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I added a Stebel air horn and really think it helped me today. Someone looked at me and then was just about to pull out right in front of me - too close for comfort. A blast from the air horn shocked them into stopping.


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Just got one from a shopping ride today.

I've seen in this thread people talk about the idea of following cars closely through an intersection, the idea being to lessen the chance of someone else wanting to cross behind them and hitting you in the process.

I was wary of the idea but I can see and even to a point agree with the logic.

However.

Coming off a round-a-bout today, the car in front did the turn and I sat just behind it like the text says. Only, the car I was following suddenly stopped and started to cut across me - the driver was turning into a driveway!

He was almost in my blindspot and just by chance I noticed him slowing and had time to hit the brakes. Of course, with so many idiots these days if you're not on their phone screen you're in their blind spot so I doubt he saw me even though I was sitting where I could see his face in his mirror (he wasn't using his phone but I hope you get the point).

Had I been less mindful, I would've been eating pavement.

I'm not saying not to use this idea, as there is a chance it'll help you avoid being hit. What I am saying is that if you're close to a vehicle and they stop or decide to turn across your path (like turning into a driveway just past the intersection) then if you've got very little time to see them, react, and stop safely. Keep that in mind.

Me, unless the situation warrants it, I'll take the intersections slower and leave some space. At least enough to determine that the reason he had his left indicator on all the time was because he was making a second turn (equivalent to him turning right then right again for those who drive on the weird side of the road :) )

Rubber down, shiny stuff up, gun holstered no matter how tempting, forgive, forget, and have fun :)
 

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How would you handle a large bag?

And another - wind riding.

I was talking with a friend who had to go out on his bike in the rough weather we're having at the moment (rough for town folk, a gentle breeze with perhaps a tiny bit of drizzle for us countryfolk :) )

He had a number of hazards to deal with that wouldn't normally be present. First, there was the wind and things like tree debris (leaves, branches etc).

Next, being the rubbish and recycling collection day for some neighbourhoods, he had to deal with things from bags of rubbish to bottles to plastic recycling bins (around 10gallon plastic cubes) to one that scared him a lot when he saw it making it's way to him; a very large plastic bag that probably was around a king-size mattress or a large settee or something like that. How would one handle that if they were to be caught by it? He stopped and waited for it to blow past (thankfully he was observant and saw it beforehand) but the afterthought of hitting something like that.. We can't see any way to come out unscathed if it gets around you and under a wheel as well, especially front. Any one have any thoughts how you could survive if you were to get caught up in a large sheet of plastic?

Anyway, we also have summer roads that haven't had rain for weeks, so the next set of hazards were related to slick roads. We practice braking and the like, so slick roads themselves aren't a big concern - if a large bag was to blow across the road or a branch was to come down and he had to slow down or stop in a hurry, he could probably do it. But the person behind probably wouldn't manage it, especially if they were some of the more common cage managers (ie useless at driving)

So...

If you must ride on windy days, let the bike wander around the lane (don't fight it), only adjusting if necessary to avoid hazards or stay within your lane. Let the bike do what it wants, and you'll be less tired then if you fight it the whole way.

Be mindful that the road surface can change very suddenly, as could the clear road ahead. You may just get plastic or junk mail or leaves or other stuff blowing around the road - these can be slippery but no big deal - but you could also get road signs or larger tree branches coming at you fast.

And the thing you perhaps most need to take into account - your bike might be nimble with excellent brakes and can stop on a dime from a hundred, but the SUV behind you might not stop so quick.

Consider how to handle someone close behind you in conditions where you may need to stop in a hurry - and can those behind you stop themselves? It might be one of those days where it's better to take the cage, if you have one.
 

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May have already been touched on about clutching at stops.

I am probably one of the few if only ones here that don’t do it. Why? I was unfortunate enough to have an equipment failure ( clutch cable broke in an area I could not see on inspection) bout 3 decades ago. Had I not been stopped a little short of the intersection, instead of lurching and dying BEFORE going into traffic, it would have lurched, and died (and me!) in traffic.

Probably not a popular opinion, but there it is.


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May have already been touched on about clutching at stops.

I am probably one of the few if only ones here that don’t do it. Why? I was unfortunate enough to have an equipment failure ( clutch cable broke in an area I could not see on inspection) bout 3 decades ago. Had I not been stopped a little short of the intersection, instead of lurching and dying BEFORE going into traffic, it would have lurched, and died (and me!) in traffic.

Probably not a popular opinion, but there it is.


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What do you mean by clutching on stops?
Not sure I follow, others may not either. Care to explain more for us?




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Riding tips for new and experienced riders

While at a stop, the bike is in gear, and you are engaging the clutch.

Just what I always have heard it referred to.






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While at a stop, the bike is in gear, and you are engaging the clutch.

Just what I always have heard it referred to.






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Ok, gotcha!
Yes, I do that at EVERY STOP!
Too many people use stops as breaks to light a smoke or whatever...
Safest bet is to have clutch in, bike in 1st and watching mirrors.
At least that's the way all of the courses I have take have recommended stopping.




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I have noticed most people do these days. “Safe” has come on long way in a relatively short time. Kudos for that.

Different schools of thought and experience, give all of us something to ponder, and at the end of the day, what is safest for each of us based on what we glean from that information.

Only THE SHADOW KNOWS


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May have already been touched on about clutching at stops.

I am probably one of the few if only ones here that don’t do it. Why? I was unfortunate enough to have an equipment failure ( clutch cable broke in an area I could not see on inspection) bout 3 decades ago. Had I not been stopped a little short of the intersection, instead of lurching and dying BEFORE going into traffic, it would have lurched, and died (and me!) in traffic.

Probably not a popular opinion, but there it is.
I've also had a clutch cable break. I still generally do it until I have a "shield" behind me, then I might put the bike into neutral and relax the hand for a bit.

My concern isn't equipment failure but my hand giving out, eg if I've been doing a lot of clutch work for some reason that day and the arthritis is being a pain.

However, I believe you're more likely to be hit from behind then to have a failed clutch send you into traffic, and keeping the brakes on (esp the rear) would hopefully stop the bike before it gets too far if your cable/hydraulics were to fail :)

I have had a close call - stopped at a set of lights with my bike outside the line of the car in front (rather than parked behind them so I had somewhere to go). SUV driver behind me started reading his paper, not watching. His car wasn't stopped like he thought it was. I had to move or get stomped, so I did. Poor person in the car I passed had no where to go. The stupid twit SUV driver only looked up from his paper to wonder why his POS suddenly jerked. Real glad my only involvement was giving a witness statement, not a damage list!

@Coop - from the context I'm assuming @jrmyrick means the practice of having your bike in gear, clutch in, when you're stopped at intersections just in case you need to make a quick getaway (eg you see someone coming up behind you who has no chance of stopping).
 

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@Coop - from the context I'm assuming @jrmyrick means the practice of having your bike in gear, clutch in, when you're stopped at intersections just in case you need to make a quick getaway (eg you see someone coming up behind you who has no chance of stopping).
Yes! Always be prepared to leave FAST if the traffic behind you doesn't see you! There was 2 couples killed several years ago down South of us. They were stopped at a redlight no ding their own business and got rear ended. They were related and both couples had kids. Kinda pays to keep yourself on your toes traffic stops.





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While at a stop, the bike is in gear, and you are engaging the clutch.

Just what I always have heard it referred to.






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Ok, gotcha!
Yes, I do that at EVERY STOP!
Too many people use stops as breaks to light a smoke or whatever...
Safest bet is to have clutch in, bike in 1st and watching mirrors.
At least that's the way all of the courses I have take have recommended stopping.




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I might pop it in neutral long enough to stretch but yeah I'm same way. Ready to move if someone isn't paying attention.
 

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I might pop it in neutral long enough to stretch but yeah I'm same way. Ready to move if someone isn't paying attention.
I'm the same. If I either have a few vehicles stopped behind me (ie would take a huge truck to move them) OR I have a decent clear road behind me and can see there's nothing there I'll go to neutral and stretch/relax (especially at a longer stop). Otherwise, bike in gear in a position where I can make a getaway and mirrors firmly watched.
 

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May I use this section to ask, even sometimes stupid, questions as someone new in motorcycling? I have some, and Im sure they could be really stupid, but I need some answers to pass over some doubts and to fix my attention over more important things. If it is not OK to use this section, just ignore my questions, or, the best, give me direction where to ask. Please!
1.I read some explanations, but I still need someone who ride Shadow to prove that it is like this - When I switch on 6th gear, OD light switches on too. If Im right, this means only that I reached the last gear, and to ride with OD light switched on is just OK? Is this right?
2. I can not get used to rpms of my motorcycle. The reason is my long experience as a car driver and my zero experience as a motorcycle rider. I need to feel my Honda peaceful and right managed. When I ride it in the town with 4K rpms, for example, I feel them "too high" :( On the highway, riding with 90mph, rpms are 6K on 6th gear and I feel it OK, but I feel confused when I ride with lower speed. Are there perfect or preferred rpms for riding with some speed or in the town? I understand that my question might be badly "constructed", but I hope you will catch the idea.
Thank you!
 

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Yes the 6th gear is the only one called overdrive and has a light.
Made for high speed and lower engine RPM and wear and better MPG.

I am in 4th many times at 40 MPH just to cruise along with traffic and save gas. Around 3000 RPM it feels fine. No harm done, unless you lug the engine and make it overwork.
And if you need to blast off, down shift one or two gears and twist the throttle. These engine go up to 7-8000 RPM +.
My old bike pulls really strong about 5000 RPM, and it is fun to rip up the road at times.
But since it is 37 years old I am trying to keep it healthy.
 

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2. I can not get used to rpms of my motorcycle.
I once had the opposite problem. For a few years my CBX was a horrible sluggish beast compared to my Shadow, which was nimble, quick, and always seemed to be whispering "faster!faster!faster!" in my ears like an over-excited speed-freak puppy might.

I'd proabbly done some 30 or 40,000 miles on my CBX before I realised that instead of shifting in the 2,000-4,000 RPM ranges I should try at 5,000 and up. I was too used to riding low-RPM cruisers instead of higher-RPM sports bikes (or sports-wannabes in the case of the CBX).

Even experienced riders can make that sort of mistake, especially when we're used to only one sort of engine. I've also driver lots of tractors and other large vehicles. Even 1,000 RPM seems high to me.
 

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HEY, KIWI nice to hear from you !
 
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HEY, KIWI nice to hear from you !
And nice to see you're still here...

Will be nicer if you lend your excellent expertise to the oil thread I started earlier..

(And to keep this on topic for the Tips thread : Don't leave an oil leak for too long, it may get bad and drip on your tyre. When you get that onto any water you could quickly learn that slides are great on steel guitars but NOT FUN on steel bikes!)
 
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