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Hi:
According to the literature I have, Ohio uses the ALT-MOST (Alternate Motorcycle Operator Skills Test) which is the same test used in Indiana. Ohio may have modified the test, but this is the basic info.

The ALT-MOST has seven specific skill tests. A tight left hand turn. Normal stop in a rectangle. Cone weave. Right hand U-Turn. Quick stop. Swerve. The quick stop and swerve are timed tests and you must be going between 12-20 mph when doing those tests.

You lose points for riding outside lines, putting your foot down during exercises, stalling the bike and typically it is an auto fail if you drop the bike.

The riding exam isn't a gimme. In Indiana about 20% of the riders fail it on the first attempt and about 10% of the riders fail to pass repeated attempts. From experience I'd add that about 30% of riders who do pass do so with a significant number of deductions on the test and perhaps only 1 rider in 20 rides the test clean. Also from experience about 1-2 riders out of 40 will drop their bikes during the test.

If you do a search here on ALT-Most I posted a detailed overview of the test and there is also an outline of it with diagrams of the test at
http://www.webbikeworld.com/motorcycle-training/motorcycle-test/ The last link goes into the most detail.

As an FYI, the reason I know this stuff is because I'm a contract license examiner for Indiana. I work for ABATE which has the contract to administer the license exams for IN-DMV. Last year I tested some 200 riders.
 

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Regarding the actual question. The DMV in your state can answer that question. Here in Indiana you may repeat the test once immediately the same day and it is included in your initial testing fee; $10 here. The catch is you are allowed, here at least to only test 3 times on a single learners permit. The permits are issued for 1 year, so you get three shots at it and officially if you fail 3 times you must wait a year, retake the written to get a new learners permit and then you get three more shots at it.

The two holes in the system in Indiana and quite a few other states is that a rider may have learners permits issued over and over again. I've argued as have some others that by definition a person who fails the test isn't deemed capable of safely riding a bike on the streets but the loophole allows them to do so indefinately, granted with some restrictions. Failing the test 3 times does not invalidate the learners permit here.

The second loophole that I've seen some folks do is this. Here when you fail the test, the examiner notes that on the learners permit. It is also recorded on the records that go to the DMV. As it turns out though, the fact that a person has failed the test 1-3 times is not centrally recorded. So what some riders have done is to go to the DMV state they lost their learners permit, get a fresh one issued which allows them to retest since the examiners will look at the back of the permit which is clean.

I cannot say if falsely claiming to have lost a license is illegal I can only say I've seen a couple of folks do it and at my level there isn't much I can do about it.
 

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I can tell you what the arguement for it is. The U-Turn is supposed to simulate the width of a residential street so you are demomstrating the ability to turn around; that's the stated logic. Stopping in a box is a bit silly as well but it shows you can stop the bike where you want it to stop.

My personal opinion is that a more valid test would be an extensive on street test. The reality of the situation though is that such a test would be expensive and probably difficult to administer. As it is we have people complain about paying a $10 fee for the ALT-Most Test.

MSF who developed the ALT-MOST say that they have pretty good evidence that people who can pass the test do pretty well on the streets and I have no reason to doubt their claim since you do have to be fairly comfortable with your bike to pass it. Critics on the other hand claim it proves nothing other than a person can ride tight manuevers in a parking lot. Of course the same can be said of the BRC/ERC classes.

Strictly anncedotal is my own experience in watching folks is that someone who can handle a bike well during the test knows how to ride a bike. Now does the test look at judgement and street smarts, no but that puts us back to onstreet tests.

Understand I'm not defending the test, simply stating what it is. In a perfect worl we'd probably have a system similar to how pilots are trained and tested, but then I also imagine there would be a whole lot fewer riders and drivers out there.
 
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