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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am down to the last step in getting my 1985 vt700 road ready. I need to replace my front brake pads. I do brake jobs on my car all the time so there should not be to hard. I ordered my repair manual and it has not shipped yet so if someone could give me a quick breakdown on the task. My biggest question is if I just replace the pads should I have to bleed them?
 

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Replacing the pads is just like doing it on the car. Remove the caliper, remove the old pads, collapse the piston, install new pads, install the caliper, pump the brakes to seat the pads/piston. No need to bleed unless you open the system.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
my uncle thinks he a god motorcycle mechanic and he says i got to open the res cap to let the fluid overflow when I press the pistons in the caliper. So if I do that will i have to bleed them. Another thing is that I have not checked the condition that the fluid is in! Most of the time in these older bikes the stuff is nasty looking. So if I need to replace fluid how hard is it to bleed them?
 

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my uncle thinks he a god motorcycle mechanic and he says i got to open the res cap to let the fluid overflow when I press the pistons in the caliper. So if I do that will i have to bleed them. Another thing is that I have not checked the condition that the fluid is in! Most of the time in these older bikes the stuff is nasty looking. So if I need to replace fluid how hard is it to bleed them?
My son and I replaced the brake lines on my ride... we completely flushed the reservoir and the lines. It's not "hard," per se... it just takes time. One person on the brake handle compressing, just like bleeding brakes on a car, the other person manning the wrench on the bleeder valve. Check your manual, on my ride ya can't compress the brake lever all the way, you have to put a block in. It's a good idea to flush the system on the older bikes, especially if the fluid looks anything other than clear in the reservoir window. It's a good maintenance practice and if you haven't flushed your lines, you probably should think about it. But it's not hard... Put on the music, make sure you've got smokes, crack a beer and get to it... no big deal :)
 

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my uncle thinks he a god motorcycle mechanic and he says i got to open the res cap to let the fluid overflow when I press the pistons in the caliper. So if I do that will i have to bleed them. Another thing is that I have not checked the condition that the fluid is in! Most of the time in these older bikes the stuff is nasty looking. So if I need to replace fluid how hard is it to bleed them?
Not true. Unless fluid has been added, there will be room in the reseviour for the fluid as you compress the piston. Even if you did, it would not let air in. It would be just like taking the master cylinder cap off a car.

Now, it may be a good idea to flush the fluid if it's very old. Not a big deal to do either.

One of these will make the brake bleeding easier
Amazon.com: Mityvac MV8000 Automotive Tune Up and Brake Bleeding Kit: Automotive
 

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WARNING WARNING WARNING

Do NOT let brake fluid spill or splash on to ANY painted surface. Brake fluid will eat/stain paint very quickly. If you do spill any on your paint rinse it off with water immediately and then wipe off with a soft cloth.
 

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If your brake or clutch fluid is more than 2 years old it should be flushed and changed, anyway. Otherwise the process is exactly like on a car, for the front, at least. Brake fluid changing recommendation applies to your car also.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Im still waiting for my for my repair manual to come so would anyone know how far I can press my brake lever in when bleeding out my brakes? Maybe put put a block in @ half way to be safe?
 

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Im still waiting for my for my repair manual to come so would anyone know how far I can press my brake lever in when bleeding out my brakes? Maybe put put a block in @ half way to be safe?
I tape about a 1/2" black to keep from completely depressing the level. When bleeding, don't forget to bleed the banjo bolt. Seems little bubbles like hanging out in there!
 
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