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I've been riding again for two months after thirty years. Today in a left hand turn lane traffic ahead takes off and the pickup in front of me jams on his breaks when the turn signal goes yellow. I always use both breaks, but locked up the rear. I was so surprised that the rear skidded left leaving me out of control. Luckily I was able to not hit him and keep the bike from laying down. I thought that if I'm going straight, and locked up the rear tire the bike would continue to go straight. What a surprise!
 

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I've been riding again for two months after thirty years. Today in a left hand turn lane traffic ahead takes off and the pickup in front of me jams on his breaks when the turn signal goes yellow. I always use both breaks, but locked up the rear. I was so surprised that the rear skidded left leaving me out of control. Luckily I was able to not hit him and keep the bike from laying down. I thought that if I'm going straight, and locked up the rear tire the bike would continue to go straight. What a surprise!
Nope...if you lock that rear tire, it is going to get squirrely on you really quick-like.
 

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This will be a very hard lesson if you are going at speed and manage to lock up the rear and go into a skid. If you let go of the brake when you are crossed up, the rear is likely to grab and shoot the bike back up vertical so fast that you will go flying over the other side. It's called a high side.

The bike can skid straight, but usually there is some influence, either in your lean or bar action, or road, or whatever may disrupt that straight line and you start to skid.
 

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Yeah ya gotta watch them pickups.
I just started riding after a 14 year break and took a basic riders course even tho I know how to ride, it did actually teach me some stuff, and was kinda fun, one of the things they stressed was how to brake, I thought the class was worth the $125 .
 

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^^^ on the rear tire lock up. I don't know if you took a basic MC class, but they discuss why this happens and the result. In a 'panic' stop, the center of gravity of the MC shifts forward, taking weight and traction off the rear tire and shifting it to the front tire. You need to progressively apply more pressure to the front brake and lighten up on the rear brake. Once you lock up the rear, the smallest steering or balance inputs will cause the bike to get squirley very quickly, and if not handled correctly can result in a high siding which is really bad.

First, read up on panic stops, then go out and practice emergency stopping. Then practice some more, then practice every time you are out riding so it becomes instinctive to you.
 

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Yup, once that rear wheel locks up it gets fun, fast.. I actually practice locking up the rear wheel in a parking lot when it's time to change out the rear tire, but I have only once ever locked up my rear wheel on the road - and it was in Phoenix of all places..

Because of that practice it was just another day in the saddle.. I think it freaked out the drivers to either-side of me more to see me slide to stop in a cloud of blue smoke :lol:
 

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Yup, once that rear wheel locks up it gets fun, fast.. I actually practice locking up the rear wheel in a parking lot when it's time to change out the rear tire, but I have only once ever locked up my rear wheel on the road - and it was in Phoenix of all places..

Because of that practice it was just another day in the saddle.. I think it freaked out the drivers to either-side of me more to see me slide to stop in a cloud of blue smoke :lol:

Freak....


Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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Yup, once that rear wheel locks up it gets fun, fast.. I actually practice locking up the rear wheel in a parking lot when it's time to change out the rear tire, but I have only once ever locked up my rear wheel on the road - and it was in Phoenix of all places..

Because of that practice it was just another day in the saddle.. I think it freaked out the drivers to either-side of me more to see me slide to stop in a cloud of blue smoke :lol:
If you wait for a little sprinkle, there won't be any smoke. We call it slidin weather, even when it's pouring...
 

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If you wait for a little sprinkle, there won't be any smoke. We call it slidin weather, even when it's pouring...
Arizona unfortunately is less than obliging when it comes to precipitation.... I dont know, the grand entrance appeals to me.. Blue smoke, neon, and flashy headlight.. Hard to beat that kind of performance.. :lol:
 

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I've been riding again for two months after thirty years. Today in a left hand turn lane traffic ahead takes off and the pickup in front of me jams on his breaks when the turn signal goes yellow. I always use both breaks, but locked up the rear. I was so surprised that the rear skidded left leaving me out of control. Luckily I was able to not hit him and keep the bike from laying down. I thought that if I'm going straight, and locked up the rear tire the bike would continue to go straight. What a surprise!
If you don't follow too close for the speed you are going you don't have to worry about locking up the rear brake and having the back end fishtail on you.
 

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As others have indicated, practice your accident avoidance and panic stops. There are a lot of isolated country roads not far from my home. I routinely go out, treat dark spots, cracks, tar marks, pot holes, etc. all as obstacles and practice my last second push and push, to turn the bike and immediately return to my original path.

It is one of the skills they teach you in a motorcycle safety course.


Braking
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i-f34n_74oM

Slow Speed Turning
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v-BDrAxjAFI
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks for the comments. I did take the motorcycle safety course, and practiced quick stops, but I think there is a difference between making a quick stop knowing your going to in practice and actually reacting to an emergency within milliseconds. At least for an inexperienced rider like me. Vito's comment is dead on, I could have avoided the situation by not following so close.
 
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