Honda Shadow Forums banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
517 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
This is my first bike. I'm concerned about getting a flat since I've had my share of them on bicycles. I know they are not the same but I do not anticipate that if I were to get a flat, I could fix it on the spot.

I would like to hear your experiences, suggestions, prevention, and so on.
Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,811 Posts
You're bike has got spoked rims, which means inner tubes. You get a flat, you're likely screwed. Buy insurance with towing and keep a cell phone with you.

There are many liquid sealants on the market, but it's been my experience that when you get a hole in a tube it's all over, unless you're prepared to change out or patch a tube on the road.

That's just the way it is. Try not to run over anything.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,023 Posts
I keep a 12 volt air compressor in my saddle bag and a clip on cigarette lighter adapter that clips right onto the battery and then the air compressor plugs into it, I found my compressor in the bicycle isle at a store that I shop at.

It would work for slow leaks to get you a certain distance before you had to stop and fill up the tire again, but a large hole it would not be any good for.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
It happened to me, picked up a roofing nail on a ride with 6 others, I was the 2nd to the last guy in the pack and I was the lucky one to get the nail. Brand new tires too, I just got them this year. Arg! Spokes, so it's a tube. Tried fix-a-flat, no luck and there was no way to break that tire down on the side of the road. I ended up calling "roadside assistance" (my wife) God Bless her, she drove two hours to come pick me up in the Truck. (that was a fun ride home) One of my buddies stayed behind to help me load and followed us home, the rest finished the ride. Nothings better than a great wife and a good friend. The following Monday my wife called and added roadside assistance. We got it through our cell phone company.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,270 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,795 Posts
I have spoke wheels on my 1940 Ford coupe and they are sealed with some type of goop, I always wondered why the don't do that with motorcycle wheels. The next time I have a flat I'm going to try it. Hopefully not too soon though.
Tried the goop "Green Slime", "Berrymans", don't waste your money, they don't work on bikes. It says it will on the label but don't believe it, and it makes a **** of a mess inside your rim. If you do try this product, be prepared for future rust inside your rim. And here's the great part, the resulting rust to add insult to injury will abraid your new tube and guess what happens then?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,278 Posts
I found this several years ago on the darkside forum for sealing tires. Seems more work but a better to me sealing job.

**r you pull the tire off the rim, you all know that is the first step
Pull the rubber band out, and look for some rust areas, I had three spots that had some rust on it, I have a little sandblaster so I sandblasted just the rust spots and put some good primer on it. I let it dry and then I used some brake clean to clean all oils off the rim were I was going to put the sealer. Then I used a little sand paper and scuff up the chrome, just a little, the 5200 that I used probley would stick anyway. Then I blew it down with air. I went to a bike shop and got a tubeless valve stem, the one I got has a 45 degree angle, you can use a straight one, and I had to drill out the valve stem hole a little, after you put it in, you put a piece of tape over it. I cut a piece of cardboard pattern for the inside of the rim, then used the cardboard, and transferred it to a piece of plastic, this is to keep the same depth all the way around the rim. Then I started to putting the 5200 on the rim using the plastic putty knife to spread the 5200 around the rim. I wanted to get it even, because of tire balancing, I had to wait about 60 hrs for this stuff to cure, because it was so thick, it was about 3/16 thick, just enough to cover the spoke nuts. I am going to do the front rim, but when I do it Im going to use two coats next time, because of the curing, I believe it will cure better that way. This 5200 is like rubber when it cures. Ship yard use it for under water sealant.
It is made by 3M Marine adhesive sealant 5200. It is spendy stuff, but it is good stuff. Retail is about $20 for a 10oz tube, I had a friend that owed me, that has a RV shop and that is how I got mine, for free . I think you can find it on line for about 10 or 12 bucks. You have to be carefully, you don’t want to get this where it don’t belong, it is hard to get off. It took less than one tube to do the rear rim, once you open the tube it will not keep, You have plenty of working time so you need to take you time and don’t get in a hurry, and make sure it is cured before you mount your tire. You have to be careful when mounting tire, not to damage it, it is tuff stuff. Also this stuff you can patch. And don’t forget to remove the tape over the valve stem hole before you mount the tire.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
517 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I appreciate all the responses. I have Progressive ins.
I added roadside assistance with trip interruption hoping I will never have to use it but just in case, $15 bucks a year is worth it.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,795 Posts
I found this several years ago on the darkside forum for sealing tires. Seems more work but a better to me sealing job.

**r you pull the tire off the rim, you all know that is the first step
Pull the rubber band out, and look for some rust areas, I had three spots that had some rust on it, I have a little sandblaster so I sandblasted just the rust spots and put some good primer on it. I let it dry and then I used some brake clean to clean all oils off the rim were I was going to put the sealer. Then I used a little sand paper and scuff up the chrome, just a little, the 5200 that I used probley would stick anyway. Then I blew it down with air. I went to a bike shop and got a tubeless valve stem, the one I got has a 45 degree angle, you can use a straight one, and I had to drill out the valve stem hole a little, after you put it in, you put a piece of tape over it. I cut a piece of cardboard pattern for the inside of the rim, then used the cardboard, and transferred it to a piece of plastic, this is to keep the same depth all the way around the rim. Then I started to putting the 5200 on the rim using the plastic putty knife to spread the 5200 around the rim. I wanted to get it even, because of tire balancing, I had to wait about 60 hrs for this stuff to cure, because it was so thick, it was about 3/16 thick, just enough to cover the spoke nuts. I am going to do the front rim, but when I do it Im going to use two coats next time, because of the curing, I believe it will cure better that way. This 5200 is like rubber when it cures. Ship yard use it for under water sealant.
It is made by 3M Marine adhesive sealant 5200. It is spendy stuff, but it is good stuff. Retail is about $20 for a 10oz tube, I had a friend that owed me, that has a RV shop and that is how I got mine, for free . I think you can find it on line for about 10 or 12 bucks. You have to be carefully, you don’t want to get this where it don’t belong, it is hard to get off. It took less than one tube to do the rear rim, once you open the tube it will not keep, You have plenty of working time so you need to take you time and don’t get in a hurry, and make sure it is cured before you mount your tire. You have to be careful when mounting tire, not to damage it, it is tuff stuff. Also this stuff you can patch. And don’t forget to remove the tape over the valve stem hole before you mount the tire.
Looked into doing this myself but truing the spokes later becomes problematic. Try placing one of those sticky paper dots over each spoke nut beforehand and this should in theory allow turning the spokes without disturbing the sealant.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
234 Posts
I have been giving a lot of thought to flats as ell, but I dont have spoke wheels. Are the tire plug kits for bikes worth the bucks or just a waste of time? It looked like a simple way to get the bike to a tire shop just plug the hole and use the CO2 to reinflate. Not sure if anyone has tried this stuff and how it effects the balance or handling on the bike.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top