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i have a full tank of gas in my aero from the 24th of december, weather not been good for riding since then. ok to still add fuel stabilizer to the tank, or is the gas not "fresh" enough? just do not want to do more harm than good. all feedback appreciated. ps thanks for all the responses to my motorcycle music posting - have a great cd in mind based on the songs listed! 8)
 

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No, it's not too late. Just be sure to run the engine long enough to get the entire thing warm, including the exhaust. You don't want any moisture laying in your mufflers, plus the fuel stabilizer will get all the way through the carbs.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
thanks for the feedback. how long is "long enough" to run the engine? in idle? a certain number of miles? sorry for my stupidy, i know this probably pretty basic for most forum members.
 

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PUT THE STABALIZER IN THE TANK, SHAKE BIKE TO MIX, START AND LET BIKE RUN FOR 10 TO 20 MIN THIS WILL ALLOW THE STABIL TO GET INTO THE CARBS(SEE YOU NEXT SUMMER.)
 

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I use STABIL this time of the year.
Maybe I ride tomorrow.
Maybe for a month the bike will sit.
I keep gas cans around for this reason, treated with STABIL.
This debate will go on forever.
Friend who is certified mechanic says all US gas must pass to last a year.
Who really knows what it is at the pump?
For a thousand years we did not care or ask.
All I notice is a little more exhaust smoke sometimes with STABIL.
It is OK to ride with it seems.
Just do as you want, and most likely, you will be fine.
 

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rockyjr said:
i have a full tank of gas in my aero from the 24th of december, weather not been good for riding since then. ok to still add fuel stabilizer to the tank, or is the gas not "fresh" enough? just do not want to do more harm than good. all feedback appreciated. ps thanks for all the responses to my motorcycle music posting - have a great cd in mind based on the songs listed! 8)
rocky,
It's still okay to add fuel stabilizer.......
One thing I wanted to mention is this: Don't over do it with the StaBil. Too much StaBil tends to foul sparkplugs and doesn't protect the fuel any better. In fact, I use slightly less than what the bottle says to use and it still keeps my fuel fresh over the long winter storage period.
Phil
 

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Rocky just to add to what Phil said I would also recommend in the future, since your tank is already full, to make your last fill up (before storage or long periods of non use) with non-oxygenated fuel. Alcohol can really do a number on carbs even if you do add fuel stabilizer.
 

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fuel

Grampa said:


make your last fill up (before storage or long periods of non use) with non-oxygenated fuel.

Gramps, would you explain that?

Jim
 

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Re: fuel

Donald1684 said:
Grampa said:


make your last fill up (before storage or long periods of non use) with non-oxygenated fuel.

Gramps, would you explain that?

Jim
Jim,
I think Grampa is talking about fuels like ethenol blends. I don't know that much about these fuels but I've heard they're not good for rubber parts in certain types of carburators.

Maybe Gramps will chime in and explain it better than I did.
Phil
 

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Re: fuel

Phil said:
Donald1684 said:
Grampa said:


make your last fill up (before storage or long periods of non use) with non-oxygenated fuel.

Gramps, would you explain that?

Jim
Jim,
I think Grampa is talking about fuels like ethanol blends. I don't know that much about these fuels but I've heard they're not good for rubber parts in certain types of carburetors.

Maybe Gramps will chime in and explain it better than I did.

Phil
That's it Phil. Up here in Minnesota that's about all we get is ethanol blended fuels. The alcohol can make for serious problems in carburetors if allowed to sit for an extended amount of time. I've had to clean out carbs in both my wife's bike & my outboard which I had added Stabil to prior to storage. So now I fuel up at the end of the season with non-oxygenated fuel. I was able to find the location of stations that carry non-oxy fuel through http://www.msra.com/NonOxygenatedFuel/Non-OxyFuel.htm web site. You may be able to do the same for your state.
Hope this helps.
 

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Re: fuel

Phil said:
[Jim,
I think Grampa is talking about fuels like ethenol blends. I don't know that much about these fuels but I've heard they're not good for rubber parts in certain types of carburators.
Modern vehicles do not have rubber o-rings and such
and they are not affected... They don't use rubber anymore,
they use what is called Nitrile and it's not as easily affected as
rubber was. Nitrile is very resistant against most corrosive chemicals.

The problem is that is can sometimes cause corrosion due to a chemical
reaction with the brass and aluminum, which makes up the carbs.
You'll get some crusty and corrosive results on the brass jets and tubes
and it may oxide on the aluminum housing, leaving deposits that
can clog up the orfices in the carburetor.
 

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I replaced the petcocks on my 78 Bonneville. After five days, the o-rings swelled up enough to shut off the gas. Bought another set from a different supplier, after three days the o-rings swelled up and shut off the gas. The third and much more expensive pair of petcocks is brass in aluminum with no o-rings. Problem solved.

I have owned this Bonneville almost 15 years and never opened up the carbs, so I think it is safe to say that everything from 1978 and newer is nitrile.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nitrile_rubber
 

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You could just shut of the petcock, and run it until it stalls, and then open it up and let the Stabil gas fill the carbs. and restart it.
 
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