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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have my Shadow VT700 up on the center stand, raising the rear wheel off the ground. Worried about the front wheel, sitting around for the next 4+ months.

Wondering if I should raise the front end using a jack stand.
 

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If it's going to be sitting in the same place and not moved, I'd let a few #s of air out of the tires and call it good. Or if you're real concerned about it, tip it back on the ctr stand and set a block of wood under the frame front or a solid spot on the engine block. I move mine periodically if its in storage so it's not a concern.
 

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If it's going to be sitting in the same place and not moved, I'd let a few #s of air out of the tires and call it good. Or if you're real concerned about it, tip it back on the ctr stand and set a block of wood under the frame front or a solid spot on the engine block. I move mine periodically if its in storage so it's not a concern.
why let air out? you would want maximum pressure in it to resist flat spotting.

not that flat spotting is a huge concern with modern tires anyways, but I wouldnt want my tires to sit at low pressure and have a bulged side wall, a flat spot and then forget to air it back up in the spring...
 

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I would let it sit on the front tire, no harm will be had. The tires will be 100% fine, and try to keep them out of the sunlight if you can.
 

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honestly folks these things are not porcelain dolls that require such drastic measures
 

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I'll wipe Armor all on the SIDEWALLS only. Let it sit for a while and wipe any excess off. Best done with the wipes or spraying it onto a rag and wiping it on so none gets on the tread.
 

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no need to "store for winter" here but my bike gets parked on a rubber matt that runs the length of the Speedway Shelter i keep my Bike in.

Somewhere i read that concrete has a tendency to draw moisture from tires. Not sure how much that can effect a tire but its nice knowing my Metzelers have a layer of rubber between them and the bare concrete.
 

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honestly folks these things are not porcelain dolls that require such drastic measures
I once got caught in the fog and got morning dew on my Sabre. Took all weekend of polishing to make it right again. :lol:
 

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honestly folks these things are not porcelain dolls that require such drastic measures
Dave I've seen people do some very extreme things. Hang around with some GWRRA folks if you have a strong enough constitution. Better yet, go sample a Harley bunch. That rivals a religion. I do have to give the Harley people credit. I haven't seen stuffed animals affixed to their bikes. Yet.
 

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You will get more benefit from parking it over a plastic sheet to prevent moisture from the ground condensing on the underside of the bike.

Plus....maximize the front tire pressure then add a pound or two. It would take awhile to get a flat spot...much longer than 4 months.
 

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The weather is supposed to be cold and clear this weekend my tires should be in a different spot after a short ride to the no ethanol gas station and back. I will put Seafoam in it and ride it once a month or so, its the same thing I do with my old car. That's the only winterizing I will do other than battery tender.
 

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I have my Shadow VT700 up on the center stand, raising the rear wheel off the ground. Worried about the front wheel, sitting around for the next 4+ months.

Wondering if I should raise the front end using a jack stand.
I've stored my bikes in a cold garage or shed during our MN winters without doing anything to the tires or raising the bike to keep the tires off the ground. Never have I experienced flat spots on the tires when taking the bike out in the spring after making sure the tire pressure was checked and filled if needed. It is recommended by some sites to fill your bike's tires to the maximum psi rating indicated on the tire sidewall for long term storage. Concern yourself with winterizing the gas and fuel system with Stabil and keeping your battery charged during the winter sleep.
 

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Usually I'll park mine on wood during winter in the garage -- plywood or 3/4" boards. Maybe it keeps concrete from dessicating the rubber but it certainly keeps salt from the melted gobs that fall off the cars from reaching the bikes.

Stabil? What a racket! Wish I could come up with such a widely-used useless product.

If you're parking the bike for months, make sure the tank is full then drain the carb(s) through the drains conveniently built in. Ethanol-free gas is better than e-10 if you can get it but really doesn't make much difference for such a short duration.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Usually I'll park mine on wood during winter in the garage -- plywood or 3/4" boards. Maybe it keeps concrete from dessicating the rubber but it certainly keeps salt from the melted gobs that fall off the cars from reaching the bikes.

Stabil? What a racket! Wish I could come up with such a widely-used useless product.

If you're parking the bike for months, make sure the tank is full then drain the carb(s) through the drains conveniently built in. Ethanol-free gas is better than e-10 if you can get it but really doesn't make much difference for such a short duration.

I've done exactly that. My concern was having a flat spot. I got the bike six months ago and it was sitting garaged and covered for about 10 years. Took a bit to get it started and of course the tires had dry rot and were replaced. I'm protecting my investment.
 

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Stabil? What a racket! Wish I could come up with such a widely-used useless product.

If you're parking the bike for months, make sure the tank is full then drain the carb(s) through the drains conveniently built in. Ethanol-free gas is better than e-10 if you can get it but really doesn't make much difference for such a short duration.
Its a racket because it only has 1 yr. shelf life once opened but other than that I've been using it for 15 yrs. and never had issues with carbed equipment the folowing season.

I agree a completely full tank of gas of the non ethanol variety is best but some folk don't have that luxury thus I would definitely use Stabil. The type of "storage" space is a factor to how to store a vehicle. A non heated shed storage requires more precautions than lets say my garage that has insulated climate with heat as needed and doesn't have salt debri allowed to stay to the point of getting even close to anything. Damn bikes have it good around my place. :D
 

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...I've been using it for 15 yrs. and never had issues with carbed equipment the folowing season.
Absence of evidence = evidence of absence? No, not really.

The only issues I've ever encountered with short-term (i.e. less than a year) storage of carbureted vehicles came from the sludge left behind from evaporation when carbs weren't drained. It was worse EVERY time someone used Stabil, ran it into the carbs then shut down. Putting extra goop into the fuel is no substitute for draining the carbs!

The type of "storage" space is a factor to how to store a vehicle. A non heated shed storage requires more precautions than lets say my garage that has insulated climate with heat as needed and doesn't have salt debri allowed to stay to the point of getting even close to anything.
That's why I specifically mentioned garage storage in my post. The front tire of my bike is barely more than a foot from the bumper of my car during the winter months. Garage is heated by the afternoon sun on the south and west sides of house. (House isn't truly aligned east-west but close.) Around here, that can mean widely varying temperatures. I've had to cut the grass on the first day of a new year and I've had weeks with sub-zero F temps.

Never have I experienced flat spots on the tires when taking the bike out in the spring after making sure the tire pressure was checked and filled if needed.
Flat spots have never been a concern, not even on old bikes I've purchased. Hard spots, though, enter my thoughts from time to time when I read about the possibility of dessication from contact to concrete during temperature swings above and below freezing.

Don't know that it matters much -- I'm more concerned about puddling of salted-ice melt on the occasional warm days. Probably wouldn't hurt the bike tires enough to care but a little prevention takes almost no effort.
 

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Dave I've seen people do some very extreme things. Hang around with some GWRRA folks if you have a strong enough constitution. Better yet, go sample a Harley bunch. That rivals a religion. I do have to give the Harley people credit. I haven't seen stuffed animals affixed to their bikes. Yet.

The Harley thing doesn't rival a religion it IS a religion
 
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