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or some call it black ice. First time I heard the term Florida Ice was shortly after moving here back in 1986. I approached a toll booth, not fast at all, and when I hit the brakes (about 30 feet from the booth) the van tires locked up and I slid about 6 feet past it. The toll booth operator called it Florida Ice and said people slide past them quite frequently.

Anywho... I ran into some the other day, doing about 35 mph. It had only been raining lightly for about 10 to 15 minutes when I approached a curve. When I entered the curve I lightly applied the brake and felt the rear end slide. I immediately pulled in the clutch and straightened out as much as I could (didn't want to lean any more than I had to). Ended up about 1 foot into the gravel shoulder but at least I had good grip there. That was definitely one of those heart pumping moments.
 

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It can't be black ice when it's warm out. You won't see(or not see it) it until it right around freezing. You more then likely hit some antifreeze, oil or sand but it feels about the same.
 

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Florida Ice is the oil slick you get when it first starts to rain. The oil rides on top of the water but there hasn't been enough rain to wash it off the road. It is something I'm always on the look out for when there are wet roads. Obviously this happens everywhere but I think they call it Florida Ice only because we have short bursts of rain almost every afternoon during the summer and it's the closest thing to ice that we have on the roads (for central and southern Florida anyway).

The other thing that makes it dangerous is the how the showers behave down here. You can't be sure how long it has been raining in an area that you are traveling. Usually, if it has been raining 15 or 20 minutes you know that the oil has been washed away but as you are traveling you might hit in area where it only started raining a few minutes ago.
 

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We get that here too.. Riding down the I-10 today, rode into a massive deluge.. For about a hundred and fifty miles that storm chased me.. Every now and again I would hit dry spots, then the heavens would open-up again and you couldn't see more than a hundred yards down the road.. All afternoon I was passing riders who were pulling over, and hiding under bridges to put thier rain gear on; me, having left my rain gear at home (idiot that I am) hoved-forth in my mesh gear, freezing my ass off .. :lol:

Yes. When it rains like that, and when that oil floats to the surface, when that foam begins to rise.. It can get kinda slippy.. Gotsta be careful..

Glad you made it through that okay!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I agree oil and rain make for some slick moments but if it rains daily I wouldn't think the oil wiuld build up.
High traffic/slow flow areas such as intersections, toll booths, etc. get a heavier build up.
Yep... high traffic for sure. Orlando... gotta love it. This particular curve gets a lot of backed up traffic around it due to a traffic light that is only a couple of hundred feet away. The other factor is that many of the showers are fairly brief. We have a saying down here... don't like the weather? Wait ten minutes and it will change. At least it is true for many afternoons.

Disclaimer: If I could afford to purchase a Harley, if I could afford to maintain a Harley, if I didn't mind their miles per gallon figures... I'd seriously consider owning a Harley. I know quite a few people who do. In other words... I really don't have anything against them but...

there are a lot of Harleys in florida that keep the roads oiled.
^^^^^^^^^ for some reason I found that very funny!

Probably because I knew a few riders in my past that owned and dealt with the Harley leakage problems. Worse one I remember was an AMF built Harley.
 
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