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It's an 1985 VT750 and I need help determining where this leak is coming from lol. I think it's coming from the hardline where the it enters the engine block. Is that a seal or something?
In my opinion metric cruisers of this era are just nothing but problems. Never again.

You bought a 35 year old bike? Then you wanna trash-talk it, the brand, and people on this forum because it's a 35 year old bike? uhh... okayyy...

Just for future reference, you might consider looking more closely at an older bike to determine if it was taken care of properly before buying it? Old bikes have "tells" that experienced wrenchin' riders know to look for.

Also for future reference, the 2002 Spirit VT750DC in the sig has 32,000 miles on it... my 2010 FURY has just under 65,000 miles on it... and aside from performance mods, aesthetic mods and regular maintenance... no problems with either of them. If Honda is notorious for anything it's "low maintenance, high reliability" ... just for future reference, ya know?
 

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84 VT500C retro bobber
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I couldnt imagine throwing in the towel on something Ive invested thousands into. Its not my bike nor my life so I wont lecture of condemn I'm just saying that Ive fixed far worse that Ive invested less in just because Ill be damned if Im going to let a pile of metal beat me.
 

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I couldnt imagine throwing in the towel on something Ive invested thousands into. Its not my bike nor my life so I wont lecture of condemn I'm just saying that Ive fixed far worse that Ive invested less in just because Ill be damned if Im going to let a pile of metal beat me.
...it's all just nuts & bolts
 

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06' VT1100C99' GL1500C Valkyrie
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Let's be honest folk's, most of our tech advice has been on the older VT 500, 700, and 750's. Honda must got lucky with the 1100 w/o too much reengineering. I've seen only 2 VT500 Ascot's and they had the same problem, blown head gaskets. As far as the VT 700 & early 750, I can't actually remember them as I was into life raising kid's (5 boys) that couldn't afford looking at new models so I was servicing older stock and that being a CL350, Yamaha 360XS,GL850 Suzuki, and CB400F. Looks like I missed that chapter of the Honda line. Basically you have to be on your game to bring any old ride back to life and having OEM service manual. I've been lucky as to have only two POS bikes out of 17 I've owned and they were both 2 stroke's which was me being young not having patience/$$$/knowledge to revive them. Having all the tool's in the world isn't going to solve the lack of understanding. I've been there done that but I've alway's worked it out in the end. And beer was never involved! ;) (unless I WAS HELPING ON A HARLEY) :LOL:
 
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2015 Shadow Aero, 1972 Triumph 650 Tiger
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I really learned my lesson doing a rolling restoration on my 72 triumph. It was 44 years old when I first received it. Never NEVER again! I wanna' ride and don't wanna' repair as it were.
 

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OK Num nutz @RideHarder, first just because you bought a 35 year old bike is no excuse to bash everything. I have an '85 VT700 and yes it had been sitting for the last 15+ years, guess what I went into it knowing there were going to be issues. I have done a full frame off rebuild and I have no worries that it will last for many years to come. Are the parts hard to find? Yes duh! So you have to find ways to fix things, but it is doable, it just takes time and the want to do something the right way. A 35 year old bike is not fixed in a day or two, I have been working on mine since last August almost a full year! But I will have one hell of a bike in the next week or so. (Finally on the reassembly part!) So embrace the suck and get over it, if you wanted a turn key bike you should have bought one that was only a year or 2 old or bought a new one. A 35 year old bike is not a turn key bike most times.
 

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84 VT500C retro bobber
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Also keep in mind that the early vt's were hondas first venture into the cruiser market. The engines were brand new designs and there is a definite learning curve in manufacturing. That said, my 84 vt500 had been well abused, sat for many years and has been down at least once and I have less invested in it than some people spend on a helmet. They can be great bikes but parts are harder to source and age and mechanics hadly ever do each other any favors.
 

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OK, looked up this bike " '85 VT750" at BikeBandit and only found a VT700 listed for '85.
I went with the 700 because the parts layout matched the OP's pic.
That tube in question has a rubber seal that still available for $4, so there's that.

I would think one could remove the clamp from the tube, creating some room between the case and the tube, pull the tube out from motor pivoting/rotating it on the seal to break it loose, twist it back and/or niggle/wiggle that tube down/out of the cylinder, without removing that cylinder.
Something I'd try if I owned it.
I'd try a lot of stuff up to Fubar before I'd give up too...
but hey, jmo,
:D
 

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@Kenstone the coolant lines are not hard to get out, with the cylinder still attached to the engine and even with the engine still in the frame. As for him having to pull the engine to remove the water pump, that can also be taken out with the engine still in the frame. All I can think is that they just say to pull the engine for room to work?

Also in '85 they only made the VT750 in Canada, in the US there were tariffs on anything over 700cc. So Honda brought the bore size in a few cc and labeled it a 700 and called it a day. So in the U.S. you will only find VT700C. And stay away from the California edition. Trust me California F**ked it up with even more emissions restrictions.
 
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