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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, have 3 Solaris Solo Prime 10-watt LEDs I've mounted to the bike, so I can see at night, and be seen. I have installed a Show Chrome switch on top of my brake hydraulic reservoir.

Now, I can't figure out where to attach the red and black wire from the switch. I have pulled the seat, and know I don't want to direct attach to the battery. Any ideas? I know the negative should go to ground, but have no idea where that would be, or where to attach hot.

2007 Honda Shadow Aero 750

...and, yes, I will post pictures once done!
 

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Use a relay and wire it into a keyed source. BigB and ElfNYC have been a ton of help to me on lighting issues. Maybe they will chime in.
Big B put a Badazz set of LED's on his bikes. Do a search for it.
 

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You can use a relay from under the hood of any newer car. They are all 4 prongs and can handle quite a bit. Of course a few 10 watt LEDs will need their own fuse.

For my bike (halogen) I am running a hot wire from the battery directly to a fuse, then to one pin on the relay in the NO position. The other side of the NO pin will go the positive of the lights. Then I'm taking the gnd side of the relay trigger and conecting it inside the headlight with the other gnd's. The positive side will come from the high beam wire that I'm going to professionally splice (no quick splice on headlights).
So when I'm running a regular beam I have one light (low beam) but when I click to high I have 3 lights. The added draw on the headlight fuse with this configuration is minimal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
So, with switches, do I really need a relay? I wasn't planning on tying into hi/lo beam, was planning on independent lights with their own switch.

Also, where is ground attachment point on Shadow?
 

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light will draw alot of power and you can be at risk of burning up the wiring
a relay prevents this from happening it basicly takes the load

u can get the power from anywhere u want !
front blinker running light
the brake running light
the headlight
whatever u want
the ground can go anywhere u want on the bike - any bolt attached to the frame can be a ground or the neg side of the battery
 

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For LED's, a relay is not really necessary unless you are tying into another circuit. They don't carry much load. You can attach the ground to any bolt that is attached to the metal frame, but nothing aluminum.

Why don't you want to connect power directly off the battery?
 

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For LED's, a relay is not really necessary unless you are tying into another circuit. They don't carry much load. You can attach the ground to any bolt that is attached to the metal frame, but nothing aluminum.

Why don't you want to connect power directly off the battery?
Normally I would agree with you but he's talking 30 watts in those LEDs

Here is the pinout for wiring to the high beam.

Circuit component Transistor Technology Electronic device Passive circuit component


If you want to wire one of these for a switch, hook the headlight wire to the switch. The power going to your switch would, then, come from a circuit tied to the positive side of the ignition switch.
 

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Normally I would agree with you but he's talking 30 watts in those LEDs

Here is the pinout for wiring to the high beam.

View attachment 3276

If you want to wire one of these for a switch, hook the headlight wire to the switch. The power going to your switch would, then, come from a circuit tied to the positive side of the ignition switch.
good point, to the op, can you post a link of the lights you have?
 

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So, if I want to have two lights on one switch (40-degree wide angle), and the other (15-degree driving light) on a different switch, then I am going to need two relays?
ok yeah, you'll need a relay for those. I thought you had accent led's. not led driving lights.
B,
If he will always have either/or "on"with the setup he's wanting, couldn't that be done with a 5 pin relay. I'm picturing if there is the possibility that he wants them on separate circuits AND separate from the headlights he needs a seperate relay. If he wants them on one switch (a new switch or his dimmer switch) then he could do that with one. If wants them separate, but with the same "trigger" then a 5-pin would do it. Am I confused?
 

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So, with switches, do I really need a relay? I wasn't planning on tying into hi/lo beam, was planning on independent lights with their own switch.

Also, where is ground attachment point on Shadow?
Do you want them on all the time? Using the switch to alternate between the three as in switch one way turns on one, switch the other way turns on the other two? Or will you have all three either running or all three off?
 

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LOL, so many questions, so little time. A 4 pin relay is all that's needed. Regardless of how he want's them to work. He can wire in his trigger to what ever source he wants, then install his separate switch in line to be able to manually turn them on and off.
 

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I will unlearn about the 87A. LOL. I keep trying to figure out a way to use it, and every time the way I come up with is more complicated than it needs to be. If you guys hear me mention 87A again just shoot me.
 
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