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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone here have one?

I just purchased and installed the 2.5" rear kit. I love the ride and the look, but I am worried that my passenger capacity may be comprimised. Essentially the fender clearance has been significantly reduced.

Anyone have any experience with this kit and riding two-up?

Sorry about the picture quality. Hopefully I can post another this weekend.

I also purchased the front drop kit but I don't think I am going to use it (yet). That would definately comprimise my cornering ability. :shock:
 

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AERO_HEAD said:
Anyone here have one?

I just purchased and installed the 2.5" rear kit. I love the ride and the look, but I am worried that my passenger capacity may be comprimised. Essentially the fender clearance has been significantly reduced....
I do believe you've just answered your own question. :) Significantly reduced fender clearance will reduce load capacity, unless you increase the spring preload to try & compensate.

I lowered mine by getting Progressive 11" shocks, which did essentially the same thing as the Scootworks 2 1/2" kit. I do not ride 2 up that often, so it's not that big of a deal. When my wife does go, I set the shock spring preload to 5. It works, but I have to watch for potholes, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the reply. Actually, if I could rephrase the question.........

Has anyone (who installed this kit) ridden two up and what was your results? I have 2-3 inches of fender clearance which for me is perfect, however, I have not yet lured my wife out to the bike to try it out. I did notice that even with the shocks on the highest setting, I have an increased range for wheel/shock travel due to the altered shock angle.

My concern is that since the shocks compress so much easier now, that our combined weight will use up the available clearance and therefore rub.

The wife and I dress out to be about 200lbs respectively.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Well I am a little encouraged. Despite not having an opportunity to get the wife on the bike with me (too cold for her), I have made a couple of observations.

First, I broke out the trusty old tape measure. I laid down next to the bike and measured the tire from the ground to the wheel's lip; 4 inches. Then I took the tape and slid it up between the tire and fender until the end of the tape made contact with the top of the fender (where it begins to curve). I, again, observed the measurement to the lip of the wheel; 7 inches.
OK, with a best case senario of 3 inches of clearance to play with, I then began thinking about the weight distribution. My 195lbs does very little to the bike's ride height when I sit on the saddle, however, if I slide back to the passenger seat, there is increased shock movement due to the load being centered over the shocks. Not too hard to figure out. :roll: I placed the tape measure in such a manner that it stood vertical with the end at the base of my rear fender. I then sat in the saddle; The bike lowered 1/2 inch. I then moved to the rear of the bike and threw a leg over the luggage rack and held on to the backrest with both feet off the ground :oops: (I figured this way I was levering my weight the farthest rearward, therefore, maximizing the movement results). This time, there was 1 inch of movement.
So without any solid road experience with the wife on board, my estimation is that with the 2.5 inch kit installed, shocks on the highest load setting, I should have 1"-1.5" of clearance to absorb any major road obstuctions; potholes, speedbumps, etc.
Until I can get her on again, I'll keep my fingers crossed. :lol:
 

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The worst that's gonna happen is you go for a rip, hit a pothole and the tire rubs, and then you know.

Just crank up the preload, and go. I think you're overthinking it.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
rat said:
The worst that's gonna happen is you go for a rip, hit a pothole and the tire rubs, and then you know.

Just crank up the preload, and go. I think you're overthinking it.
You're right Rat.

Trouble is, my tail and tag light wires run up the center of the fender (best I can tell without a manual) and I don't want to rip them out because then the whole shabang will have to come off.

But that's the way it's gonna go down. I'll get her on there and go for it!

I had an old '72 Sportster that I lowered using shorter H-D shocks. Kind of a vintage version of the modern day "Hugger". Problem was when I rode a passenger, the rear tire would rub the retaining screws for the passenger seat. Luckily enough, the screws had rounded heads and didn't cut the tire. What I ended up with is an Avon tire with an extra center "groove". :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
UPDATE

Well, after riding with the kit installed for just over a month now..........

I have taken it off.

I would get a very loud, very distinct bottoming noise as I would ride over RR tracks or uneven pavement at any speed. I also did not like the fact that it decreases your load bearing ability. I also found that the noise I was hearing was my shocks slamming into my fender rails!! I now have two very large dents in my chrome shock covers that I have rotated inward to conceal them. Thanks Scootworks. I did contact them before I ordered the kit and they assured me that I could install them without any adverse effects. :roll:
BTW, I am only 195lbs so be aware that if you buy this kit for an Aero 750 and you exceed 200lbs, you will damage your shock covers. It is due to the severe angle the shocks are put in.

I loved the look, but it's not worth the sacrifice. :evil:
 

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I have the 2.5 lowering kit, No problems 2 up, My rear suspension is set on 2. I did rub the fender once (Sounded like it anyways, maybe it didn't) But I hit a very bad bump, and it takes a bad bump to hit the fender.
 
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