Honda Shadow Forums banner

101 - 120 of 160 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
502 Posts
I say from my experience, is take your time getting to the place. Don't have to rush to be anywhere! Plan ahead where you want to go and the ride will be enjoyable and DEFINALLY safe!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
217 Posts
Dont get fooled by a road that has nice controlled curves for miles. I did and suddelny I found myself passing by the hairpin curve to the right and cleaning out the gutter on the left instead. The turn was hidden by the trees and I went where I was looking. And yes, I rode back to town in an ambulance......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Experienced riders need to read this over and over, too. I've noticed that experienced riders get in accidents, injured, or killed at a higher rate than beginners. Experienced riders get comfortable/relaxed and when that happens...well, you end up dead.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Great advice, but still slightly confused

I have taken the MSC and have to admit, I still feel a little confused regarding "counter steering." I saw that I should be "pressing forward" in reading this thread. I thought I was supossed to press down. For example, press down on the left= lean left an vise versa. That is how I have been making my turns. However, I have noticed that my turns seem very wide (city driving). Is this due to how I have been "counter steering"? I've been rideing less than a month, so any input would be great! :)
 

·
Registered
2005 Honda VTX 1300R
Joined
·
1,085 Posts
I have taken the MSC and have to admit, I still feel a little confused regarding "counter steering." I saw that I should be "pressing forward" in reading this thread. I thought I was supossed to press down. For example, press down on the left= lean left an vise versa. That is how I have been making my turns. However, I have noticed that my turns seem very wide (city driving). Is this due to how I have been "counter steering"? I've been rideing less than a month, so any input would be great! :)
Remember that the bike goes where you are looking. Try looking farther into the turn and turning your head more.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
MY MOTORCYCLE RIDING SURVIVAL SUGGESTIONS:
If you are under 30 years old, don't even think of getting a sport bike. 150 HP and testosterone poisoning DO NOT MIX. Over 50% of the 20 somethings that buy a sport bike as their first bike, total it within 2 years!

Get a white or brightly colored bike that is NIMBLE and quick to turn, like my 750 RS. Then, maintain it like it was an airplane. Watch the tire pressure, and check EVERY nut & bolt they touched, if you hire your service done. Buy the real "shop Manual" for it too, and learn what you don't know about the bike. (Don't take the reflectors off the bike!)

Dress in boots and BRIGHTLY colored padded gear if it is not too hot, and ALWAYS wear a full coverage helmet at least. Silver reflective tape helps if you ride at night. Remember, your body is the largest most visible thing, not the bike.

Given the option, ride in the countryside during daylight, not in town. Then... BE CAREFUL OF DEER, especially around dusk or dawn. In town, always assume that you are not seen, or that that jerk is going to run through the red light or stop sign. (Happened to me many times). Don't insist on your "right of way". You can end up being DEAD RIGHT!

If you DO ride in the country, slow WAY down, like 10 MPH, for folks riding horses. I squeeze the clutch and coast by them to be QUIET. They are VERY spooky animals around motorcycles. I used to ride them, I know! You don't want a 2,000 animal sitting on you...

Slow down for dogs too. They can really mess you up if you hit one, and many dogs feel compelled to try to run you down.

Slow down and scan at EVERY intersection, and if you are being tailgated, get out of the lane, or pull over. Just don't allow it to continue! If you have to gun it to find a spot in a less hostile lane, and get a ticket, that is still safer than having a truck on your tail.

Use your low beams at all times in daylight, and... Don't have flashing headlight modulators, loud pipes, or in any other way give the finger to offenders. The best defense, is to be of no OFFence. Don'tpissemoffdude, they can kill you with a flick of the wrist!

Don't ride faster, or take that curve faster, than you are willing to crash, and never over drive a curve... Look for sand, leaves, grass, gravel, oil, or water to suddenly appear, well into a curve. If you are not over driving it, (= not going faster than you can see around it), you can slow down and straighten up enough to glide through the risk.

NEVER EVER tailgate or come close. The car in front of you may straddle that concrete block in the road, and it will appear in front of you in a split second! Give yourself time to react. The above, btw, has also happened to me.

Avoid the oily area in the middle of the road, but don't ride too near the middle white line either. Some cars with their drivers on the damned phone, drift over by a foot or two! Avoid the shoulder side too, as going off may include a 6" deep drop off.

At an intersection, be on the left side of the right lane, if you are turning right, &
vice versa. That way you're more visible.

Don't pass cars in front of you that are slowing and turning, just chill... They may cut in the opposite direction than they're signaling, RIGHT into you!

And though it may seem over the top, WEAR EAR PLUGS, if you want to hear well and not have Tinnitus when you get older. A LOT of old motorcycle riders can't hear their bikes now, for the ringing in their ears, 24/7. (Myself included)...

I learned these things the hard way, but I say: "Learn slow, remember long". Mostly... Be defensive, and ride SMART!
Mark
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,857 Posts
My two pennies:

I don't put my kickstand down when fueling up. I stay on the bike and keep the bike level while filling. Doing this allows a little more gas to get in to the tank, even if it is only .4 of a gallon, that's a few more miles..
A bad practice to do that. First, an overflow hits a hot exhaust, bursts into flame. How quickly are you going to get away from that bike, overfull fuel tank ready to spill more fuel into the flames when you lean it to get off, no stand down and you're in a panic. a very rare event but it does happen.

More likely, you'll have any spill end up, well, forget about sex for a few nights. Petrol and sensitive skin areas don't mix very well at all.

Safer if you're off the bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
417 Posts
When filling the issue that strikes me is your footing. You're on concrete that can have gas, oil and diesel residue on it. I think most riders have that moment of "slip" that puts some serious fear into them. You're probably better off with the kickstand at least down so if you do slip it'll catch you. Me? I like to get off the bike and stretch my legs....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
FWIW- and at the risk it has been said before:
NEVER, NEVER TURN OFF THE IGNITION WITH THE KICKSTAND UP! CONFIRM THAT THE TRANSMISSION IS IN NEUTRAL (DON'T TRUST THE BLUE IDIOT LIGHT!), PUT THE KICKSTAND DOWN, THEN TURN OFF THE IGNITION.
I actually dismount and let the bike idle briefly before I turn it off. This assures me that I am next to it if the stand stars to collapse and that I will notice if the motor has any unusual idle characteristics.
 
101 - 120 of 160 Posts
Top