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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
who else has the harbor freight tire changer?--im thinking bout getting one---do they work well and what are the tricks? do i really need the motorcycle wheel attachment

http://www.harborfreight.com/automot...-changers.html

looks like they no longer sell them---anyone know where i can get one for around the 50 bucks price?----all other ones like it that i find are bout 90 bucks, plus another 60 for the motorcycle wheel attachment---but once again i suck at googling

what other methods can i get this done on my own

thanks in advance
 

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I have one w/ the motorcycle wheel attachment. You need that to clamp down the rim to the machine. Works great. Well worth the investment. Mine paid for itself after a couple tire changes. It's expensive around here to have done.

Yeah, I think they stopped selling it for some reason.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
dang that sucks----i found one just like it on ebay with the motorcycle attachment for like $160----i was hoping maybe it would work without that attachment---and then i was seeing posts about you need some plastic blocks to put on the 3 rim clamps of the attachment so you dont screw up the rim.
 

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Keep your money and invest it in some good quality tire irons. I have the HF tire changer and the only part of it that I find usefull is the bead breaker. I still find it easier to change them on the bench.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
ok thunderglass that sounds good to me too--ive got a way to break beads, so thats no problem--its just the tire removal and install that im trying to accomplish for cheap--what tire irons or spoons should i buy to make it easy????--i see harbor freight has those as well ---any input would be much appreciated
 

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HF Tools are of very questionable quality.

Speaking from experience, and research from the interwebs.

If they break and your warranty is up. gl finding parts.

not saying its all bad, but they arent in the tool manufacturing business, so quality is inconsistent and based solely on wherever the heck they bought their tools this month.
 

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ok thunderglass that sounds good to me too--ive got a way to break beads, so thats no problem--its just the tire removal and install that im trying to accomplish for cheap--what tire irons or spoons should i buy to make it easy????--i see harbor freight has those as well ---any input would be much appreciated
My advice: With MC tires, longer spoons are not always better. Be careful of marring your rims as well, so look for spoons that have flat faces and rounded edges. I have the long one from HF and I never use it on my MC tires because it mars aluminum rims badly. Also, go to NAPA and get a gallon of tire change lube. Soapy water will work (poorly); the real stuff is cheap, a gallon lasts forever, and is TONS better at its job. My NAPA had it right on the shelf.

Also, you are gonna want a very short stem valve wrench. I use the wrench caps, you know the schrader valve caps that have a valve wrench built in. It also helps to seat the bead if you have a clamp-on style tire chuck for your air compressor that will fill the tire without the valve core installed (it flows way more air, faster). I made/modified my own, but I know you can buy them.
 

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I have one w/ the motorcycle wheel attachment. You need that to clamp down the rim to the machine. Works great. Well worth the investment. Mine paid for itself after a couple tire changes. It's expensive around here to have done.

Yeah, I think they stopped selling it for some reason.
Same experience here - the first couple of changes were experimental and not much fun - well removing a tire is a piece of cake - (and extra set of hands eases the installation process considerably). I love mine - I have the mojo lever and nylon blocks (that cost almost as much as the changer). Well worth the investment if you ride a lot and live in the Washington DC area.

Put an ad on Craigslist - you may luck into a used one.
 

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You don’t need a fancy ($) machine, although I’m sure it’s handy. Here is really REALLY good guide on “do it yourself”. Including making your own work mount and bead breaker (on the DIY). Hardest part is holding everything still while you’re wrestling the tire around trying to get it on and off, so a good work mount is a must! As stated above, unless you plan on changing 20 tires a month, save your money and invest it in good spoons & irons and you'll thank yourself.

http://www.clarity.net/~adam/tire-changing.html
 

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Silly peeps...
I used two (2) tire irons, two homemade rubber rim protectors (pieces of reenforced heater hose) and a large C-clamp for a bead breaker. I can change a tire with my eyes closed (I'll even bet money on that statement)
It's not rocket science, just years of experience. You don't really need any fancy tools like some may recommend.
 

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Same experience here - the first couple of changes were experimental and not much fun - well removing a tire is a piece of cake - (and extra set of hands eases the installation process considerably). I love mine - I have the mojo lever and nylon blocks (that cost almost as much as the changer). Well worth the investment if you ride a lot and live in the Washington DC area.

Put an ad on Craigslist - you may luck into a used one.
I have them as well, agree, great investment.
 

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tired but true story

Ha ha ha ha; I really like that high tech bead breaker. I wish you the best of luck in changing your tires. I just had the local Honda shop do my front and they charged $32, but once upon a time I did this routinely, and found spray silicone handy along with the good tire irons mentioned above.

I got really good at changing tires. Many years ago in my single days I volunteered to change the front tire for a very attractive biker woman who I met just cruising around the Wisconsin backroads. As it turns out she was a Playboy club bunny and was working on her doctorate at the University. That combination of brains and beauty was deadly. A few days later I changed that tire right there in her laboratory. Not long after that she said she would let me buy her a drink, and to this day I can not forget the drink order: A shot and a beer, several times. She could out drink me as well. I still remember the adrenaline rush the next morning when I heard a noise downstairs and she said go out the window, that's my jealous boyfriend...
tire changing can be fun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
thanks custom85vt for that link and painterD --ive got a bead breaker and wheel balancer at work--i think i will try the spoon method with some rim protectors

What do you guys use for rim protectors? i saw a post where just some pieces of garden hose would work, but is there something that would work better? that heater hose sounds good too

Any ideas on how to build or buy something to hold the darn thing still in place while im wraslin' the tire on and off.

thanks for all the great replies--i will get it done thanks to yall

**** crazy story bikenut--made me laugh all the way to Harbor Freight
 

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Any ideas on how to build or buy something to hold the darn thing still in place while im wraslin' the tire on and off.
In the link above there is a plan (in step one) for using a car rim, which you could in turn mount wherever you have a really sturdy place (bench?). Thats what I used, really helped. There are also DIY rim protector plans in step three. I forgot what I used, but I am sure it was just some POS I had lying around.
 

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My own experience with the HF changer was mixed. I broke the bead using the 2X6 wedged under the truck bumper approach. I had a hard time trying to remove the tire with irons but I recognize now that I should have had the wheel solidly secured to something.

I ended up using the no-mar bar and cut up pieces of a laundry detergent bottle as rim protectors on the changer. I had to strap the wheel down to the changer to keep it from moving. It worked for me but was a lot of trial and error. Of course some of that may be because it was my first time.

One comment about the laundry bottle protectors, when using them with tire irons, the irons would simply mash them into oblivion and I ended up screwing up the rim paint in several places. Once I got the tire off, I sanded, primed and repainted the damaged areas with Rustoleum Satin Black rattle can. That also afforded me the opportunity to clean up some corrosion I found inside the rim. It was a week or two after painting before I reassembled the tire and had no difficulty or further damage using the no-mar bar for the install.

+1 on the proper lubricant, it helped a lot
+1 on a solid mounting whether you are using a changer loike the HF or simply using irons manually

I also had a hard time finding black colored weights to match my wheel when I was balancing the assembly. Eventually found them but took some effort.

I used a ratcheting strap around the center of the tire when I was remounting and filling. That helped force the bead against the rim so it would hold air. I partially filled it, then when it was clearly holding air, I removed the strap and finished airing up until the bead popped into place on both sides

HTH
 

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That No-Mar stuff is very pricey. This design is actually what I patterned my tire changing rig after. A little square tubing, some hardware. Weld it together and BAM! $600 tire rig for about $50. Works on car tires, truck tires, sand rail tires, motorcycle tires, maybe not tractor tires though.
 
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