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I am trying to install a new tire on a spoked rim,, are there any tricks... can it be done with tire spoons,, or am i just waisting my time trying at home.
It is a 10" rim.
I try to keep the bead in the center of the rim where it is already on..
270 degrees of the bead is on.. but I can't get that last 90deg on..

If it was a car tire.. I would hold the tire bead to the center of the rim.. and hit the exposed bead with a hammer until it pops on.

plenty of soap.. well placed foot and tap it with a hammer.... POP.
 

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Basically, it is the same procedure. Plenty of soapy water and work the tire around the rim. Use the spoons if you need to pry on it. Two spoons works best so you can hold the position with one (to keep the tire from coming back off) and work on a new spot with the other.
 

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I was a bicycle mechanic . . . I thought "Hey big bicycle wheels, no problem, pop them off, pop them on."

I did this once. Once was enough. Use lots of soap and keep the children away unless you want to greatly expand their vocabulary. I changed the rim strip that covers the back of the spoke nipples, and used a new tube. No point in going through this much trouble without changing everything. Watch that tube, it can get pinched between the tire, rim, and tool. Once was enough, now I take my wheels to the local shop. They install tires purchased at their shop, wheels off the bike while I wait for about $5/tire, balanced.

Good luck,
david
 

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Google No-Mar.

In the videos section you can see the simplified methods "using thier machine" but the tips themselves are helpful.

For about $110 you can get the manual tire changer with motorcycle kit (simular to the no-mar). If you go this route remember to dip the ends in a hard epoxy and sand it smoothsmooth before use for rim protection.

Around here the shops quoted me $35 per tire for the mount and balance.

$70 ea time i need to change tires or $110 for the rest of my riding life? $110 wins.

You can build a balancer out of some 2x4's, a peice of rob and rubber stoppers.

There are also some videos found through google were they used a 14" car rim to build a changing base.
 
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Changing motorcycle tires with tire irons is not easy. If you've never done it you will likely do some damage. If someone could show you, you could accomplish it.

You need to protect the rim with pieces of plastic or leather. You need to squeeze the bead together opposite where you're working and keep it very close to the center of the wheel. If you can warm up the rubber of the tire with a space heater or something that will make the rubber a bit more flexible. Put some baby powder on the tube and some soapy water on the bead of the tire.

It's not an easy process and there is very little margin of error. I would recommend taking your wheel to a shop and let them do it. If they screw up your wheel, they'll buy you a new one. NTB just bought me two new wheels for my van :lol:
 

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I usually change my own tires, with the spoke rims on the Spirit. The cast rims on my Valk I might just let a shop do.

That said, I think one main thing is to have a system of holding the rim/tire assembly securely while you work on it. A minimum of two tire irons, better to have three, is necessary. Either soapy water, or the special tire lube made for the purpose. It does take a little effort, and getting the tube back in is a pain in the backside.

Entirely doable if you want to save a few dollars, or if you are ever in the position where you NEED to do it yourself.

Yall ride safe...
TJ
 

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I changed the rear tire on a Honda Hawk I had when I was 16 myself.. actually, the tire was fine, I was just changing the tube. It wasn't all that hard, had a friend who sold me the tubes at cost, and warned me that it's EASY to pinch the tube and ruin it. I was VERY careful, and guess what, he was right. Notice I said he sold me TUBES at cost... it took me 3 trys.
 

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I've changed tires on all my bikes, no problem. Rim protectors are a must with most rims to keep from scratching them with the tire tools. You can buy rim protectors or make them as I did. I use 6" peices of radiator hose (with the re-enforcement impregnated into the rubber) and I slit the length of the hose to slip over the edge of the rim to keep the tools from scratching the rim. I poked holes in each one and attached a short nylon cord to be able to pull them out of the tire incase it slips inside whole mounting it on the rim.
My tire tools are 2' long with rounded ends to keep from poking the tire (or tube if you have them)

Breaking the bead is the same as a car tire, which I use my homemade bead breaker that has a 4' lever so it's pretty easy to use.

I've watched enough mechanics change tires during my younger years, so the first time I needed it done, I did it myself. I don't see what's so hard about it.
Motorcycle tires are alot stiffer than car tires, so you just need to use more elbow grease is all.
Always keep spare valve stems and tire lube in the shop just incase.

Tire machines are for pussies. It's all about technique, not so hard once you've done a few.
 

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I am trying to install a new tire on a spoked rim,, are there any tricks... can it be done with tire spoons,, or am i just waisting my time trying at home.
It is a 10" rim.
I try to keep the bead in the center of the rim where it is already on..
270 degrees of the bead is on.. but I can't get that last 90deg on..

If it was a car tire.. I would hold the tire bead to the center of the rim.. and hit the exposed bead with a hammer until it pops on.

plenty of soap.. well placed foot and tap it with a hammer.... POP.
I would bring it to a shop and have it done... but if you are one of those DIYers that love the challenge... the dual sport guys know this stuff cold (because they have to)... and these guys seem to know more than most:

BestRest Products, LLC - BeadBrakR
 

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There's another thread just started on this here. Lots of good info.

I've done lots (literally hundreds) of car tires with a couple of irons and a bead breaker. Bike tires are more difficult. Wire wheels are worse. I'd want a tire changer rig -- and so I got one. It paid for itself quickly since the best price I found from any shop near here was $75/tire if I didn't buy the tire from them. ($50/tire if I did -- but couldn't get the ME880s I wanted.)
 
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