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Discussion Starter #1
My 85 VT700C has air-assisted forks. The manual calls for 0-6 PSI. Trouble is despite having a half dozen tire gauges (a couple really nice) nothing can take an accurate reading at that low a pressure. I bought a small hand pump w/ a built in gauge on it but it goes from 0-20 in the space of 1/8 inch. Even my best gauge goes from 0-5 in one mark, then 5-10 in 2 pound increments.

Never owned a digital gauge. Do they take accurate reading for 0-6 (the low end ones, not the big $ ones)? Any other budget solutions?
 

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You answered your own question. Digital gauge. You can find one under $10 these days. That's what I ended up using on My 82 Magna.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
You answered your own question.
Thanks but... that was a two part question. From what I am reading your average 10$ DG will not read low pressure.


The Accutire Standard Digital Tire Gauge measures air pressure from 5 to 150 PSI
Michelin Pistol Grip Gauge is designed to measure air pressure from 5 to 99 PSI
 

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I have a "slider Type" gauge that reads that low...
I read 8 on one tire, another of my equipment requires 12, it reads these well...
There are good gauges out there, BUT I betchya they will be OLD stock, nothing from CHINA...
 

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Save your money....Just let your ears be your guide. Release a little air from the fork and listen. Compare it to a bare-assed fart. For a reference: A "Sneaky Pete" is about 1-3 Lbs., and a full blown "Flutterblast" is between 4-44 lbs.
I hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
ATV tires are made for low pressure (about 3 to 4 psi).
Thanks for that, did not know that. Seems like a good tip. Seems “Slime” makes a good low pressure dail gauge (0-20 for ATVs), might even be able to find one locally.
 

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It is also possible to "link" both sides of the fork. 1/4" or 3/8's air hose, a tee, and a couple of fittings is all it takes. On every bike I have owned with air forks, including my current Venture, I have gone to aftermarket springs/heavier oil and I run ZERO air.

Keep in mind that in any fork/shock air acts as both an preload adjustment and an progressive spring whether the component has a way to put more air into it or not.

The more you compress air the greater its resistance to that compression.....Tah Dah, this is equal to a progressively wound spring. Want more preload on your suspension to carry a greater load, just add a few more pound of air and that is exactly what you get.

Extra air pumped into your fork will not and can not change the damping/rebound characteristics of the fork.

edit......and don't let "your ears be your guide". It is vitally important to the handling ability of your bike that both side of the fork be as equal as possible.
 

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When I bought my 82 Magna the PO had about 10-12psi it the forks and I didn't have an owners manual or maintenance manual. By the time I got one, one of my forks blew. I rebuilt it and found out it only was supposed to have 2-4psi in the forks. I don't know the brand of the digital guage I had but it did read low pressure fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
edit......and don't let "your ears be your guide". It is vitally important to the handling ability of your bike that both side of the fork be as equal as possible.
Yes...I...wouldn’t have done that in a million years with a gun pointed at my head. Simply as I realize the two need to be even, plus when dealing with low pressure letting the air out...LETS THE AIR OUT!

But I do appreciate any advise given. :-D
 

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I just changed my fork oil on my 83 750 to 15w and didn't add any air. I have not noticed a difference in the handling between the original oil w/air and the new oil. I’ve read a few opinions out there that mentioned adding air causes the fork seals to fail sooner. I don’t know if that’s true or not.
 

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Save your money....Just let your ears be your guide. Release a little air from the fork and listen. Compare it to a bare-assed fart. For a reference: A "Sneaky Pete" is about 1-3 Lbs., and a full blown "Flutterblast" is between 4-44 lbs.
I hope this helps.
And what kind of pressure gauge did you have to measure that and where is the schrader valve? If we ever meet, remind me to NOT borrow your gauge...;)
 
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