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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all....haven't been here in awhile and i'm sure this question has been asked before.
Can anyone please tell me how tight the oil filter should be on my 2005 Shadow Aero 750. I plan to change the oil this weekend and rear gear fluid.
Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks B.B.

I ask because my other Bike is a 2005 Boulevard 800 and the shop says hand tight plus two turns ( i couldn't get more than a turn and a quarter, and then the filter started to crush so i left it at that )
I change the oil in my cars and the filter need only be hand tight, I thought the bike might vibrate the filter loose if it was only hand tight.
 

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shop says hand tight plus two turns
I've NEVER seen a filter tightened that much. Generally 3/4 - 1 turn after gasket touches sealing surface. I think just about all filters list on the box and/or on the side of the filter how much to tighten.

And also, like bearkatbiker said, a little fresh oil on the filter gasket.

Gumpy
 

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The manual states (I believe) that you should spin the filter on until the seal hits, then turn it 1/4 turn farther. I typically use my hand to accomplish this. It isn't hard to compress the gasket 1/4 turn worth.

Joe
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks guys, I had a feeling the shop salesman wasn't happy with me anyway, he couldn't match the deal i got in another province and didn't buy his. I wouldn't doubt he wanted me to waste a filter and get pissed off.
Quarter turn it is!!
 

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The amount of tightening the filter is generally a function of the rubber ring seal design. There's both square or round (O-ring) cross section seals. The better filters use the O-ring seal that takes more turning to seal.

If the filter is tightened to 1/4 turn for an O-ring seal, that might not be enough for a reliable seal. Overtightening a square seal can cause "wrinkling" that may also leak. Whatever you use, however you tighten it, make sure THE OLD GASKET IS GONE, and check for leaks when you start it up after re-filling with oil.

I haven't actually "counted turns" for a LONG time, I just "know" when it's tight. If you're new at it, MAKE SURE it's sealed correctly.

Gumpy
 

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Gumpy said:
The amount of tightening the filter is generally a function of the rubber ring seal design. There's both square or round (O-ring) cross section seals. The better filters use the O-ring seal that takes more turning to seal.

If the filter is tightened to 1/4 turn for an O-ring seal, that might not be enough for a reliable seal. Overtightening a square seal can cause "wrinkling" that may also leak. Whatever you use, however you tighten it, make sure THE OLD GASKET IS GONE, and check for leaks when you start it up after re-filling with oil.

I haven't actually "counted turns" for a LONG time, I just "know" when it's tight. If you're new at it, MAKE SURE it's sealed correctly.

Gumpy
But if you over-tighten the filter...you will have to put a screw driver through it in order to get it off. This is a VERY messy deal. The Service Manual states the required torque for the filter is 7 lbs/ft. A full turn on the filter would require quite a bit more torque regardless of o-ring type.

I am not disagreeing with your assessment of the different types of filters, but I have used the 1/4 turn technique on all of my vehicles and have never had a problem either removing the filter or with leaking.

Joe
 

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you will have to put a screw driver through it in order to get it off
Been there, done that, LONG ago!

I now use a strap wrench if needed. I've gotten several "vintage" cheapo cars for my newly licensed kids in recent years. Give them the once over, and more often than not the filter is overtightened. Anyone that's been to those quick oil change places are the worst.

I understand what you're saying. It's always difficult to convey to a newb wrenching their machine what's tight enough and what's too tight. That's what torque wrenches are for.

My favorite universal torque spec: "Thighten 'till it snaps, then back off a little." I think you gotta snap a few bolts to REALLY learn.

Seriously though, I use the WalMart Super-Tech filters, they do state either 3/4 or 1 full turn, don't remember which. I just tighten 'till it's tight, and can usually get it off by hand, and no leaks.

Gumpy
 

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bearkatbiker said:
hand tight.

I know this is relative to the person using the hand, but really doesn't need to be all that tight. Make sure and rub a little oil on the rubber to lubricate it before screwing.

--BB
Um What are we talking about here guys??????? :lol:
 

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Spirit_1100 said:
Gumpy said:
The amount of tightening the filter is generally a function of the rubber ring seal design. There's both square or round (O-ring) cross section seals. The better filters use the O-ring seal that takes more turning to seal.

If the filter is tightened to 1/4 turn for an O-ring seal, that might not be enough for a reliable seal. Overtightening a square seal can cause "wrinkling" that may also leak. Whatever you use, however you tighten it, make sure THE OLD GASKET IS GONE, and check for leaks when you start it up after re-filling with oil.

I haven't actually "counted turns" for a LONG time, I just "know" when it's tight. If you're new at it, MAKE SURE it's sealed correctly.

Gumpy
But if you over-tighten the filter...you will have to put a screw driver through it in order to get it off. This is a VERY messy deal. The Service Manual states the required torque for the filter is 7 lbs/ft. A full turn on the filter would require quite a bit more torque regardless of o-ring type.

I am not disagreeing with your assessment of the different types of filters, but I have used the 1/4 turn technique on all of my vehicles and have never had a problem either removing the filter or with leaking.

Joe
Spirit_1100,

I'm with you, trying to get a filter off that's been over-torqued is a major pain! On some of the machines we use, the guys tighten the filters with a strap wrench. I've had to use a chisel quite a few times on the what was left of the filter after ripping and prying with strap wrenches, srewdrivers, Channel Locks, ect.

Just tight enough to keep it from leaking plus a little more is enough to keep it from coming off. That works out to about 1/4 turn plus a little after the gasket makes contact. I can take mine off by hand, and I've never had one leak or come loose.
 
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