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How can I know that when I press the button and choose Premium, that it really is Premium coming out of that hose? And nowadays it all comes from one hose, not three like it used to be. Around here, at least. So at best, if the last person bought regular and the next person buys Premium, the Premium is diluted by the regular fuel in the hose from the nozzle back to the tank.

Aviation fuel comes in different octanes and is dyed. 100LL is blue, for example.
If your using Premium in your Shadow, you wasting your money. Only needs 87 octane gas.
 

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How can I know that when I press the button and choose Premium, that it really is Premium coming out of that hose? And nowadays it all comes from one hose, not three like it used to be. Around here, at least. So at best, if the last person bought regular and the next person buys Premium, the Premium is diluted by the regular fuel in the hose from the nozzle back to the tank.
You can't. Wouldn't matter much if you're putting 15+ gallons into a car to have maybe half a gallon of the previous buyer's choice mixed into your fuel. Makes a very big difference if you're only putting 2 to 3 gallons into a motorcycle tank.

Just think what that could mean if the previous buyer filled up with E15.
 

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How can I know that when I press the button and choose Premium, that it really is Premium coming out of that hose?
Whatever the last buyer bought is still in the hose but its not really a problem except for very small tanks. The hose is typically 8 ft long and largest inside diameter is 1" so can only contain at most .32 gallons of fuel.
In Canada most pump hoses are 5/8" inside diameter so would contain about 1/2 litre of fuel or 1/2 quart US.

Based on the (R+M)/2 AKI specs, if you fill about 2.5 gallons (10 litres) no matter what was in the pump hose pr inside diameter you will be back in spec. If you are still concerned, look for pumps with shorter hoses.

For filling small engines (lawnmowers outboards etc) I fill a portable fuel tank with at least 2.5 gallons.
 

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If your using Premium in your Shadow, you wasting your money. Only needs 87 octane gas.

I disagree. I only run premium in my bike along with all small engines and snow mobile. Using regular gas will lead to greater buildup in your carbs and lead to poor performance. Every mechanic I know tells me the same thing and they all run premium for the same reason. For the $1.50/tank? Save yourself the headache
 

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I disagree. I only run premium in my bike along with all small engines and snow mobile. Using regular gas will lead to greater buildup in your carbs and lead to poor performance. Every mechanic I know tells me the same thing and they all run premium for the same reason. For the $1.50/tank? Save yourself the headache
Sorry but Premium fuel doesn't have any more cleaner then 87. It's not going to help keep your carbs any cleaner then 87 and those mechanics are full of something smelly. Your mileage may even be suffering because of using premium.
 

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Premium fuel has no ethanol in it, it keeps your carbs clean in that it won't gel during storage. It makes no difference if you're riding it out (and in fact as pointed out is not recommended). I use premium for the next to last and last fill up before my bikes hibernation to keep my tank, hoses and injectors clean. The rest of the year I use regular. I also use super/premium before I summerize my sled, and in my rarely used generator and (when I had and needed) lawnmower and snowblower. Super is great for anything you use very rarely and the store (not the case with bikes and regular people car and trucks).

Dingo.
 

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Premium fuel has no ethanol in it, it keeps your carbs clean in that it won't gel during storage...
If by "premium" you mean higher octane there is nothing in a higher octane fuel that will reduce varnishing. In fact a 15% ethanol mixture may be beneficial to storage as it will absorb some moisture, however filling the tank to reduce the effect of condensation is the recommended storage procedure. For added protection and for longer periods a fuel stabilizer can be added.

There is absolutely no benefit in running an engine with a fuel the engine does not require. There is no benefit to storing an engine with a fuel it does not require.

G.
 

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I disagree. I only run premium in my bike along with all small engines and snow mobile. Using regular gas will lead to greater buildup in your carbs and lead to poor performance. Every mechanic I know tells me the same thing and they all run premium for the same reason. For the $1.50/tank? Save yourself the headache
These fuels are marketed as "Supreme" and "Premium" to make you feel good about using it (unnecessarily) ...But There's no real difference between fuels as far as detergents within the same brand. The ONLY real difference between fuels of the same brand is it's ability to ignite under pressure and heat..

Octane prevents pre-ignition.. The More Octane, the less likely the fuel will self ignite prematurely without spark, under Pressure and heat..

Higher compression engines require higher octane levels..

As far as the deposits.. No, octane has nothing to do with that, the detergents which are blended into all fuels of any brand are pretty-much of a muchness.. Only the Octane level (and cool name) varies..

Not knowing that.. A customer might want to run "Premium" or Supreme" fuels in their beloved engines.. Just because they THINK it's a better grade of fuel, when it's not.. It really isn't..

Unless your engine calls for it, when it comes to higher octane content - the engine just doesn't need it - and doesn't benefit from it.. It doesn't burn hotter, or cleaner, or any of that..

Now, there are differences in detergents and additives from brand-to-brand though, and some brand fuels ARE Better than others..

^^ All this is what I have been able to conclude as somebody who ran Premium in all his cars for YEARS, until a really on-the-ball, old-timey, super-wrench and a good friend of mine, who also used to professionally race cars and bikes, told me that there was no real upside to premium fuels if they are not needed..

I was determined to prove him wrong.. So spent a LOT of time researching these things, trying my absolute best to find one, single, extra sliver of Gold in running Premium Fuels when you don't need to..

:sad: ...There's None :sad:

You don't need to take anyone's word for it.. Look into it yourself, from the dry science side, not from a "A buddy told me, so must be true" angle..

Sorry but Premium fuel doesn't have any more cleaner then 87. It's not going to help keep your carbs any cleaner then 87 and those mechanics are full of something smelly. Your mileage may even be suffering because of using premium.
^^^ Yup ..This guy...
 

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Premium fuel has no ethanol in it, it keeps your carbs clean in that it won't gel during storage. It makes no difference if you're riding it out (and in fact as pointed out is not recommended). I use premium for the next to last and last fill up before my bikes hibernation to keep my tank, hoses and injectors clean. The rest of the year I use regular. I also use super/premium before I summerize my sled, and in my rarely used generator and (when I had and needed) lawnmower and snowblower. Super is great for anything you use very rarely and the store (not the case with bikes and regular people car and trucks).

Dingo.
Not all States have ethanol free premium plus I don't believe ethanol is going to make that much a difference for a few months of storage. I've never had an issue with it and some years my bike is in the garage more then it's on the road.
 

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I'm with the camp that says running a higher octane fuel will not benefit an engine that does not require it to prevent pre-ignition. That said, I can think of one reason that it may improve (slightly) MPG and peak power. In my area all gasoline is blended with ethanol with the exception that ethanol-free fuel is still available at some stations intended for off-road or used in engines that were not designed to withstand ethanol. This non-ethanol gas is typically 91/92 octane. Because ethanol has less BTU/gallon than gasoline the blended fuel will result in lower MPG. Small difference yes but noticeable to those that measure MPG at every fuel stop. The extra cost of that fuel offsets any MPG benefit and any power difference would probably have to be measured by a dyno and not on the seat so no real reason to use it unless you need it.

As to storage, I used to believe the old adage of fill the tank up before storing it or it will get condensation in the fuel. With years of experience in storing cars/motorcycles/snowmobiles/small engines and subsequent carb cleanings I have evolved into a new practice. I believe that all gas (ethanol or non-ethanol) can varnish over time and clog up your fuel system. I now run my last tankful with a stabilizer or additive then run it till almost empty, shut off fuel, then run it till the engine dies. Then when it comes out of storage I don't have a full tank of old fuel to burn off before the engine runs right. I've never had a problem with moisture and never had a problem with gaskets or hoses drying out from being run dry. Just my experience, yours may be completely different.....
 

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... I now run my last tankful with a stabilizer or additive then run it till almost empty, shut off fuel, then run it till the engine dies. Then when it comes out of storage I don't have a full tank of old fuel to burn off before the engine runs right...
Depending on your length of storage you could be correct, however for less than a year storage, if your tank is near empty and you do not store in a temperature/humidity controlled space, you will likely get some condensation. This is negated when your tank is full. While a little condensation will not affect your engine, you will end up with oxidization (rust) in your fuel tank. In your case if you are using an ethanol blend the condensation may be absorbed. Premium brand fuel from a busy service station will be just a few days old and will last for up to 6 months without deteriorating and a fuel stabilizer will ensure the quality so you are not having to burn off really stale gas on that first tank after storage.

G.
 

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In Canada, premium or supreme is the only gas that doesn't have ethanol. Ethanol attracts mousture which is a problem in any engine be it marine, snow, genny or MC. It's not a problem when you're running it through, but sitting in a garage as temps rise and fall on their way to summer is a problem. Also, ethanol fuels gel and then turn into a bone meal type deposit which will clog passages that gas needs to flow through. I use no ethanol (in Canada that means supreme) with a stabilizer (current favourite is k200+ or good ole seafoam) before winter or summer storage on all my small engines and no ethanol all the time on others and have no problems. And on some items I keep the tanks full to the brim for storage and for plastic I empty them out all after running through some stabilizer. I never have any problems and then run the gas I have before resuming my regular ethanol added gas.

Dingo.
 

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In my "new" 84 vf700c (its a magna who knew?) it seems to have been pretty neglected and patched (a tradition I'm afraid my wallet will enforce), so I doubt its been using premium E-free, mostly I have and my personal experience is the engine runs rougher and she now pops like a machine gun so first I'm running seaform through with the petrol, changing the oil with seaform added to it, and I'm going to try 87 and see if my lousy mpg gets better and the neighborhood doesn't think I'm a drive bye when I slow down from the motorway ( which interestingly enough I might have hit a ton, accidentally of cause, coming home just to brag as I couldn't seem to get it over 80 between the wind and bike).

I hope it improves the bike even just a little would be nice and I think I read adding water to ethanol treated petrol will help separate out the ethanol so you just need to suck off the bottom 15% (5% water added + 10% of ethanol ) and wahla e-free 87. Maght be fun and giggle trying.
 

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I read adding water to ethanol treated petrol will help separate out the ethanol so you just need to suck off the bottom 15% (5% water added + 10% of ethanol ) and wahla e-free 87. Maght be fun and giggle trying.
Its the water that becomes separated not the ethanol.

G.
 

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im sorry i feel the need to correct you here "The flash point is the point at which the vapors from the fuel will ignite by means of heat, instead of spark.
It's also known as 'dieseling'. "

I haul fuel for a living and has such need to know and understand many things about it including flash points and auto ignition points
what you are talking about there is the auto ignition point not the flash point the flash point is the temperature at which the fuel will release sufficient vapor to ignite it still requires an ignition source like fire or spark. keep in mind its not the liquid fuel that's flammable its the vapor below the flash point you can drop a lit match into gasoline and it will go out nothing will burn.
of course i understand the confusion the terminology can cause the wording flash point conjures image's of a giant fireball or a flash fire

also just an fyi the flash point of gasoline is -43c -45f and is not effected by octane
 
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