Honda Shadow Forums banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, everyone
I am new in this page. The winter is coming and I am not planning getting off my Motorcycle so I want to ask for some advice about how can I prepare it. I have been one year ridding but i have not been ridding in the winter so I want to know What can i do to maintain and prepare my Bike in a good condition to ride it during the winter . "I am not asking advice about how to prepare to garage the bike for the winter" . By the way my motorcycle is a Honda Shadow 750cc ACE 2002. I would appreciate your comments and your help. Thank you, Gracias!
 

· Registered
2009 VT750C2 Spirit, 2012 VT750C Aero, 2014 CB1100
Joined
·
70 Posts
How cold do you intend to ride?

I recommend not riding below freezing if at all possible. I did it in college back in New England many years ago, but it's a risky proposition.

Even if the roads appear dry, black ice is much more dangerous for motorcycles than for cars.

And then there's sand... If they sand the roads near you, the sand itself creates another serious hazard.

If they use salt too... "Fuggedaboutit!"
That stuff will literally dissolve your bike.

Most motorcycles aren't intended for riding in true winter conditions.

The Shadows, especially the carborated ones like your 2002, are generally "cold blooded" bikes that can be difficult to start when the temperatures drop.

Make sure you've got a temperature-appropriate coolant in the radiator, and let it warm up a little longer to get the oil flowing.

Cold can kill an otherwise good battery too. I've had trouble charging an AGM (gel battery) on a regular trickle charger.

If you use a battery tender, make sure it's the right kind for the battery in your bike (lesson I learned the hard way!)

Ideally you want the battery and/or the bike inside a heated space when you're not riding.

Even if you're not planning on letting the bike sit for a prolonged period, I still recommend a fuel stabilizer like Stabil... Just in case.

Also, try and keep the tank "topped up" Aka nearly full. Moisture can leech out of the air into the gasoline, so ideally you want to minimize periods where the bike is sitting with air in the tank.

Just like water condenses out of the air on a cold beverage in the warm summer air, water will condense inside your gas tank if there is too much air.

Seafoam can help displace moisture from the gasoline, so you might want to grab a can if that too.

Last but not least, not really maintenance, but you might want to stock up on chemical pocket warmers. Hunters and skiers use them.

When it was really cold, I used to put one in each glove, and have a third one inside my jacket. Typically they'd stay warm for about 8 hours... long enough to ride to campus, take my classes, and ride back.

But seriously, watch out for sand!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
503 Posts
Prepare it for winter? I put gas in the tank and ride it...:cool:

Seriously though, I do ride up until the morning temps consistently fall into the low 20's which is about January around my parts (eastern KY).
That is about the limit of my riding gear and my tolerance for getting cold.

When it's time to call it quits for the year I fill the tank with non-ethanol fuel, (that station for that is 20 miles away so it has plenty of time to get through the carbs), turn off the fuel petcock, plug the battery tender into the charging port, and throw a cover over it till about the middle of March when I start riding again.

If we have a warm day inbetween those two times, and there is no lingering salt on the road, I will take it out for a ride.
 
  • Like
Reactions: "Captain D"

· Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
How cold do you intend to ride?

I recommend not riding below freezing if at all possible. I did it in college back in New England many years ago, but it's a risky proposition.

Even if the roads appear dry, black ice is much more dangerous for motorcycles than for cars.

And then there's sand... If they sand the roads near you, the sand itself creates another serious hazard.

If they use salt too... "Fuggedaboutit!"
That stuff will literally dissolve your bike.

Most motorcycles aren't intended for riding in true winter conditions.

The Shadows, especially the carborated ones like your 2002, are generally "cold blooded" bikes that can be difficult to start when the temperatures drop.

Make sure you've got a temperature-appropriate coolant in the radiator, and let it warm up a little longer to get the oil flowing.

Cold can kill an otherwise good battery too. I've had trouble charging an AGM (gel battery) on a regular trickle charger.

If you use a battery tender, make sure it's the right kind for the battery in your bike (lesson I learned the hard way!)

Ideally you want the battery and/or the bike inside a heated space when you're not riding.

Even if you're not planning on letting the bike sit for a prolonged period, I still recommend a fuel stabilizer like Stabil... Just in case.

Also, try and keep the tank "topped up" Aka nearly full. Moisture can leech out of the air into the gasoline, so ideally you want to minimize periods where the bike is sitting with air in the tank.

Just like water condenses out of the air on a cold beverage in the warm summer air, water will condense inside your gas tank if there is too much air.

Seafoam can help displace moisture from the gasoline, so you might want to grab a can if that too.

Last but not least, not really maintenance, but you might want to stock up on chemical pocket warmers. Hunters and skiers use them.

When it was really cold, I used to put one in each glove, and have a third one inside my jacket. Typically they'd stay warm for about 8 hours... long enough to ride to campus, take my classes, and ride back.

But seriously, watch out for sand!
JayFreddy, thank you my friend for the advices!
I am living in Korea now and the winter here is between 5c and -7c, depends on the day. What do you think about that?
and yes, here they use salt !
 

· Registered
2013 Honda Shadow Phantom 750
Joined
·
4,660 Posts
Keep gas in the tank, keep an eye on tire pressures and tread, and you might want to keep a battery tender connected to the battery when not riding to keep the cold from getting to the battery.

Ride on,,,


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

· Registered
2009 VT750C2 Spirit, 2012 VT750C Aero, 2014 CB1100
Joined
·
70 Posts
JayFreddy, thank you my friend for the advices!
I am living in Korea now and the winter here is between 5c and -7c, depends on the day. What do you think about that?
and yes, here they use salt !
I would be wary of the salt and any temperatures below freezing.

If you're in Korea, I'm guessing that your bike lives outside, or at best, in unheated parking. A battery tender is probably a wise investment, but make sure you get the proper type for your battery type.

Otherwise figure out how to remove the battery from the bike and bring it in at night. Kind of a pain, but better than having to buy a new battery.

Do you have access to a friendly motorcycle shop? That's always a good thing, regardless of country, but it's not always possible. They should be able to suggest local products to stabilize your gas, keep the coolant from freezing, inhibit water in the gas, and to keep the carbs clean.

If you do ride on salted roads, make sure you rinse or wipe that stuff off your bike every day when you get home...

Stay warm and ride safely!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
I personally ride until the salt trucks come out. I take the battery out and trickle it as well as run fuel stabilizer.
In order for it to actually work it needs to thoroughly mix with the gas. I get a 5 gallon can, pour a liberal amount in and fill it with gas then shake it up, put it in the bike, usually Nearly empty tank and go for a decent ride. If you have a petcock you can run the bike, switch it off and let it starve itself. I’ve had a Chineseum carburetor last 12 years so far doing that.
 

· Registered
1999 Shadow 750 ACE VT750CD3 Modified
Joined
·
4,951 Posts
I would never ride my 750 ACE when there is salt on the road and I live in salt country.
FWIW rust perforation is the big killer of cars in my neck of the woods too, but I have to get around and I don't want to sacrifice my bikes.
I have seen a couple of examples, when looking for used Honda parts, which are in reasonable shape other than the frame is rusted through behind the engine at the swing arm.
They were probably fixable, but it wasn't worth it so they were recycled.

Then below freezing you get into ice and slush on the road, which even if you have suitable tires is a nasty ride which can dump you off quickly.
As a kid I rode a dirt bike all year round and we have 4 months of Winter, so I have some experience, I can't recommend it, and definitely not on a 500+ pound bike.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top