Honda Shadow Forums banner

1 - 20 of 37 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Old School baby...
Father/Son project - christmas present



The look on his face = FUN!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,689 Posts
Boy does that bring back memories......
We had a Heathkit Boonie-Bike when I was about 11 or 12 - 5hp 2 speed -
squared sided front wheel, and huge (almost ATV sized) rear wheel - it wouldn't turn for $hit, but it could do some serious hill climbing a slog along off road pretty well.

http://autos.groups.yahoo.com/group/heathkitbooniebike/

We didn't have the ski attachment for the front wheel though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,541 Posts
Two questions:

1) Is the frame custom made, or from a kit?
2) What kind of engine do you have in that?

When I was a kid, lo these many years ago, many of the mini-bikes were powered by a Briggs and Stratton lawnmower engine on a tubular steel frame custom made in someone's garage. The drive mechanism to the rear wheel was often a V-belt through a torque converter clutch mechanism. Low-tech, to be sure, but fun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
658 Posts
My oldest son - when he was about 12 - proudly came home with a 'mini-bike' he bought for $20 at a nearby garage sale. Pieces of a mini-bike were more like it. But the basics were there - frame, seat, handlebars, wheels, engine.

$200 or so in parts (out of dad's pocket, natch) and a couple dozen hours of father/son workshop time later, our finished project looked almost exactly like yours, soupbean. I can imagine the fun you and your kid had building that.

Thanks for bringing back some great memories.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
375 Posts
Santa brought this



And most of the kids in the house are learning quickly .

Jack
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
TucsonDon said:
Two questions:

1) Is the frame custom made, or from a kit?
2) What kind of engine do you have in that?

When I was a kid, lo these many years ago, many of the mini-bikes were powered by a Briggs and Stratton lawnmower engine on a tubular steel frame custom made in someone's garage. The drive mechanism to the rear wheel was often a V-belt through a torque converter clutch mechanism. Low-tech, to be sure, but fun.
We found the frame on craigslist. The guy had purchased one, painted it and assembled all the parts. I think he ordered the kit from:
http://www.mfgsupply.com/GoMiniKits.html
The orignal owner never was able to get it to work with the motor he had for it and by the time he got around to it his boys were kind of outgrowing it anyway. We purchased the Tecumseh 3.5 hp motor that was reccomended for this kit from the same company. The motor was a Christmas present for my son. We spent the day after Christmas getting the motor put on and all that stuff. This project has been a big success for us. Time together and letting him noodle out some of the problems and watching him develop troubleshooting skills etc.
-=I think I get as much of a kick out of it as he does!=-
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,827 Posts
That's pretty much how I got started too! I started on a home made one I guess I worked on it as much as I rode it! Talk about bringing back memories!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
190 Posts
Memories here too. A friend of mine in the 5th or 6th grade (around 1957) had a similar one, I think it was called a "Doodle-Bug" with a 1-1/2 Briggs engine. The old cast iron Briggs engines from scrapped reel type lawnmowers, or gasoline washing machine motors (with kick starters) were pretty easy to come by and we used to use them on our kluged together wooden gokarts.

Rick
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,827 Posts
The kick-start wash machine engine was one of my first projects as a "wee lad" and the wooden go-cart was re-invented in our neighborhood many times. Them were the good ol' days!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
190 Posts
Yeah, the clutch (a pivoting lever with idler pulley) was a no brainer, but brakes, if any, were a challenge
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,541 Posts
Kermitdafrog said:
Yeah, the clutch (a pivoting lever with idler pulley) was a no brainer, but brakes, if any, were a challenge
Ha! That's right. Brakes were for the rich kids. Us poor kids relied on our Chuck Taylors. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,827 Posts
Ya, I guess I went thru many many v-belts by taking off trying to spin the wheels, with that belt-tightener set-up. The centrifical clutch was like a new invention back then, and seemed like an automative transmission to me.
..and you know I still spend all day (or days) out in the shop fabricating past to this day. I went out in the shop at 10 A.M. yesterday, and didn't come back in the house untill 10 P.M. last night!!! Talk about an obsession!! :?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
190 Posts
Yep, I never had a clutch 'cuz they were expensive and not easily scrounged.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,827 Posts
I Hear ya!!
I am just fortunate that my dad was a heavy equipment mechanic and always had his share of "part" to scrounge thru. And I spent many days in the local dump picking thru old lawn mowers for parts. I can't believe how many people would actually throw a lawn mower out when the wheel fell off!!! I re-built more lawn mowers with parts from others and sold them to my less fortunate neighbors.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
190 Posts
With a Dad in that business, you must have had a lot of friends.

We used to live in a "Leave it to Beaver" type of neighborhood, and one of our favorite pastimes on Saturday mornings was to go "Trash Pile Hunting". It was amazing what kind of mechanical, electrical, and electronic stuff people would throw out. That's when I got started into electronics I guess. Two gifts I got for my 11th Birthday was a Weller soldering gun (to disassemble old radios and stuff for my junk box) and a used Hallicrafters S38-B shortwave receiver. My favorite "toy" was an Erector Set.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,827 Posts
ERECTOR SET?!!!
OH - MY- GOD...
I can't believe the things I built with one of those!! I only wished that I had access to that angle iron with all the holes in it (like you can buy at hardware stores) Kinda like a life-size erector set!!! The neighborhood would never be the same!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
190 Posts
I had that Erector Set for years. Used to use it for "prototyping" projects :D Do they still make 'em?

LOL - I just used a piece of that angle for an edge to rest my loading ramps on for the bike trailer I just put together.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,827 Posts
I don't recall seeing those Erector set anywhere lately (of course I don't spend much time in the toy isle anymore!! LOL)
I don't think they would sell very well nowadays, the kids don't seem to have the fabrication "drive" we did back then. They have all those new toys we only dreamed of having. Like they say, "Invention comes from neccessity" and we had to make our own toys or do without.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,541 Posts
Kermitdafrog said:
I had that Erector Set for years. Used to use it for "prototyping" projects :D Do they still make 'em?
Sure do ... Google it and stand back. Back in the old days it was really just a box of parts, and the imagination of the kid was needed to conjure up what to build. Nowadays the kits seem to be boxed around a particular kind of project -- a car, or a plane or crane -- and the kit contains pieces to make a crane look like a crane.

I used to love putting stuff together. I hated taking it apart and sorting out all the bolts and nuts and such. Usually I'd partially disassemble stuff and heap the stuff into the box. Of course, that merely deferred my need to take it apart and sort out all the bolts and nuts and such.

Update!

Check this out:

http://www.brain-builders.com/844700.html

"Builds 3 different realistically styled motorcycles. Flexible metal pieces allow for extra realism in the look of the model. Set contains 189 parts."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
190 Posts
Yeah, if you couldn't afford to buy it, which was usually my case, you had to build it. You can't cut but just so many yards in a summer.

I remember graduating from Lincoln Logs, then to Tinker Toys before the Erector Set.

When I watch my Grandson sit in front of the Nintendo or Gameboy for hours with a glazed look in his eyes, I just shake my head. I did manage to get him to take some interest in RC airplanes and helicopters when he came to visit in the summers, and maybe the video games helped him a little as he learned to hover a heli pretty quickly and also learned to fly planes fairly fast, but he wouldn't stay with it when he went back home. Shame.
 
1 - 20 of 37 Posts
Top