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Discussion Starter #1
The temperature around here has been upper 90s lately during my 13 mile ride home from work. I felt my GS500 tire when I got home the other day and it was hot and the rear wheel was really too hot to touch for more than a split second. I noticed on my Shadow Spirit when I got home today the rear wheel was really hot as well as the tire. The front tire and wheel on both bikes were not nearly as hot but were more like very warm. Have any of you noticed a very hot back wheel and tire like this? At first I was concerned about a sticking back brake, but the wheel rolls freely and since both bikes had hot back wheels and tires, I am guessing that this might be normal?

It seems like if I went on a long trip in these conditions the rear wheel and tire would be even hotter and it makes me not want to go on any long trips under these conditions.
 

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This the first time you ever felt a tire after a long drive. This is normal for all tires, cars trucks and motorcycles. Is caused by friction of the tire against the road.
 

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When it's hot out and the pavement gets very hot, a too hot to touch tire/wheel is pretty much normal. There are all sorts of variables in the mix.....how aggressive you ride, the type of road surface you're riding on, under/over inflation of the tires, the load on the tires, etc. But tires will often get too hot to touch, even in cooler weather.
 

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When it's hot out and the pavement gets very hot, a too hot to touch tire/wheel is pretty much normal. There are all sorts of variables in the mix.....how aggressive you ride, the type of road surface you're riding on, under/over inflation of the tires, the load on the tires, etc. But tires will often get too hot to touch, even in cooler weather.
Double check the air pressure - that would be my guess - I do a lot of tire 'testing' by hand, and too hot to hold my hand on is rare.
 

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Tires run too hot if they're under inflated, not over inflated. That's usually the reason you see large truck tires in pieces on the highway - they ran too long, loaded, with an under inflated tire and it blew up from the heat.
I see it every day - cars and trucks af all shapes and sizes flying down the highway with under inflated tires. They don't realize how hot a tire gets with a little as 5 lbs. of air less than recommended in them.

And...NEVER ride close to a tractor-trailer or any other big comercial truck with your bike. I've seen first hand what damage they do when a tire lets go and pieces go flying. The pieces of tire contain steel belts that can literally rip your head off in a second. Stay far behind or pass them fast to stay clear of possible danger.
 

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It is 100 there today and area pavement is probably well over 120 or higher yet. Just guessing, mind you, but that might be a factor. A dragging rear brake makes your drum hot but brake heat making it all the way out to a tire is slim to none.
 

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Rear tire is larger and loaded much more heavily so it heats up more. Check air pressure and if correct think just how hot my tires get riding here in Phoenix. If the right pressure and in good condition they can take it. Just measure the temperature of black pavement when it is 115 in the sun. I have seen the news here show frying an egg on pavement.
 

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It's normal if you're running the pressure in the owner's manual for the tire size the manufacturer recommends for the bike. If the pressures are below that figure, they can overheat and come apart. Most people run the MAX pressures printed on the tire's sidewall which will not allow the tire to heat up from flexing as it rotates. The flexing of the carcass is what's generating the heat. If you want the tire to stick to the road when you lean the bike over you want it to be pretty warm. Ever watch drag racers heat their tires up before a run? Or NASCAR drivers? Hot rubber is good though there is a limit. Just make sure you have the correct pressure in it, either from the tire manufacturer or the bike manufacturer. You should see a 4 to 5 pound pressure increase after you get the tires heated up from ten miles of high speed riding. If you don't see that increase your pressure is probably too high. If you see more then 4 or 5 lbs. rise then your pressure is probably low. None of this applies to folks who are putting hundreds of pounds of gear on a touring bike going down a straight insterstate. Every time I stop for a break I feel the back and front tires and they run warm enough to touch for a few seconds but not hot enough to burn your hand. Check those pressures religiously with a good gauge. Don't use a cheap one.
 

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On my way back from Daytona to SC (467 miles) I only stopped for fuel and to pee a few times and when I would stop there would be all sorts of little rocks stuck to my tires.It was from Running so hard (80+) the entire way and the IRC Wildflares didnt like it @ all and picked up the rocks @ the gas station/rest areas when I stopped.The rear was actually melting as pieces were smudged at the tread.The tire is fine now and doesnt look none the worse for wear.I left FL it was 50 and got home it was 80 if that matters.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks to all for your responses. I do regularly check tire pressure but double checked them again and when cold they are correct. So I am concluding that all is okay. Thanks again.
 
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