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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm new to this biking thing. Please forgive my ignorance.

Is there a "standard" position for the front brake lever? I know the lever can be rotated around the handlebar, but what position on the bar is "best"? Is this an individual thing? I rode bicycles for the last 22 years and in that sport the position of the levers is "standard" and then individual positions from there based on hand size and comfort. When I pull the front brake lever on my Shadow I tend to pull back on the grip and accelerate at the same time. Will changing the position on the handlebar, as in rotating the lever up or down, reduce this tendency?

Thanks
 

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You do what...? Dont touch the front brake. Problem solved.

But no, there is no locating pin to keep it in a single solitary position.
 

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You will get many different answers. Mostly is rider preference.
 

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There is a standard position. The handlebars have hole drilled in them and the brake lever housing has a nub on the underside that fits in the hole. If you are gripping the brake lever with 4 fingers you shouldn't be rotating the throttle at all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You do what...? Dont touch the front brake. Problem solved.

But no, there is no locating pin to keep it in a single solitary position.
I'm from a bicycling background. Habits are hard to break. I was a police mountain bike instructor for many years. I worked on a police mountain bike patrol for a long time. Feathering the front brake was all I ever did. I hardly ever used the rear brake. When riding in an urban setting going over curbs, up stairs, down stairs, etc the front brake is the best, as long as you know what you are doing. Guess motorcycles are different. I need to concentrate on that right foot brake pedal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
No. motorcycling is not different. Most of your braking should be with the FRONT brake.
OK, here we go. I've had 2 people say, not just in this thread, to stay off the front brake completely and 1 say to use mostly the front.

I understand that the front has more effective braking power. Why use just the rear or mostly the front?

I also understand that when the rear wheel begins to slide you actually back off the front brake to get the rear from skidding. Makes no common sense, but, it does shift your weight to the rear, applying more weight to the rear, thus stopping the skidding of the rear wheel. Works when mountain biking!! :D
 

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OK, here we go. I've had 2 people say, not just in this thread, to stay off the front brake completely and 1 say to use mostly the front.

Furhead, was just kidding. Anyone who tells you to stay off the front brake completely is an idiot, and has no idea how to control a motorcycle. They should not be given ANY attention what so ever...other than to laugh at them.

While there are situations that will be different, a motorcycle brakes pretty much the same as a bicycle. Most of the time, for average stopping....use both brakes at the same time, with the bias to the front. Very slow speed work, use rear brake only.

You have difficult terrain bicycle experience. You can likely already stop better than the average motorcycle jockey. Most riders don't have a clue...
 

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Furhead, was just kidding. Anyone who tells you to stay off the front brake completely is an idiot, and has no idea how to control a motorcycle. They should not be given ANY attention what so ever...other than to laugh at them.

*****too strongly written but you get the idea....use that front brake as its meant to be used.
 

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On older british bikes, the front had a twin leading shoe and was really the most effective of the two. That's where most of the stopping power was. I can however understand how someone would be inclined to avoid a front brake. Use it wrong and you can make things interesting real quick. On my old Goldwings, the rear pedal applied braking to the rear disk and one of the front disks together. The front lever applied braking to only one disk.
 

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There is a standard position. The handlebars have hole drilled in them and the brake lever housing has a nub on the underside that fits in the hole. If you are gripping the brake lever with 4 fingers you shouldn't be rotating the throttle at all.
This above.

Use all four of your remaining appendages to cover and use the front brake lever. Don't keep your index finger wrapped around the grip and just use the remaining three if that's what you might be doing. We call that the "pacifier"... It gives you a tendency to turn the throttle while stopping. Using all four fingers on the brake will help you to not turn the throttle at the same time. It's good practice anyway. If you ever went down, you would probably lose that index finger.
 

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While reading some AMA touring tips, I thought of you, with the question on lever placement=====>>>> Are your levers adjusted properly? When you rest your fingers on the levers, the back of your hand should be in a straight line with your arm, so your wrists aren't bent and putting pressure on your nerves.

Merry Christmas
Ann & Dennis
 

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There is a standard position. The handlebars have hole drilled in them and the brake lever housing has a nub on the underside that fits in the hole. If you are gripping the brake lever with 4 fingers you shouldn't be rotating the throttle at all.
Both my 1100 Spirit and Valk brake/clutch lever assemblies are a separate "clamps" which are adjustable and w/o holes drilled. If one looks really close there are little dimples in the chrome that factory uses to place them @ in production.

To the OP, be aware how much you adjust them because the position of the brake fluid resivior being level for fluid maintenence in the future.
 

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There is a standard position. The handlebars have hole drilled in them and the brake lever housing has a nub on the underside that fits in the hole. If you are gripping the brake lever with 4 fingers you shouldn't be rotating the throttle at all.
My 88 doesn't have this. Maybe it's just too old?
 

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Both my 1100 Spirit and Valk brake/clutch lever assemblies are a separate "clamps" which are adjustable and w/o holes drilled. If one looks really close there are little dimples in the chrome that factory uses to place them @ in production.

To the OP, be aware how much you adjust them because the position of the brake fluid resivior being level for fluid maintenence in the future.
Mine have these dimples as well. A very small center punch mark.
 
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