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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Today I pulled my rear wheel to install a new sprocket, chain, and my sidemount taillight. As I was inspecting the hub and bearings, I noticed the o-ring on the sprocket side of the hub had broken. The dealer is already closed and won't be open tomorrow, so I hit up the auto parts store to see if they had anything suitable for a replacement. I found an o-ring very similar to the broken one but it's just a TINY bit thicker. The problem is that when I try to mate the sprocket flange assembly back into the hub, the replacement o-ring holds the sprocket flange out about 1/8" which means it won't sit flush in the hub so it ain't gonna work like that.

So common sense would say just wait until Monday, go to the dealer and get a new o-ring right? Well the problem is that since I have no garage to work in, I have my bike torn apart in the middle of my kitchen which is a problem because: 1-I don't really trust this crappy Craftsman bike jack, and 2-I have two VERY hyper Jack Russell Terriers who make me super nervous when they are around the bike when it's jacked up.

What would happen if I just put everything back together without the o-ring? Anyone know what this o-ring even does? I can't really tell what purpose it serves anyway. I'm sure it does something or it wouldn't be there, but what that is I couldn't say. I'd appreciate it if anyone can shed a little light on this for me. I know it's probably a retarded idea to even consider putting a wheel back together with missing parts, but I'm desperate. I dread the idea of putting the wheel back on minus the o-ring and then having to pull everything again just to put that stupid o-ring back on before I go riding.

This is on an 02 Shadow Spirit 750 BTW.

Here's some pics in case my explanations don't make sense:

http://img221.imageshack.us/img221/817/untitled1og3.jpg

 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
mark v said:
The o-ring will hold for a little bit and then it will shred to pieces cause it is fatter than the original.

I just had this happen to both of my inner drive axle seals on my car.
The o-ring I got at the auto parts store won't allow the sprocket flange to sit flush inside the hub so I can't even use it period. My big question is whether or not I can get by with not using it at all. Like I said, I know it's there for a reason, but for what reason I can't really tell. If I can get by without the o-ring until I change the tire or sprocket again then I'll just put it all back together and ride without one until then.

I looked closer at the setup and my guess is that the o-ring is a sort-of secondary dirt/dust/water seal in case something creeps by the ouside dust seal and prevents anything from entering into the area where the dampeners sit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
pokey said:
LOL, my wife would @#$*@# kill me if I did that in the kitchen!
When I got this bike back in November I didn't wanna keep it outside all winter so I ditched the kitchen table to make room for it in there. My girlfriend is still bitchin' about not having a table even though we always eat in the living room in front of the TV and the table was only there for looks.
 

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If you still have the old (correct size) 'O'- ring, get a very accurate diameter measurement with a caliper or micrometer. Go down to the auto parts store, buy yourself a kit that includes the correct size and make your own 'O'-rings.

If I understand you correctly, this 'O'-ring is just creating a seal between two surfacess that aren't moving. If that's the case, making your own 'O'-ring will be perfectly satisfactory. Do not try to make 'O'-rings for parts that move! Failure is 100% certain! I've made 'O'-rings as thin as 1/16" and as thick as 3/4". Pressures as high as 6000 PSI without problems. For all practical purposes they are as good as a store bought one under these conditions if you make them correctly.

John
 

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Olivereaman said:
If that's the case, making your own 'O'-ring will be perfectly satisfactory. Do not try to make 'O'-rings for parts that move! Failure is 100% certain! I've made 'O'-rings as thin as 1/16" and as thick as 3/4". Pressures as high as 6000 PSI without problems. For all practical purposes they are as good as a store bought one under these conditions if you make them correctly.
We make our own o-rings for the race car too.
We buy the material in bulk. We use it on the manifold between
it and the blower.

If the old o-ring has a fairly clean cut, clean it real good and square up
the edges and put a tiny dab of super glue on it and glue the ends together.

As Olivereaman stated though, if it's between moving parts, don't do it.
If it's just a liquid or dust seal, it would work fine.
 

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O-Ring

The O-Ring is actually a seal to keep the hub grease from seeping out from the joint between the sprocket assembly and the wheel due to centrifical force. Being that this joint does not rotate I would take the suggestion of repairing the old O-Ring. Clean it up good and put it back in place, take some 100% silcone and put a healthy dob at the split. It will go until next time you remove the wheel for tire replacement.

I'd also bet big bucks that the dealer will not have the O-Ring and you would have to wait for him to order it.
 
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