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I recently posted a question on a low compression/possible heavy carbon problem and got a lot of great advice on things I can try before I turn it over to the mechanic to have the top end taken apart. I bought some Seafoam today and intent to mix it in w/a few tanks of gas. The can says it can help to put a few ounces in the crankcase, also. Anybody ever had any problems doing that? Thanks, (I alreaady owe several of you several of your favorite beverages)
 

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jon lewis said:
I recently posted a question on a low compression/possible heavy carbon problem and got a lot of great advice on things I can try before I turn it over to the mechanic to have the top end taken apart. I bought some Seafoam today and intent to mix it in w/a few tanks of gas. The can says it can help to put a few ounces in the crankcase, also. Anybody ever had any problems doing that? Thanks, (I alreaady owe several of you several of your favorite beverages)
I would be a little hesitant of putting anything but the right oil in the crankcase. With a wet clutch system, I wouldn't put anything in there that might cause slippage.
 

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I did it once, just because of what I read on the Seafoam can. :D. I put a few oz in, rode the bike awhile, then changed the oil. Can't say it helped, but it didn't hurt either. Bike runs fine, uses no oil. I probably won't be doing it again, no need. But if my bike had a problem, I don't think it would hurt anything to give it a try. Just follow the directions.
 

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Other than fuel stabilizer for winter storage; I'm not a big fan of any type of additives.........

IMO, they're just another way to get at your wallet!
Phil
 

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Here`s a copy of a post from another Forum. This guy put 5or6 ounces in his crankcase and "The Honda Tick" weny awat, and his bike never ran better!

I can't believe it. I changed out all the fluids, and used Mobil 1 V-Twin synthetic. Went for a hard ride, and the engine started ticking pretty bad at idle. I assumed it was the hot primary gear problem that plagues these bikes at times, but it seemed worse than I had ever heard. Anyway, I was bummed, so when I got home, I stared at it ticking away, then added 6 oz. of Sea Foam to the crankcase. I have never added anything to the oil, but at this point, I figured what the hell, since the engine was sounding lousy anyway. Started it up, still hot, and it was ticking away, so I was just sitting there pondering the whole situation for 3-4 minutes when the ticking suddenly faded away, just like that! My engine got quieter than I have ever heard it, I mean not a sound except the exhaust note. Ran it for another 30 minutes in disbelief - silky quiet.
 

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I too added Sea Foam to my crankcase this past summer.........had just changed the oil and filter, added about 2 ounces and then drove it around for about a week. My motor has been "ticking" since I bought the bike in 2004. It's only a little '85 VT500C but it is mint and has low mileage.
Back to the Foam...........I checked the oil in a week and it was black as if it had been in there for a year. The filter was also clogged, so I changed the oil once again, replaced the oil filter and the bike has never been that good. Of course I also changed the air filter, and spark plugs so it should run great.
I now get an additional 500 RPM's at 60 MPH not to mention the ticking while idling has gone away.
Just make sure you don't run the bike in high heat and for long distances with that Sea Foam in...............it acts like a super detergent and will clean the whole motor but you don't want it to strip the lubricant value of the oil so that friction begins to occur.............in other words, use it with respect..........light daily runs and short trips are the order of the day.
Krusty
 

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I now get an additional 500 RPM's at 60 MPH
Just curious what you mean by that. Nothing added to the oil will change the gearing ratios between the crank, transmission, & rear wheel.

If your engine is turning 500 rpm faster at 60mph than it used to, either you're only in 4th gear :D or your clutch is slipping :( .
 
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roadsnakes said:
Here`s a copy of a post from another Forum. This guy put 5or6 ounces in his crankcase and "The Honda Tick" weny awat, and his bike never ran better!
This would only work on a Honda with hydraulic lifters (1100s) that are sticking. On a bike with solid lifters (750s) this will do nothing for engine noises and ticking.

Like Phil, I steer clear of additives. Adding a solvent like seafoam to oil can't possibly lubricate the engine properly. You may get rid of the ticking but how much top end wear might occur in the process ?
 

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DynoBobSlick said:
Like Phil, I steer clear of additives. Adding a solvent like seafoam to oil can't possibly lubricate the engine properly.
In proper concentration, as recommended, it will not change the
lubrication properties of the oil to any noticeable extetent.
However, 5 or 6 oz, as stated before would likely cause a noticeable
change in the viscosity of the oil. I doubt very seriously it would cause
any major problems, but it's always better to use the recommended amounts.
When dealing with such a small amount of oil (~2 qts), 5 or 6 oz is a good
percentage of the total fluid.

SeaFoam and the other additives are nothing more than some
toluene and mineral spirits that act as cleansing agents.
They are not really intended to be put in an engine with fresh oil and run
the full oil change.
The stuff is intended to be used for in a couple hundred mile runs....like
adding it a couple of hundred miles before an oil change to help
clean up the engine just before a drain.
It's not really even recommended to leave that stuff in the oil
during a cool down period. It should be put in, ran, and drained while hot.

For wet clutch applications, such as our bikes, I would substitute some
Dextron III ATF for the SeaFoam in the crankcase.
Dextron III ATF is designed to 'wet clutch' applications, such as in automatic transmissions.
ATF is very high in detergent and will help cleanse the engine just as well,
if not better than SeaFoam, and will definitely not harm the clutch
or other internals.

And just as a side note, if the oil is changed on a regular basis and
the proper maintenance is followed, no crankcase additives are needed,
as DynoBobSlick and Phil stated.
 

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i put seafoam in my lawnmower as it was knocking badly..after 10 minutes,it cleaned and loosen up whatever wascausing it..then i drained the oil..

i wouldnot use it in crankcase of your bike,unless you drained oil after say, 20 minutes of around town driving,while hot..

it does work..
 

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Just to clear up this additional RPM's I acquired after cleaning the crankcase and replacing the plugs...............the engine was "labouring" a bit before I tuned it up..........with the clean air filter, new oil filter, new oil, new plugs the engine ran a lot smoother with a lot more power and less gas. I didn't have to crank the throttle as hard to climb hills and I found that on a level run at about 90 KMH the revs were down to about 3600 instead of 4100 in sixth gear. I guess what I was saying the motor wasn't putting out the potential HP it was originally designed for to achieve at the speed I was trying to get to. I know this sounds like the clutch could have been slipping all along with the dirty oil but if that was the case wouldn't it have burned out eventually?.
Krusty
 

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Krusty said:
Just to clear up this additional RPM's I acquired after cleaning the crankcase and replacing the plugs...............the engine was "labouring" a bit before I tuned it up..........with the clean air filter, new oil filter, new oil, new plugs the engine ran a lot smoother with a lot more power and less gas. I didn't have to crank the throttle as hard to climb hills and I found that on a level run at about 90 KMH the revs were down to about 3600 instead of 4100 in sixth gear. I guess what I was saying the motor wasn't putting out the potential HP it was originally designed for to achieve at the speed I was trying to get to. I know this sounds like the clutch could have been slipping all along with the dirty oil but if that was the case wouldn't it have burned out eventually?.
Krusty
At 90km/h at 4100 rpm I'd be in third of the six gears in my 83 Shadow 750.
 

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The crankshaft has a gear on the end of it called the "Primary Drive gear" this gear directly connects to its mate called the "Primary Driven Gear".
The primary driven gear is mounted to the outter clutch housing, sometimes called the "clutch basket". The clutch basket drives the the inner clutch hub, this is sometimes called the "Clutch Boss"
The rotating energy of the clutch basket is transfered to the boss via the clutch plates.
The boss is center splined to the transmission's primary input shaft, the gears on the input shaft is center splined to that shaft. The teeth of those gears engage with the teeth of the gears that are center splined to the transmissions secondary output shaft sometimes called the "counter shaft". On chain drive motorcycles the front sprocket is called the "counter shaft sprocket" and it mounts to the outside very end of that shaft, then the sprocket chain goes to the rear sprocket.

I said all of that to say this,
If the crankshaft is turning at whatever RPM, then the primary drive gears are doing what they do and have no way to change their rate of rotation.
The transmission gears turn at whatever rotation, and the counter shaft sprocket turns at its rotation,
the chain does what it does,
the rear wheel turns.
Due to all the gear engagements, the only place were an RPM difference can happen between the RPM's of the crank shaft and the rear wheel and in the same selected transmission gear is at the connection of the clutch basket and the clutch boss (clutch plates)
Good running,
bad running,
ten horse power,
ten thousand horse power,
thick oil or thin oil.
The gearing can't change with out gears being broken. Its a law of physics that is written in stone!

A vehicle may run smoother, my feel more powerfull, but the engine RPM's at a certain speed in the same gear with a manual transmission can't change because its all set up by "gear set ratios" which means that each gear is engaged to its mate, but the two gears are a different size so each has a different amount of teeth and turn at a different rotation rate. A gear set CAN have a 1 to 1 ratio (same size, same amount of teeth), that happens when energy from one shaft is needed to be transfered to another, and without a higher or lower gearing of the gear set, but its still a FIXED engaugement!

Now, if your clutch wasn't slipping and you had an indecated difference in RPM's in sixth gear at the same speed, then your tach is not working right.
MarkC
 

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Krusty said:
Just to clear up this additional RPM's I acquired after cleaning the crankcase and replacing the plugs...............the engine was "labouring" a bit before I tuned it up..........with the clean air filter, new oil filter, new oil, new plugs the engine ran a lot smoother with a lot more power and less gas. I didn't have to crank the throttle as hard to climb hills and I found that on a level run at about 90 KMH the revs were down to about 3600 instead of 4100 in sixth gear. I guess what I was saying the motor wasn't putting out the potential HP it was originally designed for to achieve at the speed I was trying to get to. I know this sounds like the clutch could have been slipping all along with the dirty oil but if that was the case wouldn't it have burned out eventually?.
Krusty
I'm with MarkC, your tach isn't working correctly OR your clutch is slipping.

RPM will not and physically cannot change at a given static speed unless
the clutch is slipping. The tach being bad will cause it to look different,
but it's not, in real application.

You can raise your bike off the ground (little power needed to drive),
put a super charger on it, nitrous, give it 900 extra hp, etc..
The RPM at a given speed will ALWAYS be the same no matter what unless
you physically change a gear set or the clutch slips.
 
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