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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
has anyone tried using Honda bond to fix the guide plug leaking? I ask because mine is leaking for the second time. the first time the O ring was replaced, then some sort of sealer was gobbed all over it, then a rubber plug was wedged between the plug and frame. that was a few years back. and not done by me.
Honda bond is used by the dirt bike racers, to seal crankcases without the usage of a gasket. when it dries it is hard!!! the mechanics use a hammer and chisel to break the crankcases apart. Is there any reason not to seal the guide plug in this manner?
 

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1999 VT1100C2 A. C. E.
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has anyone tried using Honda bond to fix the guide plug leaking?
Can't answer that. I did try JB Weld as an experiment. Two applications got me about 1,300 miles.

...a rubber plug was wedged between the plug and frame.
Seen this idea mentioned. Thought it was stupid as a repair though viable as a temporary patch. Seems like it won't last long given that we're mostly talking about the single-pin-crank engines that vibrate more.

Is there any reason not to seal the guide plug in this manner?
Vibration may eventually lead to cracking and failure. That's why the JB Weld didn't last.

Has anybody found a way to stop the guide plug on the 1100 ACE from leaking?
Mine has not leaked a drop in 40-something-thousand miles. Does that count as stopping it?

Three elements of the repair that I considered essential:
o new O-ring

o new guide plug Why? The old one bounced around in the hole for untold miles and was possibly undersized therefore more likely to twist loose.

o friction material placed on tab (for lack of a better word) of crankcase cover Why? The tab retains the plug. Keeping the plug from twisting prevents it from vibrating out of the hole.

When I replaced my stator last year I had to remove the crankcase cover. Some of the friction material was still there. I removed it to start anew but did not bother seeking more. I just dabbed on a big gob of RTV sealant. Time will tell how that holds up.

You can get info on repair here. Might be useful even if you're having someone else do the repair. Just be sure to read the addendum -- the instructions were put together by an Aero owner and there are differences (or errors) in part numbers and tools (a socket IIRC.).
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Thank you adlowe. The Honda bond is not as hard as jb weld can be and is oil resistant, however you are right, stopping the thing from spinning out of place is the important thing. I noticed that the gear selector is what is held in place by the plug so it seems that shifting is what causes the plug to spin, along with vibration, and not to mention normal expansion due to heat of the motor and plug pressing themselves together. Cleaning the surfaces seams most important, for without a good clean dry surface nothing will stick to hold the plug and good contact with the plug and side cover is crucial to prevent future failures.
 
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