time with ethanol gas in it, they’ll be gummed up for sure. Pulling the tank and cleaning/soaking it, along with pulling the carbs and at least opening the bowls up for inspection and cleaning of the jets and insides would be recommended. This is good to acclimatize yourself with the bike. Lots of videos to guide you, as well.

I’d change the oil and filter. These will be sacrificial, cause I’d change them again once the bike was ready to leave the garage. Then I’d remove the spark plugs and pour some oil (I use standard home-use 3-in-1, but any should do) into each cylinder. Let it soak for a little bit, then remove the crank bolt cover on the right side of the engine, towards the front. Turn the crank clockwise with a ratchet a few times to get the oil coating the cylinder bores and rings. Then I’d use a power ratchet to get the crank spinning at faster speeds, which should get the oil pumping up through the heads and onto the valvetrain, ‘priming’ it.

Then, the crank bolt cover gets replaced and the spark plugs reinstalled, if they still look good, and it’s ready to test start.
 

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you mentioned stabilizer was regularly added to it? did the po keep pouring it into the old gas or was fresh gas and stabilizer used? blue magic metal polishing compound or never dull will do wonders for the metal. once you do as above mentioned and get the rest taken care of you may find it still needs the carbs done. however once she tries to fire she will smoke for a bit with that oil in the cylinders but it might not want to run or start correctly for a bit until everything gets run through so keep at it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
you mentioned stabilizer was regularly added to it? did the po keep pouring it into the old gas or was fresh gas and stabilizer used? blue magic metal polishing compound or never dull will do wonders for the metal. once you do as above mentioned and get the rest taken care of you may find it still needs the carbs done. however once she tries to fire she will smoke for a bit with that oil in the cylinders but it might not want to run or start correctly for a bit until everything gets run through so keep at it.
It was added to the old gas
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It’s up to you. Some just punch the start button with some starting fluid sprayed into it and let it rip... but I’m not one of those people. Saw a video with a ‘barn find’ ’67 Corvette where the guy did that, and ended up bending a rod because of a sticking valve.

You could try running some Seafoam or cleaner through the carbs, and soaking them, but if it’s been sitting for any length of time with ethanol gas in it, they’ll be gummed up for sure. Pulling the tank and cleaning/soaking it, along with pulling the carbs and at least opening the bowls up for inspection and cleaning of the jets and insides would be recommended. This is good to acclimatize yourself with the bike. Lots of videos to guide you, as well.

I’d change the oil and filter. These will be sacrificial, cause I’d change them again once the bike was ready to leave the garage. Then I’d remove the spark plugs and pour some oil (I use standard home-use 3-in-1, but any should do) into each cylinder. Let it soak for a little bit, then remove the crank bolt cover on the right side of the engine, towards the front. Turn the crank clockwise with a ratchet a few times to get the oil coating the cylinder bores and rings. Then I’d use a power ratchet to get the crank spinning at faster speeds, which should get the oil pumping up through the heads and onto the valvetrain, ‘priming’ it.

Then, the crank bolt cover gets replaces and the spark plugs reinstalled, if they still look good, and it’s ready to test start.
Thank you !
 

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It was added to the old gas
definitely draining the fuel on that then. stabilizer is supposed to be added to untreated gas. if you continually add more stabilizer into already stabilizer treated gas you end up with more stabilizer than gas. the stabilizer doesn't go away so adding more just ups the percentage of stabilizer in the gas.
 

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2006 Shadow Aero 750
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If the tank has old contaminated gas, rust, trash it all goes into the petcock screwing it up then on to the carb screwing it up. A patient person (not me) would remove the tank and remove the petcock then flush the tank and inspect it with one of those video cam thingies. The petcock needs to be dissassembled and cleaned. Then flush the carb with fresh gas and give her a crank and see what happens. If nothing else you have eliminated some major contributors to the fuel department.
 

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1986 Honda Shadow VT1100
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I was in a similar situation last fall, my bike when I got it had sat for years in a basement. The hydraulic fluids (brake and clutch) are probably shot and need flushed... I had to rebuild my slave cylinder as well, brake fluid gets nasty when it suits to long. Not that you need it to fire it up but the last thing you want is to go for that first ride and have the clutch or brake not work. I also changed out my final drive oil to be safe.
 

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Stabilizer can slow down gas going bad, but it can't prevent it. Gasoline engines stored for long periods should be drained of all gasoline. Running them for a few minutes each month to keep the oil circulated and seals moist, won't use up a full tank fast enough to keep it fresh. so I concur with purging the tank and fuel system.
 
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